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Zhipeng Chen, Shuizhong Cen, Jionglin Wu, Rui Guo, Zhenhua Liu, and Liangbin Gao

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to compare a traditional cervical cage with a zero-profile (ZP) fixation device in patients who underwent three-level anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) in terms of patient-reported outcomes (visual analog scale [VAS], Japanese Orthopaedic Association [JOA], and Neck Disability Index [NDI] scores), radiographic findings (sagittal alignment 2 years after surgery and likelihood of fusion), and complications.

METHODS

This study was a retrospective case series. Between January 2012 and December 2016, 58 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) who required three-level ACDF procedures, as identified by spinal surgeons, were treated with three-level ACDF and an anterior cage-plate construct (ACPC) (n = 38) or a three-level stand-alone ZP device (n = 20). On the basis of patient choice, patients were divided into two groups (ACPC group and ZP group). All patients completed a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. Patient-reported outcome scores included VAS, JOA, and NDI scores. The radiographic findings included sagittal alignment and likelihood of fusion 2 years after surgery. Data related to patient-reported outcomes and sagittal alignment were collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and at the final follow-up. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were also documented and analyzed.

RESULTS

The clinical outcomes, including VAS, JOA, and NDI scores, showed improvement in both groups, and no significant difference was observed between the two groups. Sagittal alignment and height of the fused segments were restored in all patients. However, the authors found no differences between the ZP and ACPC groups, and the groups exhibited similar fusion rates. The authors found no differences in complications, including dysphagia, adjacent-segment degeneration, and postoperative hematoma, between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Use of ZP implants yielded satisfactory long-term clinical and radiological outcomes that were similar to those of the standard ACPC. Additionally, the rates of complications between the groups were not significantly different. Although the best surgical option for multilevel CSM remains controversial, the results of this work suggest that ACDF with the ZP device is feasible, safe, and effective, even for multilevel CSM.

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Qi Jia, Xin Gao, Zhenhua Zhou, Bin Lan, Jian Zhao, Tielong Liu, Xinghai Yang, Haifeng Wei, and Jianru Xiao

OBJECTIVE

Spinal instability or neurological impairment caused by spinal brown tumors (BTs) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an acute condition that needs urgent surgery. There is not much published information on BTs of the mobile spine given the rarity of the disease, and the literature shows inconsistent treatment options and ambiguous follow-up information. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the clinical features, anesthesia management, and surgical treatment for this rare disease through long-term follow-up observations.

METHODS

Clinical, laboratory, radiological, and perioperative data on 6 consecutive patients with spinal BTs who had been admitted to the authors’ institution between 2010 and 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The literature on spinal BT with secondary hyperparathyroidism was also reviewed. Summaries of the clinical features and anesthesia management are provided.

RESULTS

The mean age of the 6 patients was 45.5 years (range 35–62 years). Lesions were located in the cervical segment (2 cases) and thoracic segment (4 cases). Localized pain was the most common complaint, and pathological fracture occurred in 5 patients. Elevation of serum alkaline phosphate (AKP) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) was a common phenomenon. Four patients underwent circumferential resection and 2 underwent laminectomy, with parathyroidectomy performed in all patients. The anesthesia process was uneventful for all patients. The mean follow-up was 33 months (range 26–40 months). No spinal lesion progression occurred in any patient. The Karnofsky Performance Status score improved to 80–90 by 3 months after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Although uncommon, spinal BTs should be a diagnostic consideration in patients with ESRD. The thoracic spine is the most frequently affected site. ESRD is not a contraindication for surgery; with the assistance of experienced anesthesiologists, urgent surgery is the preferred option to alleviate neurological impairment and restore spinal stability.

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Tao Zhang, Zhenhua Li, Weiming Gong, Bingwei Sun, Shuheng Liu, Kai Zhang, Dezhen Yin, Peng Xu, and Tanghong Jia

Object.

The authors assessed the efficacy of computed tomography (CT)–guided percutaneous injection of fibrin glue to treat meningeal cysts of the sacral spine in patients with back pain, and evaluated the necessity for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) aspiration before glue injection.

Methods.

Of the 31 patients in this study, 15 underwent injection of fibrin glue under CT guidance after aspiration of more than 15 ml of CSF (Group A), and 16 patients were treated with the glue but without CSF aspiration (Group B). Clinical results were evaluated after an average of 23 months of follow-up, and changes on the imaging studies were also evaluated. The clinical outcome and postoperative complications were analyzed.

Results.

All 31 patients experienced resolution or marked improvement of symptoms for as long as 28 months after fibrin glue therapy. No patient experienced recurrence of symptoms during the follow-up interval. The postoperative pain relief was statistically significant (p < 0.001) according to evaluations in which a 100-mm visual analog pain scale was used. There were no statistical differences between the two groups (p > 0.05).

Conclusions.

Percutaneous CT-guided fibrin glue therapy for sacral arachnoid cysts may be a definitive therapy. It is unnecessary to aspirate the CSF before injection of the fibrin glue.