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Head Injury John S. Meyer Akinori Kondo Fumio Nomura Ko Sakamoto Tetsuaki Teraura March 1970 32 3 304 319 10.3171/jns.1970.32.3.0304 Respiration and the Cerebrospinal Fluid in Experimental Cerebral Concussion Robert L. Grubb Jr. Ronald A. Naumann Ayub K. Ommaya March 1970 32 3 320 329 10.3171/jns.1970.32.3.0320 Prognostic Features in Recovery from Traumatic Decerebration Paul Gutterman Henry A. Shenkin March 1970 32 3 330 335 10.3171/jns.1970.32.3.0330 Functional Localization in the Trigeminal Ganglion in the Monkey Richard A. Lende Dennis A. Poulos

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Kamal Mousa Mira, Ibrahiem Abou Elnaga and Hassanein El-Sherif

trigeminal nerve, the trigeminal ganglion, and the two roots were removed en masse from the skull ( Fig. 1 ). Sections 5 µ thick were made and stained. Counting of the nerve fibers within the nerve bundles was carried out according to the technique of Schnitzlein and Foley. 6 The peripheral divisions were counted near the ganglion, while the human sensory root fibers were counted in the proximal, middle, and distal parts. The motor root fibers were counted near the pons and at the foramen ovale. Fig. 1. Diagram of the human trigeminal nerve (left side) showing

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F. P. Wirth Jr. and J. M. Van Buren

in the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, when compared to the mandibular or maxillary divisions, can be considered supportive evidence for these observations. 27, 28 There is also considerable anatomical and physiological evidence for overlap of pain pathways proximal to the trigeminal ganglion. Kerr 11 has shown in the cat and monkey that all divisions of the trigeminal nerve project to the most caudal levels of the spinal tract of the fifth cranial nerve. Anatomical study in the cat has also shown convergence of trigeminal fibers and fibers of the

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Lloyd S. Anderson, Richard G. Black, Jacob Abraham and Arthur A. Ward Jr.

studies of cortical neurons in chronic epileptogenic foci in the monkey. Exp Neurol 10: 285–295, 1964 2. Beaver DL , Moses HL , Ganote CE : Electron microscopy of the trigeminal ganglion. III. Trigeminal neuralgia. Arch Path (Chicago) 79 : 571 – 582 , 1965 Beaver DL, Moses HL, Ganote CE: Electron microscopy of the trigeminal ganglion. III. Trigeminal neuralgia. Arch Path (Chicago) 79: 571–582, 1965 3. Bernick S : Effect of aging on the nerve supply to human teeth. J Dent Res 46 : 694

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Kristin Gudmundsson, Albert L. Rhoton Jr. and Joseph G. Rushton

nerves except A in the left nerve ( lower ), the second division fibers comprised a greater portion of the medial than of the lateral portion of sensory root. Vascular loops course between the rootlets at the level of entry into the pons shown in all diagrams of both nerves except D in the right nerve ( upper ). Fig. 3. Magnified view of the trigeminal ganglion and root: ganglion is to the left, the posterior trigeminal root to the right. The broken line marks the junction between the root and ganglion. Significant anastomosis ( arrows ) between the

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Ronald F. Young and Robert B. King

. Amer J Anat 49 : 193 – 207 , 1931 Davenport HA, Ranson SW: Ratios of cells to fibers and of myelinated to unmyelinated fibers in spinal nerve roots. Amer J Anat 49: 193–207, 1931 9. Dixon AD : The ultrastructure of nerve fibers in the trigeminal ganglion of the rat. J Ultrastruct Res 8 : 107 – 121 , 1963 Dixon AD: The ultrastructure of nerve fibers in the trigeminal ganglion of the rat. J Ultrastruct Res 8: 107–121, 1963 10. Droegmueller WH : Sensory fibers in the spinal nerves of man. Anat

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William H. Sweet and James G. Wepsic

deficit in their patients following each of the necessary number of short periods of electrocoagulation, varying the position of the electrode until the desired effect is obtained. A recurrence rate of 24% was reduced to 7% by repeat procedures yielding a final success rate of 93% with no mortality and a low rate of complications. In general, modest injury to the trigeminal ganglion and rootlets has been shown to yield remarkably protracted relief from trigeminal neuralgia. This injury can be mechanical as in the compression operation of Sheldon, et al. , 19 thermal

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J. A. Johnston and Dwight Parkinson

, where it forms a medial and a lateral internal carotid plexus. The caroticotympanic and deep petrosal nerves arise from the lateral plexus within the carotid canal. The plexi enter the cavernous sinus through the foramen lacerum, maintaining the medial and lateral relationship to the carotid artery. Within the cavernous sinus, the lateral plexus sends filaments to the trigeminal ganglion and the sixth nerve, the medial sends filaments to the third, fourth, and sixth and the ophthalmic division of the fifth cranial nerves, the ciliary ganglion, and the pituitary gland

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Quality of Neurosurgical Training February 1974 40 2 10.3171/jns.1974.40.2.0279 Shunt Systems for Hydrocephalus February 1974 40 2 10.3171/jns.1974.40.2.0279a Effect of Steroids on CSF Flow February 1974 40 2 10.3171/jns.1974.40.2.0279b Controlled thermocoagulation of trigeminal ganglion and rootlets for differential destruction of pain fibers William H. Sweet James G. Wepsic February 1974 40 2 143 156 10.3171/jns.1974.40.2.0143 The treatment of penetrating wounds of the brain sustained in warfare E. Stephen Gurdjian

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Valmore A. Pelletier, Dennis A. Poulos and Richard A. Lende

commonly use the term “trigeminal root” to designate those bundles of fibers of the trigeminus that course between the trigeminal ganglion and the pons, but anatomists often include also under the designation “root” portions that lie within the central nervous system, such as the mesencephalic root. The names “motor root” and “sensory root” for the two principal portions are honored by widespread current and historical usage. The terms “dorsal root” and “posterior root” when applied to the trigeminal system refer only to the sensory root. These terms express location