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  • Author or Editor: Yoshihiro Matsumoto x
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Tsuyoshi Matsumoto, Eiichi Tani, Keizo Kaba, Nobuo Kochi, Hideki Shindo, Yoshihiro Yamamoto, Hiromi Sakamoto and Junichi Furuyama

✓ Two human glioma cell lines were examined for multidrug resistance (MDR). A vincristine (VCR)-resistant glioma cell line showed a cross resistance to Adriamycin (doxorubicin, ADR) and etoposide (VP-16) to varying extents, suggesting the presence of MDR; the resistance to VCR was considerably decreased by calcium entry blockers. On the other hand, another VCR-sensitive glioma cell line exhibited no cross resistance to ADR or VP-16. Double minute chromosomes and homogeneously staining regions as well as clonal aberrations of chromosome 7 were not observed in cytogenetic studies of multidrug-resistant and multidrug-sensitive glioma cell lines. In Northern and Southern blot analyses, MDR gene 1 (MDR1) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) was shown to be overexpressed without any amplification of the MDR1 gene in multidrug-resistant glioma cell lines as compared to multidrug-sensitive glioma cell lines. It would be reasonable to suggest that amplification of the MDR1 gene may not be a sine qua non for acquisition of MDR and that the MDR1 mRNA level may be well correlated with the extent of MDR.

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Kazuyoshi Kobayashi, Shiro Imagama, Zenya Ito, Kei Ando, Tetsuro Hida, Kenyu Ito, Mikito Tsushima, Yoshimoto Ishikawa, Akiyuki Matsumoto, Yoshihiro Nishida and Naoki Ishiguro

OBJECTIVE

Corrective surgery for spinal deformities can lead to neurological complications. Several reports have described spinal cord monitoring in surgery for spinal deformity, but only a few have included patients younger than 20 years with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). The goal of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of cases with intraoperative transcranial motor evoked potential (Tc-MEP) waveform deterioration during posterior corrective fusion for AIS.

METHODS

A prospective database was reviewed, comprising 68 patients with AIS who were treated with posterior corrective fusion in a prospective database. A total of 864 muscles in the lower extremities were chosen for monitoring, and acceptable baseline responses were obtained from 819 muscles (95%). Intraoperative Tc-MEP waveform deterioration was defined as a decrease in intraoperative amplitude of ≥ 70% of the control waveform. Age, Cobb angle, flexibility, operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), intraoperative body temperature, blood pressure, number of levels fused, and correction rate were examined in patients with and without waveform deterioration.

RESULTS

The patients (3 males and 65 females) had an average age of 14.4 years (range 11–19 years). The mean Cobb angles before and after surgery were 52.9° and 11.9°, respectively, giving a correction rate of 77.4%. Fourteen patients (20%) exhibited an intraoperative waveform change, and these occurred during incision (14%), after screw fixation (7%), during the rotation maneuver (64%), during placement of the second rod after the rotation maneuver (7%), and after intervertebral compression (7%). Most waveform changes recovered after decreased correction or rest. No patient had a motor deficit postoperatively. In multivariate analysis, EBL (OR 1.001, p = 0.085) and number of levels fused (OR 1.535, p = 0.045) were associated with waveform deterioration.

CONCLUSIONS

Waveform deterioration commonly occurred during rotation maneuvers and more frequently in patients with a larger preoperative Cobb angle. The significant relationships of EBL and number of levels fused with waveform deterioration suggest that these surgical invasions may be involved in waveform deterioration.

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Hirokazu Saiwai, Seiji Okada, Mitsumasa Hayashida, Katsumi Harimaya, Yoshihiro Matsumoto, Ken-ichi Kawaguchi, Kazu Kobayakawa, Takeshi Maeda, Hideki Ohta, Kenzo Shirasawa, Kuniyoshi Tsuchiya, Kazumasa Terada, Kouzo Kaji, Takeshi Arizono, Taichi Saito, Masami Fujiwara, Yukihide Iwamoto and Yasuharu Nakashima

OBJECTIVE

Compression of the spinal cord by thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (T-OPLL) often causes severe thoracic myelopathy. Although surgery is the most effective treatment for T-OPLL, problems associated with surgical intervention require resolution because surgical outcomes are not always favorable, and a small number of patients experience deterioration of their neurological status after surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine the surgery-related risk factors contributing to poor clinical outcomes for myelopathy caused by T-OPLL.

METHODS

Data were extracted from the records of 55 patients with thoracic myelopathy due to T-OPLL at institutions in the Fukuoka Spine Group. The mean follow-up period was 5.3 years. Surgical outcomes were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale. To investigate the definitive factors associated with surgical outcomes, univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed with several patient-related and surgery-related factors, including preoperative comorbidities, radiological findings, JOA score, surgical methods, surgical outcomes, and complications.

RESULTS

Neurological status improved in 33 patients (60.0%) and deteriorated in 10 patients (18.2%) after surgery. The use of instrumentation was significantly associated with an improved outcome. In the comparison of surgical approaches, posterior decompression and fusion resulted in a significantly higher neurological recovery rate than did anterior decompression via a posterior approach and fusion or decompression alone. It was also found that postoperative neurological status was significantly poorer when there were fewer instrumented spinal levels than decompression levels. CSF leakage was a predictable risk factor for deterioration following surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

It is important to identify preventable risk factors for poor surgical outcomes for T-OPLL. The findings of the present study suggest that intraoperative CSF leakage and a lower number of instrumented spinal fusion levels than decompression levels were exacerbating factors for the neurological improvement in T-OPLL surgery.