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  • Author or Editor: Yuichiro Hayashi x
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Yohei Kitamura, Takenori Akiyama, Hikaru Sasaki, Yuichiro Hayashi and Kazunari Yoshida

Meningiomas rarely cause CSF dissemination, and CSF seeding to the optic nerve (ON) is extremely rare. This is the first report of 2 cases of atypical meningioma with subacute visual loss due to ON seeding. The authors present the genetic characteristics of these atypical meningiomas with CSF dissemination. The patient in Case 1 was a 36-year-old woman with a 1.5-cm mass within the left ON, and the patient in Case 2 was a 70-year-old woman with a 0.9-cm mass around the right ON. Both individuals had undergone multiple surgeries for primary lesions and local recurrent lesions. They presented with subacute visual loss, and both tumors were completely resected. The pathological diagnosis was atypical meningioma with high MIB-1 indices and p53-positive cell ratios in each case. Comparative genomic hybridization showed significant chromosomal copy number alterations similar to the results of previous surgeries, confirming that the tumors were disseminated lesions. The present findings suggest that genetic characteristics, such as 1p and 10qcen-23 losses and 17q and 20 gains, shared by the 2 cases might be associated with CSF dissemination of meningiomas.

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Masazumi Fujii, Satoshi Maesawa, Kazuya Motomura, Miyako Futamura, Yuichiro Hayashi, Itsuko Koba and Toshihiko Wakabayashi

OBJECT

The deep frontal pathway connecting the superior frontal gyrus to Broca's area, recently named the frontal aslant tract (FAT), is assumed to be associated with language functions, especially speech initiation and spontaneity. Injury to the deep frontal lobe is known to cause aphasia that mimics the aphasia caused by damage to the supplementary motor area. Although fiber dissection and tractography have revealed the existence of the tract, little is known about its function. The aim of this study was to determine the function of the FAT via electrical stimulation in patients with glioma who underwent awake surgery.

METHODS

The authors analyzed the data from subcortical mapping with electrical stimulation in 5 consecutive cases (3 males and 2 females, age range 40–54 years) with gliomas in the left frontal lobe. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and tractography of the FAT were performed in all cases. A navigation system and intraoperative MRI were used in all cases. During the awake phase of the surgery, cortical mapping was performed to find the precentral gyrus and Broca's area, followed by tumor resection. After the cortical layer was removed, subcortical mapping was performed to assess language-associated fibers in the white matter.

RESULTS

In all 5 cases, positive responses were obtained at the stimulation sites in the subcortical area adjacent to the FAT, which was visualized by the navigation system. Speech arrest was observed in 4 cases, and remarkably slow speech and conversation was observed in 1 case. The location of these sites was also determined on intraoperative MR images and estimated on preoperative MR images with DTI tractography, confirming the spatial relationships among the stimulation sites and white matter tracts. Tumor removal was successfully performed without damage to this tract, and language function did not deteriorate in any of the cases postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors identified the left FAT and confirmed that it was associated with language functions. This tract should be recognized by clinicians to preserve language function during brain tumor surgery, especially for tumors located in the deep frontal lobe on the language-dominant side.

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Satoshi Maesawa, Masazumi Fujii, Miyako Futamura, Yuichiro Hayashi, Kentaro Iijima and Toshihiko Wakabayashi

Few studies have examined the clinical characteristics of patients with lesions in the deep parietal operculum facing the sylvian fissure, the region recognized as the secondary somatosensory area (SII). Moreover, surgical approaches in this region are challenging. In this paper the authors report on a patient presenting with SII epilepsy with a tumor in the left deep parietal operculum. The patient was a 24-year-old man who suffered daily partial seizures with extremely uncomfortable dysesthesia and/or occasional pain on his right side. MRI revealed a tumor in the medial aspect of the anterior transverse parietal gyrus, surrounding the posterior insular point. Long-term video electroencephalography monitoring with scalp electrodes failed to show relevant changes to seizures. Resection with cortical and subcortical mapping under awake conditions was performed. A negative response to stimulation was observed at the subcentral gyrus during language and somatosensory tasks; thus, the transcortical approach (specifically, a transsubcentral gyral approach) was used through this region. Subcortical stimulation at the medial aspect of the anterior parietal gyrus and the posterior insula around the posterior insular point elicited strong dysesthesia and pain in his right side, similar to manifestation of his seizure. The tumor was completely removed and pathologically diagnosed as pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma. His epilepsy disappeared without neurological deterioration postoperatively. In this case study, 3 points are clinically significant. First, the clinical manifestation of this case was quite rare, although still representative of SII epilepsy. Second, the location of the lesion made surgical removal challenging, and the transsubcentral gyral approach was useful when intraoperative mapping was performed during awake surgery. Third, intraoperative mapping demonstrated that the patient experienced pain with electrical stimulation around the posterior insular point. Thus, this report demonstrated the safe and effective use of the transsubcentral gyral approach during awake surgery to resect deep parietal opercular lesions, clarified electrophysiological characteristics in the SII area, and achieved successful tumor resection with good control of epilepsy.