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Yusuf Izci, Yusuf Tüzün, Halil Ibrahim Seçer and Engin Gönül

reducing the risk of spillage during surgery), and reduce the recurrence rate. 4 , 8 , 11 , 12 We retrospectively reviewed our experience with cerebral hydatid cysts and attempted to show the pitfalls of surgical treatment. Our goal was to ascertain whether this technique is the optimal method for the treatment of cerebral hydatid cysts. Clinical Materials and Methods Patient Population Between 1993 and 2007, 17 patients underwent surgical management for cerebral hydatid cysts at the Departments of Neurosurgery of Gulhane Military Medical Academy and Ataturk

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V. Balasubramaniam, T. S. Kanaka and P. B. Ramanujam

years of life. The management of this disease and its attendant symptoms by stereotaxic surgery probably dates back to 1960, and the pioneering work of Narabayashi, 20 but no unanimity of opinion exists as to the value of stereotaxic surgery in cerebral palsy. At first these cases were treated by pallidotomy, but later the thalamus was the target area. 12, 14, 16, 18, 19, 23 Clinical Material This report is based on 94 cases of cerebral palsy operated on between 1967 and 1971 at the Institute of Neurology, Madras. All cases were studied independently by two

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Ji Hoon Phi, Byung-Kyu Cho, Kyu-Chang Wang, Ji Yeoun Lee, Yong Seung Hwang, Ki Joong Kim, Jong-Hee Chae, In-One Kim, Sung-Hye Park and Seung-Ki Kim

I ntractable epilepsy in children is a serious condition that handicaps the afflicted individual in every aspect of life. 1 The physical, psychological, and social life of the patients deteriorate rapidly with continuing seizures. Epilepsy surgery can be a remedy for intractable epilepsy in carefully selected patients. 31 One characteristic of pediatric epilepsy is that developmental lesions predominate as the cause of the disease. Focal cortical dysplasia is the most common developmental lesion responsible for intractable epilepsy in children. 26

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Alireza Mansouri, Shervin Taslimi, Aram Abbasian, Jetan H. Badhiwala, Muhammad Ali Akbar, Naif M. Alotaibi, Saleh A. Almenawer, Alexander G. Weil, Aria Fallah, Lionel Carmant and George M. Ibrahim

T he burden of epilepsy is disproportionately weighted toward low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and active epilepsy is associated with higher rates of mortality and biopsychosocial issues. 6 , 11 , 25 Accordingly, the World Health Organization has ranked epilepsy as the second most burdensome neurological ailment. 39 Although first-line management is medical therapy, approximately one-third of patients have medically intractable epilepsy (MIE), one-third of whom benefit from surgery. 44 , 51 , 52 For instance, patients with MIE due to temporal lobe

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Paul E. Kaloostian, Jennifer E. Kim, Ali Bydon, Daniel M. Sciubba, Jean-Paul Wolinsky, Ziya L. Gokaslan and Timothy F. Witham

I ntracranial hemorrhage is an extremely rare complication of spinal surgery, with fewer than 35 individual cases reported in the literature and a proposed incidence rate of 0.8%. 6 , 11 The etiology of remote ICH remains unclear, but evidence suggests that it is caused by excessive CSF loss, which results in cerebral dehydration causing stretching and eventually tearing of the bridging veins. The postoperative hemorrhage may be classified as cerebellar hemorrhage (CBH), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), subdural hemorrhage (SDH), or intraventricular

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Michael E. Sughrue, Martin J. Rutkowski, Gopal Shangari, H. Quinn Chang, Andrew T. Parsa, Mitchel S. Berger and Michael W. McDermott

years, many patients with lesions large enough to require surgical intervention are older and as a result have preexisting medical conditions. 5 , 6 The surgical and neurological risks for various meningioma surgeries have already been reported, 3 , 4 , 11 , 22 but much less effort has been expended in studying the rates of serious medical complications following meningioma surgery. In the absence of such data, 2 potential hypotheses could be formulated regarding the rigors of meningioma surgery in “medically at-risk” patients. On the one hand, it is well known

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Sharad Rajpal, R. Shane Tubbs, Timothy George, W. Jerry Oakes, Herbert E. Fuchs, Mark N. Hadley and Bermans J. Iskandar

Methods Patient Population The authors reviewed the medical records of 61 adult patients with congenital TCS who underwent surgery between January 1994 and April 2003. The study population consisted of patients with congenital, not acquired, spinal cord tethering, and therefore any patient presenting with post–myelomeningocele tethered cord was excluded. All patients were treated at one of three institutions: the University of Wisconsin Medical School, Duke University, or the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Only patients over 17 years of age were included

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Robert L. Grubb Jr., William J. Powers, Colin P. Derdeyn, Harold P. Adams Jr. and William R. Clarke

The Carotid Occlusion Surgery Study is supported by National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke Grant No. 42167.

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Ercole Galassi, Eugenio Pozzati, Massimo Poppi and Attilio Vinci

C erebral aspergillosis is an unusual disease. About 80 cases have been reported in the literature; however, all authors agree that there has been an increase in the incidence of this infection in recent years. In fact, between 1897, when Oppe 18 reported the first case, and 1950 only 12 cases were reported; all the others have been noted subsequently. We are describing a case of cerebral aspergillosis that we encountered in a patient who had undergone intracranial surgery. Case Report This 59-year-old woman who had suffered from diabetes mellitus for

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Dean S. Louis, Thomas L. Greene and Raymond C. Noellert

than 70 years following the observations of Marie and Foix, and more than 40 years after the first surgical experience of Learmonth with CTS, sufficient experience has accumulated 1–3, 5, 6, 10, 12–16 to consider the results of our surgical endeavors. Clearly not all individuals who present with CTS require operative surgical management. Rest, splinting, and anti-inflammatory medications are all of value, but to varying degrees. When surgery is indicated for CTS, it is important to remember that significant complications may result if great care is not exercised