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Irving S. Cooper, Edward H. Rynearson, Collin S. MacCarty and Marschelle H. Power

metabolic sequelae of sufficient magnitude to result in death from malnutrition. The fact that injury to a small segment of the spinal cord may induce a greater catabolic reaction than the resection of a large volume of cerebral tissue also invites inquiry into the possibility that qualitative rather than quantitative factors determine the degree of catabolic activity after trauma to, or operation on the central nervous system. SUMMARY Patients undergoing craniotomy for brain tumor were observed to undergo a moderate catabolic reaction which was reflected in the

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Moses Ashkenazy, Loyal Davis and John Martin

the operator's hands, by the wearing of non-sterile gloves. Allowance, of course, is made for decay since production. The volume usually injected is between 0.7–3.0 cc. Depending upon the potency, a 1 cc., 2 cc., or 5 cc. syringe is used with a 20-gauge needle. To avoid bubbles of air, and for greater accuracy in dosage, the syringe should be “wetted” to above the required mark, with the radiofluorescein; then, the dye should be emptied into the container, and finally drawn back up the syringe to the designated volume for that day's dose. The routine precautions

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A. Torkildsen and K. Koppang

internal carotid artery on the diseased side can afford, and that a correspondingly additional volume under such circumstances is mobilised from above. In cases of bilateral occlusion of the internal carotid arteries, arterial blood may reach the cerebral hemispheres by means of the basilar artery. That life under such circumstances can be continued with comparatively few symptoms has been shown by an example published from this clinic by Frövig. 1 In discussing the sources from which arterial blood may reach the cerebral hemispheres, the interesting question of the

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Byron M. Bloor, Frank R. Wrenn Jr. and George J. Hayes

this same line. 1 It is desirable to objectively evaluate the effect of any contrast medium upon the function as well as structure of the brain. The present method of study combines the dye indicator technique with concomitant electroencephalography in an effort to obtain evidence of more subtle changes in cerebral physiology as well as correlative data. EXPERIMENTAL METHOD Adult rabbits were used in this study, since, of all common laboratory animals, they alone receive a significant volume of blood to the cerebral hemisphere through the internal carotid

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William Feiring, Emanuel H. Feiring and Leo M. Davidoff

revealed an eburnation and thickening of the roof of the left orbit as far back as the tuberculum sellae, the lesser wing of the sphenoid, and the reflection of the greater wing of the sphenoid on the lateral cranial vault. The edges of the thickened bone were smooth and the increase in density homogeneous ( Figs. 5 and 6 ). These changes had resulted in a diminution in volume of the left orbit. Undoubtedly the skull changes long antedated the injury. Diagnosis: Sphenoid wing meningioma. Figs. 5 and 6. Case 3 . Thickening of roof of left orbit and of sphenoid

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Robert Dean Woolsey

tendency to stagger on walking and true vertigo on leaning forward. The symptoms were especially prominent during the last 2½ weeks. Examination . Positive neurological findings were: nystagmus on looking to the right, markedly positive Romberg test, and staggering gait. Fundoscopic examination by the ophthalmological consultant revealed no abnormalities. RBC was 7,890,000; Hb. 21.1 gm. (136 per cent); hematocrit cell volume per cent 69. Leucocyte count was 6,850, with normal Schilling count; platelet count was 645,000. Repeated RBC was 7,820,000; Hb. 21.9 gm. (136

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Edgar F. Fincher

precipitate ruptures of the blood vessels. Queckenstedt's test at the time of the impulsive bleeding may be omitted because of the disturbing measurable increase in intracranial pressure as recorded on the attached spinal manometer cylinder. These manometric studies even in the hemorrhagic phase may be normal. Spinal fluid protein determinations in the acute condition are unreliable because of the volume of blood mixed with the spinal fluid. Spinal fluid studies, in the interval of freedom from lower extremity pains and headaches, can be perfectly normal both physically and

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Eldon L. Foltz, L. B. Thomas and A. A. Ward Jr.

Diodrast was maintained by a controlled temperature water bath. Cool solutions were maintained at 70°F., and warm solutions at 99.8°F. The injection time was kept constant for each case. The volume of Diodrast per injection was 2½ cc. for cats, 4 cc. for monkeys, and 10 cc. for humans. Adequate precautions were taken to maintain sterility and to guard the Diodrast solutions against light. Stellate blocks, when performed, were carried out with 1 per cent monocaine, using minimum volumes to obtain maximal homolateral pupillary constriction. RESULTS The effects of

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Orville T. Bailey, Wilfred T. Small and Franc D. Ingraham

would result. To be of clinical value, the procedure must cause no serious systemic effects or significant tissue destruction at the site of injection. The injection of procaine solution into the frontal white fibers has been accomplished safely in cats and monkeys. No untoward general reactions were detected unless the solution was inadvertently allowed to enter the subarachnoid space or ventricular system. When this occurred, an immediate fatality resulted. With improved technic, this complication was entirely obviated. The total volume of the cat's brain is so

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William P. Van Wagenen and C. T. Liu

, a little less garrulous and stated that for the first time in months she was able to sleep both during the day and at night with a little or no medication. The procedure was repeated 6 days later—again with a marked beneficial effect on her volume and content of complaints. After several days' observation, she wanted to go home because she “had certain housekeeping matters to take care of.” She was seen 2 months later and, according to her, she was sleeping well. She had gained 15 to 20 lbs. in weight and was not taking any drugs. A prefrontal lobotomy was not