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Hushang M. Payan

–902. 7. Payan , H. , Strebel , R. , and Levine , S. Epileptogenic effect of extradural and extracranial cobalt. Nature, Lond. , 1965 , 208 : 792 – 793 . Payan , H., Strebel , R., and Levine , S. Epileptogenic effect of extradural and extracranial cobalt. Nature, Lond. , 1965, 208: 792–793. 8. Robinson , F. , and Johnson , M. Histopathological studies of time reactions to vraious metals, implanted in the cat brains. ASD Technical Report , 1961 , 61–397 : 1 – 13 (TAB index, 1962

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Anthony M. Dymond, Lloyd E. Kaechele, John M. Jurist and Paul H. Crandall

. Punctures of the brain. The factors concerned in gliosis and in cicatricial contraction. Archs Neurol. Psychiat. , 1928, 20: 1–13. 24. Robinson , R. R. , and Johnson , M. T. Histopathological studies of tissue reactions to various metals implanted in cat brains. In: ASD Technical Report , 61 – 397 , Dayton, Ohio : Wright-Patterson Air Force Base , 1961 , 13 pp. Robinson , R. R., and Johnson , M. T. Histopathological studies of tissue reactions to various metals implanted in cat brains. In: ASD Technical Report , 61

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Surgical treatment of cerebral metastases from lung cancer

The effect on quality and duration of survival

Edwin E. MacGee

: Metastatic tumors of the brain: a follow-up study of 195 patients with neurosurgical considerations. J Neurosurg 17 : 361 – 373 , 1960 Simionescu MD: Metastatic tumors of the brain: a follow-up study of 195 patients with neurosurgical considerations. J Neurosurg 17: 361–373, 1960 18. Spiers ASD : Cerebral metastases from carcinoma of the lung. Med J Aust 2 : 178 – 183 , 1969 Spiers ASD: Cerebral metastases from carcinoma of the lung. Med J Aust 2: 178–183, 1969 19. Stoier M : Metastatic tumors of

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Howard J. Senter, Aizik Wolf and Franklin C. Wagner Jr.

Elevation Lowest CPP for > 5 mins Neurological Findings at Ventriculostomy Therapy for ICP Control CT Scan Outcome Grade † 1 1 postop ASD repair, 20 min; BP: 30–50 mm Hg, 2° cardiac arrest 38 48 hrs, ICP kept at 20–25 torr > 40 mm Hg pupils 3 mm & reactive; dolls eyes sign, intact corneal reflexes; decorticate venting, hyperventilation, Decadron, barbiturates, no mannitol bilat cerebral edema 5 2 48 intraop ruptured aorta, 40 min; BP: 20–50 mm Hg, 2° hypovolemia 20 5 days, ICP kept at 20–30 torr

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Rolf Gruber, Peter Jenny and Bruno Herzog

O bstruction of the ventricular catheter with fibrin, neuroglia, or plexus tissue is still the most frequent complication of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts in pediatric hydrocephalus 4, 8, 11, 12 The failure of customarily used shunt systems to inhibit chronic CSF overdrainage when the patient is mobilized is, in our experience, the major cause of this complication. 6 We believed that the patient's well-being might improve and the complication rate might be diminished by safeguarding the shunt system with a suction-inhibiting anti-siphon device (ASD

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.61.1.0149 Experiences with the anti-siphon device (ASD) in shunt therapy of pediatric hydrocephalus Rolf Gruber Peter Jenny Bruno Herzog July 1984 61 1 156 162 10.3171/jns.1984.61.1.0156 Congenital hemihypertrophy and abnormalities of the cerebral vasculature Edwin G. Fischer Roy D. Strand Frederic Shapiro July 1984 61 1 163 168 10.3171/jns.1984.61.1.0163 Multiple cerebral hemorrhages following chymopapain chemonucleolysis Reginald J. Davis Richard B. North James N. Campbell Richard A. Suss July 1984 61 1

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Letters to the Editor To The Editor John L. Fox , M.D. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 1157 1159 Having read the interesting article by Dr. Gruber and his colleagues (Gruber R, Jenny P, Herzog B: Experiences with the anti-siphon device (ASD) in shunt therapy of pediatric hydrocephalus. J Neurosurg 61: 156–162, July, 1984), I thought your readers might be interested in some of the brief history behind the anti-siphon valve, which was developed by Portnoy and Schulte. 5 After our earlier investigations into pressures

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Neurosurgical Forum: Letters to the Editor To The Editor John W. Holter , D.Sc. Bridgeport, Pennsylvania 791 791 The fine article by Gruber, et al. (Gruber R, Jenny P, Herzog B: Experiences with the anti-siphon device (ASD) in shunt therapy of pediatric hydrocephalus. J Neurosurg 61: 156–162, July, 1984) and the comments by Drs. Fox and Portnoy 1, 2 are well done. However, we believe there are a few points that should be clarified. First, in the scientific community we usually strive for accuracy in work

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Christian Sainte-Rose, Michael D. Hooven and Jean-François Hirsch

: Should “normalisation” of the ventricles be the goal of hydrocephalus therapy. Z Kinderchir 38 (Suppl 2): 80–83, 1983 33. Gruber R , Jenny P , Herzog B : Experiences with the antisiphon device (ASD) in shunt therapy of pediatric hydrocephalus. J Neurosurg 61 : 156 – 162 , 1984 Gruber R, Jenny P, Herzog B: Experiences with the antisiphon device (ASD) in shunt therapy of pediatric hydrocephalus. J Neurosurg 61: 156–162, 1984 34. Hakim S : Hydraulic and mechanical mis-matching of valve shunts used in

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Eldon L. Foltz and Jeff P. Blanks

Duration Symptoms & Signs Status of Ventricles on CT When Upright When Supine 1 44, F aqueductal stenosis VP, to-fro, ASD 4 yrs; 3 mos HA/N/V, diplopia relieved in 30 min normal 2 14, M communicating, lt cystic brain disease VP, on-off 10 yrs; 6 mos HA/N/V improvement in 30 min moderately enlarged 3 35, M aqueductal stenosis VP, Pudenz 5 yrs; 2 mos HA/N/V, blurred vision improvement in 15 min small 4 18, M aqueductal stenosis VP, to-fro 4 yrs; 12 mos HA/N/V, diplopia, paresis of