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  • Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine x
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Kei Watanabe, Kazuhiro Hasegawa and Kou Takano

24 : 1185 – 1189 , 1972 (Jpn) Shimizu Y, Imai T, Rai M, et al: [Two cases with fenestration of the vertebral artery.] No To Shinkei 24: 1185–1189, 1972 (Jpn) 15. Suzuki S , Tsuchita H , Kurokawa C , et al : New method of MVD using a vascular tape for neurovascular compression involving the vertebrobasilar artery—report of 2 cases. Neurol Med Chir 30 : 1020 – 1023 , 1990 Suzuki S, Tsuchita H, Kurokawa C, et al: New method of MVD using a vascular tape for neurovascular compression involving the

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Kuan-Wen Wu, Ming-Hsiao Hu, Shier-Chieg Huang, Ken N. Kuo and Shu-Hua Yang

response to excessive synovial fluid production in an arthritic joint or because of an increase in intraarticular pressure. Cystic protrusion may occur through the weaker portion of the joint capsule or the bursa itself. Second, a ganglionic cyst formed anteriorly can intersect muscle groups, and such cysts usually present as a palpable groin mass. Additionally, presentation of symptoms consistent with femoral neurovascular compression due to a mass effect in the femoral triangle serves to alert the physician to perform the appropriate examinations. The sciatic nerve

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Cervical radiculopathy, entrapment neuropathy, and thoracic outlet syndrome: how to differentiate?

Invited submission from the Joint Section Meeting on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves, March 2004

John E. McGillicuddy

: Natural history of brachial plexus neuropathy. Report on 99 patients. Arch Neurol 27: 109–117, 1972 29. Turner JWA , Parsonage MJ : Neuralgic amyotrophy (paralytic brachial neuritis) with special reference to prognosis. Lancet 2 : 209 – 212 , 1957 Turner JWA, Parsonage MJ: Neuralgic amyotrophy (paralytic brachial neuritis) with special reference to prognosis. Lancet 2: 209–212, 1957 30. Urschel HC Jr , Razzuk MA : Neurovascular compression in the thoracic outlet. Changing management over 50 years

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Rishi N. Sheth and James N. Campbell

first rib resections for thoracic outlet syndrome. Ann Vasc Surg 10 : 456 – 463 , 1996 Hempel GK, Shutze WP, Anderson JF, Bukhari HI: 770 consecutive supraclavicular first rib resections for thoracic outlet syndrome. Ann Vasc Surg 10: 456–463, 1996 16. Kashyap VS , Ahn SS , Machleder HI : Thoracic outlet neurovascular compression: approaches to anatomic decompression and their limitations. Semin Vasc Surg 11 : 116 – 122 , 1998 Kashyap VS, Ahn SS, Machleder HI: Thoracic outlet neurovascular compression

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Hiroshi Sakaida, Masahiko Okada and Akitaka Yamamoto

patient's radicular symptoms and dizziness resolved immediately after surgery. He was discharged with no neurological deficits after undergoing postoperative left VA angiography ( Fig. 4 ). There were no signs of recurrence within the 2-year follow-up period. Fig. 4. Postoperative left anteroposterior VA angiogram demonstrating the reconstructed VA (arrow) . Discussion Since Hadley 11 first reported the destructive change occurring in the VB caused by tortuosity of the VA, more than 30 cases of bone erosion, neurovascular compression, and/or VBI

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Juan S. Uribe, Jaya Kolla, Hesham Omar, Elias Dakwar, Naomi Abel, Devanand Mangar and Enrico Camporesi

gastric bypass, 5 hrs supine w/ arms on padded boards & abducted to 60º w/ 40º head up. numbness & weakness in bilat arms & rt Horner syndrome. 9 mos head-up position in obese pts w/o arm support is a risk factor for brachial plexus injury Kent & Cheney, 2007 1 32 M laparascopic sigmoid colectomy, 3 hrs supine w/ 20º head down & arms abducted to 60º, shoulder braces placed to prevent sliding bilat weakness & numbness in UEs 3.5 yrs w/o full recovery neurovascular compression manifested by difficulty in obtaining BP can be a consequence of

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Veit Braun and Hans-Peter Richter

., 8 and Dieckmann 9 have been promising as well. Thus far, no fatality has been reported. During the 1980s, in the era of increasing suspicion of neurovascular compression syndromes, neurosurgeons such as Freckmann and colleagues 10 and Jho and Jannetta 15 favored microvascular decompression of the spinal accessory nerve and the brainstem. To date, the theory that vascular compression of these structures is a cause of spasmodic torticollis remains very controversial. Therefore, the success of microvascular decompression as a curative treatment seems to be very