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Xiao-hui Ren, Chun Chu, Chun Zeng, Yong-ji Tian, Zhen-yu Ma, Kai Tang, Lan-bing Yu, Xiang-li Cui, Zhong-cheng Wang and Song Lin

Object

Intracranial epidermoid cysts are rare, potentially curable, benign lesions that are sometimes associated with severe postoperative complications, including hemorrhage. Delayed hemorrhage, defined as one that occurred after an initial unremarkable postoperative CT scan, contributed to most cases of postoperative hemorrhage in patients with epidermoid cyst. In this study, the authors focus on delayed hemorrhage as one of the severe postoperative complications in epidermoid cyst, report its incidence and its clinical features, and analyze related clinical parameters.

Methods

There were 428 cases of intracranial epidermoid cysts that were surgically treated between 2002 and 2008 in Beijing Tiantan Hospital, and these were retrospectively reviewed. Among them, the cases with delayed postoperative hemorrhage were chosen for analysis. Clinical parameters were recorded, including the patient's age and sex, the chief surgeon's experience in neurosurgery, the year in which the operation was performed, tumor size, adhesion to neurovascular structures, and degree of resection. These parameters were compared in patients with and without delayed postoperative hemorrhage to identify risk factors associated with this entity.

Results

The incidences of postoperative hemorrhage and delayed postoperative hemorrhage in patients with epidermoid cyst were 5.61% (24 of 428) and 4.91% (21 of 428), respectively, both of which were significantly higher than that of postoperative hemorrhage in all concurrently treated intracranial tumors, which was 0.91% (122 of 13,479). The onset of delayed postoperative hemorrhage ranged from the 5th to 23rd day after the operation; the median time of onset was the 8th day. The onset manifestation included signs of intracranial hypertension and/or meningeal irritation (71.4%), brain herniation (14.3%), seizures (9.5%), and syncope (4.8%). Neuroimages revealed hematoma in 11 cases and subarachnoid hemorrhage in 10 cases. The rehemorrhage rate was 38.1% (8 of 21). The mortality rate for delayed postoperative hemorrhage was 28.6% (6 of 21). None of the clinical parameters was correlated with delayed postoperative hemorrhage (p > 0.05), despite a relatively lower p value for adhesion to neurovascular structures (p = 0.096).

Conclusions

Delayed postoperative hemorrhage contributed to most of the postoperative hemorrhages in patients with intracranial epidermoid cysts and was a unique postoperative complication with unfavorable outcomes. Adhesion to neurovascular structures was possibly related to delayed postoperative hemorrhage (p = 0.096).

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Ya-Bin Ji, Yong-Ming Wu, Zhong Ji, Wei Song, Sui-Yi Xu, Yao Wang and Su-Yue Pan

Object

Intracarotid artery cold saline infusion (ICSI) is an effective method for protecting brain tissue, but its use is limited because of undesirable secondary effects, such as severe decreases in hematocrit levels, as well as its relatively brief duration. In this study, the authors describe and investigate the effects of a novel ICSI pattern (interrupted ICSI) relative to the traditional method (uninterrupted ICSI).

Methods

Ischemic strokes were induced in 85 male Sprague-Dawley rats by occluding the middle cerebral artery for 3 hours using an intraluminal filament. Uninterrupted infusion groups received an infusion at 15 ml/hour for 30 minutes continuously. The same infusion speed was used in the interrupted infusion groups, but the whole duration was divided into trisections, and there was a 20-minute interval without infusion between sections. Forty-eight hours after reperfusion, H & E and silver nitrate staining were utilized for morphological assessment. Infarct sizes and brain water contents were determined using H & E staining and the dry-wet weight method, respectively. Levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100β protein, and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) in the serum were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Neurological deficits were also evaluated.

Results

Histology showed that interrupted ICSI did not affect neurons or fibers in rat brains, which suggests that this method is safe for brain tissues with ischemia. The duration of hypothermia induced by interrupted ICSI was longer than that induced via the traditional method, and the decrease in hematocrit levels was less pronounced. There were no differences in infarct size or brain water content between uninterrupted and interrupted ICSI groups, but neuron-specific enolase and matrix metalloproteinase 9 serum levels were more reduced after interrupted ICSI than after the traditional method.

Conclusions

Interrupted ICSI is a safe method. Compared with traditional ICSI, the interrupted method has a longer duration of hypothermia and less effect on hematocrit and offers more potentially improved neuroprotection, thereby making it more attractive as an infusion technique in the clinic.

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Yizhi Liu, Jiaoxue Qiu, Zhong Wang, Wanchun You, Lingyun Wu, Chengyuan Ji and Gang Chen

OBJECT

Oxidative stress and the inflammatory response are thought to promote brain damage in the setting of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Previous reports have shown that dimethylfumarate (DMF) can activate the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1–nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2–antioxidant-responsive element (Keap1-Nrf2-ARE) system in vivo and in vitro, which leads to the downregulation of oxidative stress and inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential neuroprotective effect of DMF on SAH-induced brain injury in rats.

METHODS

Rats were subjected to SAH by the injection of 300 μl of autologous blood into the chiasmatic cistern. Rats in a DMF-treated group were given 15 mg/kg DMF twice daily by oral gavage for 2 days after the onset of SAH. Cortical apoptosis, neural necrosis, brain edema, blood-brain barrier impairment, learning deficits, and changes in the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway were assessed.

RESULTS

Administration of DMF significantly ameliorated the early brain injury and learning deficits induced by SAH in this animal model. Treatment with DMF markedly upregulated the expressions of agents related to Keap1-Nrf2-ARE signaling after SAH. The inflammatory response and oxidative stress were downregulated by DMF therapy.

CONCLUSIONS

DMF administration resulted in abatement of the development of early brain injury and cognitive dysfunction in this prechiasmatic cistern SAH model. This result was probably mediated by the effect of DMF on the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE system.

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Song-Bai Gui, Sheng-Yuan Yu, Lei Cao, Ji-wei Bai, Xin-Sheng Wang, Chu-Zhong Li and Ya-Zhuo Zhang

OBJECTIVE

At present, endoscopic treatment is advised as the first procedure in cases of suprasellar arachnoid cysts (SSCs) with hydrocephalus. However, the appropriate therapy for SSCs without hydrocephalus has not been fully determined yet because such cases are very rare and because it is usually difficult to perform the neuroendoscopic procedure in patients without ventriculomegaly given difficulties with ventricular cannulation and the narrow foramen of Monro. The purpose of this study was to find out the value of navigation-guided neuroendoscopic ventriculocystocisternostomy (VCC) for SSCs without lateral ventriculomegaly.

METHODS

Five consecutive patients with SSC without hydrocephalus were surgically treated using endoscopic fenestration (VCC) guided by navigation between March 2014 and November 2015. The surgical technique, success rate, and patient outcomes were assessed and compared with those from hydrocephalic patients managed in a similar fashion.

RESULTS

The small ventricles were successfully cannulated using navigational tracking, and the VCC was accomplished in all patients. There were no operative complications related to the endoscopic procedure. In all patients the SSC decreased in size and symptoms improved postoperatively (mean follow-up 10.4 months).

CONCLUSIONS

Endoscopic VCC can be performed as an effective, safe, and simple treatment option by using intraoperative image-based neuronavigation in SSC patients without hydrocephalus. The image-guided neuroendoscopic procedure improved the accuracy of the endoscopic approach and minimized brain trauma. The absence of hydrocephalus in patients with SSC may not be a contraindication to endoscopic treatment.