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Jaechan Park, Wonsoo Son, Youngseok Kwak and Boram Ohk

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the level of patient satisfaction and approach-related patient complaints between a superciliary keyhole approach and a pterional approach.

METHODS

Patients who underwent an ipsilateral superciliary keyhole approach and a contralateral pterional approach for bilateral intracranial aneurysms during an 11-year period were contacted and asked to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire. The questionnaire covered 5 complaint areas related to the surgical approaches: craniotomy-related pain, sensory symptoms in the head, cosmetic complaints, palpable cranial irregularities, and limited mouth opening. The patients were asked to rate the 5 complaint areas on a scale from 0 (asymptomatic or very pleasant) to 4 (severely symptomatic or very unpleasant). Finally, the patients were asked to rate the level of overall satisfaction related to each surgical procedure on a visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 (most unsatisfactory) to 100 (most satisfactory).

RESULTS

A total of 21 patients completed the patient satisfaction questionnaire during a follow-up clinic visit. For the superciliary procedures, no craniotomy-related pain, palpable irregularities, or limited mouth opening was reported, and only minor sensory symptoms (numbness in the forehead) and cosmetic complaints (short linear operative scar) were reported (score = 1) by 1 (4.8%) and 3 patients (14.3%), respectively. Compared with the pterional approach, the superciliary approach showed better outcomes regarding the incidence of craniotomy-related pain, cosmetic complaints, and palpable irregularities, with a significant between-approach difference (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the VAS score for patient satisfaction was significantly higher for the superciliary approach (mean 95.2 ± 6.0 [SD], range 80–100) than for the pterional approach (mean 71.4 ± 10.6, range 50–90). Moreover, for the pterional approach, a multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the crucial factors decreasing the level of patient satisfaction were cosmetic complaints, craniotomy-related pain, and sensory symptoms, in order of importance (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

In successful cases in which the primary surgical goal of complete aneurysm clipping without postoperative complications is achieved, a superciliary keyhole approach provides a much higher level of patient satisfaction than a pterional approach, despite a facial wound. For a pterional approach, the patient satisfaction level is affected by the cosmetic results, craniotomy-related pain, and numbness behind the hairline, in order of importance.

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Youngseok Kwak, Wonsoo Son, Yong-Sun Kim, Jaechan Park and Dong-Hun Kang

OBJECTIVE

The authors evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of MRA in identifying the shape of small-sized unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

METHODS

Small (< 7 mm) unruptured intracranial aneurysms initially detected by MRA and confirmed by DSA between January 2017 and December 2018 were morphologically reviewed by neuroradiologists. Regularity or irregularity of aneurysm shape was analyzed by two independent reviewers using MRA without DSA results. DSA findings served as the reference standard for aneurysm shape. Irregular shape, which in small aneurysms is associated with a higher likelihood of rupture, was defined as positive, and MRA sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined by using evaluations based on location, size, and MRA magnetic strength (1.5T vs 3T MRA). Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors for false-negative MRA results for irregularly shaped aneurysms.

RESULTS

In total, 652 unruptured intracranial aneurysms in 530 patients were reviewed for this study. For detecting aneurysm shape irregularity, the overall MRA sensitivity was 60.4% for reviewer 1 and 60.9% for reviewer 2. Anterior cerebral artery aneurysms had the lowest sensitivity for location (36.7% for reviewer 1, 46.9% for reviewer 2); aneurysms sized < 3 mm had the lowest sensitivity for size (26.7% for both reviewers); and 1.5T MRA had lower sensitivity and accuracy than 3T MRA. In multivariate analysis, location, size, and magnetic strength of MRA were independent risk factors for false-negative MRA results for irregularly shaped aneurysms.

CONCLUSIONS

MRA had a low sensitivity for detecting the irregular shape of small intracranial aneurysms. In particular, anterior cerebral artery location, aneurysm size < 3 mm, and detection with 1.5T MRA were associated with a higher risk of irregularly shaped aneurysms being misjudged as regular.