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Lisa Millgård Sagberg, Christina Drewes, Asgeir S. Jakola and Ole Solheim

I n intracranial tumor surgery, patient selection in terms of surgical strategy, which tools to use, how much tissue to remove, and when to abstain from surgery is particularly important because the margins between good outcome and devastating deficits can be small. However, in the absence of practical and reliable prognostic tools, surgical management strategies continue to be based mainly on neurosurgeons' clinical judgment, which may be influenced by personal experience, knowledge, and perhaps even personality. Inaccurate predictions concerning the

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Edward R. Laws, Ian F. Parney, Wei Huang, Fred Anderson, Angel M. Morris, Anthony Asher, Kevin O. Lillehei, Mark Bernstein, Henry Brem, Andrew Sloan, Mitchel S. Berger, Susan Chang and Glioma Outcomes Investigators

T he optimal management for patients harboring malignant gliomas continues to be controversial, despite decades of intense clinical and basic science investigation. Malignant gliomas represent the most common primary brain tumor, and the impact of brain tumors in general on the public health has become of heightened interest in recent years. New prevalence data indicate that the number of patients living with some form of brain tumor may be as high as 30 per 100,000 in the US. 12 Current management strategies used for malignant glioma include surgery (either

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Evangelia Liouta, Christos Koutsarnakis, Faidon Liakos and George Stranjalis

meningioma surgery. According to recommendations from current outcomes research programs, neuropsychological-cognitive parameters also need to be incorporated to comprehensively evaluate surgical outcomes. Although meningiomas are extraaxial tumors, cognitive decline may arise due to perilesional edema and mass effect on normal cerebral tissue. Compared with healthy subjects, meningioma patients have reduced psychomotor speed and working memory 27 and attentional dysfunctions. 14 , 18 Furthermore, an association between neuropsychiatric symptoms and the occurrence of

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Ori Barzilai, Lily McLaughlin, Eric Lis, Yoshiya Yamada, Mark H. Bilsky and Ilya Laufer

revolutionized treatment algorithms. 4 Increased survival times have brought forth the need to evaluate current surgical outcomes to verify their efficacy and safety in long-term survivors. The current analysis evaluates outcomes in long-term cancer survivors after surgery for the treatment of spinal metastases. Methods Study Population This study was a retrospective chart and imaging review of cancer patients treated at a single, tertiary cancer center between January 2010 and December 2015. Patients were included in the analysis if they had a pathologically confirmed cancer

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Øystein P. Nygaard, Roar Kloster and Tore Solberg

disappeared. Recently researchers have demonstrated more long-term plastic changes in nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord, 1, 8, 11, 15, 16 underscoring that there may be a nocioceptive memory in the dorsal horn. Because these mechanisms probably need time to develop, the time of peripheral stimulation in primary afferent nerve fibers may be of importance for the development of chronic pain. In a previous retrospective study we have shown that duration of symptoms may be a predictor of patient outcome after surgery for lumbar disc herniation. 9 The aim of the

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Ashish Suri, Karanjit Singh Narang, Bhawani Shankar Sharma and Ashok Kumar Mahapatra

blindness, which may be uniocular or binocular, and if left untreated may progress to binocular blindness. Blindness is usually caused by optic nerve atrophy due to tumor compression, which is generally regarded as irreversible. 8 Our study focuses on this subset of patients with suprasellar tumors who presented with either uniocular or binocular blindness. We have tried to analyze the factors that may affect the visual outcome after surgery in these patients. This study is the largest in the existing medical literature to evaluate the factors affecting visual outcome

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Taylor E. Purvis, C. Rory Goodwin, Camilo A. Molina, Steven M. Frank and Daniel M. Sciubba

and hip surgery have demonstrated that restrictive transfusion “triggers” are associated with similar or better outcomes in patients when compared with liberal triggers. 6 , 7 , 17 , 20 We have previously shown that transfusion using a liberal trigger is associated with increased perioperative morbidity within spine surgery. 30 However, guidelines based on nadir Hb concentrations assume that the amount of acceptable blood loss does not vary by baseline Hb level and do not consider the range of potential Hb levels in the normal population. 23 Several studies in

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Takashi Iwabuchi, Shigeharu Suzuki, Kunihiko Ebina and Toshio Honma

A clip for use in intracranial aneurysm surgery should not only be nontoxic, small, light, effective, reliable, and easy to handle, but also removable. 1–3, 5–12 Recently we have devised a malleable, V-shaped, removable clip made of Nitinol, an alloy endowed with mechanical memory effect. 4 The clip is hand made at a temperature of 510° to 593°C; it is 0.4 × 0.7 mm in cross section, and 9 mm in length along the side of the V shape ( Fig. 1 ). Fig. 1. The clip applier and the hand-made memory clip. 1 = tips of the clip applier; 2 = front view of the

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Caroline Apra, Owais Kotbi, Guillaume Turc, Robert Corns, Mélanie Pagès, Raphaëlle Souillard-Scémama, Edouard Dezamis, Eduardo Parraga, Jean-François Meder, Xavier Sauvageon, Bertrand Devaux, Catherine Oppenheim and Johan Pallud

P atients who undergo neurosurgical procedures are at risk for perioperative deep venous thrombosis, especially in the case of intracranial surgery. The overall incidence of deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism has been reported to be between 6% and 50% in patients undergoing a craniotomy. 1 , 7 Therefore, prophylactic anticoagulation during the postoperative period is recommended, although it is estimated to increase the risk of intracranial hemorrhage from 1% to 11%. 1 , 14 Neurosurgical patients are also at risk for postoperative cerebral

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Todd D. Vogel, Courtney Pendleton, Alfredo Quinoñes-Hinojosa and Aaron A. Cohen-Gadol

As we have just seen, medical and other measures short of surgery offer so little, we are justified in taking even extreme measures, where less radical ones have proven unsatisfactory in providing relief from such a deforming and disabling condition. J ohn M. F inney 6 T he evolution of the surgical treatment for cervical dystonia has been intriguing, as the primary cause of this disease remains elusive. 12 Because of doubts related to the authenticity of an organic cause of dystonia, new surgical methods have been carefully examined. 13 Recent