Search Results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 9,955 items for :

Clear All
Restricted access

W. M. Lougheed, W. H. Sweet, J. C. White and W. R. Brewster

and total CO 2 content (volume per cent) were done and the pressure of CO 2 in the serum, pCO 2 , was calculated from the Singers-Hastings nomogram. The serum pH was determined by the colorimetric technique of Hastings and Sendroy at a bath temperature identical to the patient's body temperature rather than the usual 88°C. bath temperature. No striking changes occurred. Both patients ventilated spontaneously throughout the cooling procedures; and the absence of major hyperventilating manoeuvers by the anaesthesiologist contributed to the stability of the pH

Restricted access

Román Arana-Iñiguez and Jorge San Julián

similar to those observed in hydrocephalus. The arteries, which Moniz 24 described as “spider legs,” have an even diameter throughout their course. 3) There is an enormous displacement of the vessels. Hydatid cysts attain a volume hardly ever exhibited by tumors, although supratentorial tumors in children may attain a huge size, too. 7 4) The circumferential arrangement of the vessels about the spherical mass is strongly diagnostic of a hydatid cyst. The above characteristics enabled us to arrive at the diagnosis of hydatid cyst in 6 of our 10

Restricted access

Purdue L. Gould, William T. Peyton and Lyle A. French

except during the actual injection. A small bulldog clamp was placed on the artery distal to the entrance of the needle to prevent peripheral flow of the contrast medium. The clamp was removed between injections. The amount of the contrast medium (35 per cent Diodrast) used varied according to the size and age of the patient. A volume of 8 cc. was sufficient for adequate filling in the 7- month-old child, and 15 to 18 cc. was used in the older children. In the adults, as much as 30 cc. was injected but the average was approximately 20 cc. The dye was injected as

Restricted access

E. H. Botterell, W. M. Lougheed, J. W. Scott and S. L. Vandewater

patients promptly in the acute phase. Brain Volume—Cerebral Swelling At 30°C. (86°F.) and below, the brain usually has been “slack” unless there is a sizeable intracerebral clot or cerebral swelling secondary to intracerebral clot or cerebral softening. We have been misled on occasion by this decrease in brain volume. It was judged necessary to resect the frontal lobe only once in the course of operation in 10 cases of anterior cerebral-anterior communicating aneurysms. Re-exploration with frontal lobe resection became necessary in 2 of these cases, and in a third

Restricted access

Burton L. Wise

In these instances, it was subsequently demonstrated that the hypophysectomy was incomplete, whereas autopsies in 5 of the 9 cases in which diabetes insipidus did not develop confirmed complete removal of the pituitary. Luft 12 reported that following hypophysectomy in the human, cortisone induced polyuria of low specific gravity and polydipsia, which subsided if cortisone was withdrawn. However, the polyuria tended to disappear in 4 to 5 months, even if cortisone was continued. Desoxycorticosterone caused a three-fold increase in the urinary volume of a patient

Restricted access

H. de Villiers Hammann

ventricular outline. A diagnosis of pituitary adenoma was made. Operation . On June 16, 1953, under general anaesthesia, the region of the optic chiasm was exposed via a left transfrontal approach. The bluish capsule of a tumour mass was evident and, after coagulation of the capsule, an incision was made and the tumour was removed by suction and spoon. After the major portion of the tumour had been removed, the bed was scraped with a spoon, and a sudden welling of thick yellow pus in the tumour bed occurred. The total volume of pus aspirated was 5 cc. Complete evacuation

Restricted access

Subdural Collections of Fluid in Infants and Children

II. Study with Radioactive Sodium Phosphate (P-32)

R. M. N. Crosby and Robert E. Bauer

removals of the capsules are separated by at least 10 days. The radioactive phosphorus study was done between the 2nd and 6th fontanelle tap and always before trephination. One to 200 microcuries of radioactive phosphorus (P-32) as sodium phosphate in a volume of 1 to 2 ml. was injected intravenously. Samples of subdural fluid and blood were obtained 3 hours later. Whole blood was mixed with ammonium and potassium oxalate and the plasma was separated. Subdural fluid was centrifuged. Duplicate 1 ml. aliquots of plasma and subdural supernate were placed in 2 ml. glass

Restricted access

Nils Lundberg, Kai C. Nielsen and Eric Nilsson

. Diagram illustrating the interplay of different factors suggested as possibly producing increased intracranial pressure and brain swelling. The interrelationships apparent from the diagram suggest that hypothermia might be able to diminish or counteract swelling of the brain by diminishing the risk of general hypoxia and decreasing the cerebral blood pressure and blood flow. The above-mentioned studies on cerebral blood flow in hypotension induced by ganglioplegic agents indicate that these agents do not produce any decrease in the volume of the brain. This is

Restricted access

Burton L. Wise

day of operation and the 1st postoperative day, the patient received 4000 ml. of water, intravenously, but only 39 mEq. of sodium. The exact urinary output on the 1st postoperative day is not known, but it was small. For the 2 days, the urinary output was probably not more than 800 ml. Allowing for an insensible water loss of 600 to 850 ml. per day, 22 the patient retained between 1.5 and 2 liters of water in this 2-day period, with less than 40 mEq. of sodium. As soon as the sodium intake was increased and the urinary volume increased, the serum sodium

Restricted access

B. Selverstone, R. H. P. Yuan and C. V. Robinson

. Barrel, B, is smooth-bore glass (interchangeable) with metal Luer tip. Plunger consists of Teflon end, T, and tubular stainless steel handle, H, joined by a pin, P. Fig. 2 shows two of these syringes. The 20 cc. syringe has the advantage of a shorter stroke for the same volume of fluid. Fig. 2. Twenty cc. syringe and 10 cc. syringe with finger rings. These syringes withstand ordinary use, including steam sterilization. Because of the large coefficient of thermal expansion of Teflon, it is necessary that the plunger and barrel be separated for