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Jaechan Park, Hyunjin Woo, Dong-Hun Kang, Yong-Sun Kim, Min Young Kim, Im Hee Shin and Sang Gyu Kwak

OBJECT

While the incidence of a recurrent hemorrhage is highest within 24 hours of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and increases with the severity of the clinical grade, a recurrent hemorrhage can occur anytime after the initial SAH in patients with both good and poor clinical grades. Therefore, the authors adopted a 24-hour-a-day, formal protocol, emergency treatment strategy for patients with ruptured aneurysms to secure the aneurysms as early as possible. The incidences of in-hospital rebleeding and clinical outcomes were investigated and compared with those from previous years when broadly defined early treatment was used (< 3 days of SAH).

METHODS

During an 11-year period, a total of 1224 patients with a ruptured aneurysm were managed using a strategy of broadly defined early treatment between 2001 and 2004 (Period B, n = 423), a mixture of early or emergency treatment between 2005 and 2007, and a formal emergency treatment protocol between 2008 and 2011 (Period A, n = 442). Propensity score matching was used to adjust the differences in age, sex, modified Fisher grade, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) clinical grade at admission, size and location of a ruptured aneurysm, treatment modality (clip placement vs coil embolization), and time interval from SAH to admission between the two time periods. The matched cases were allotted to Group A (n = 280) in Period A and Group B (n = 296) in Period B and then compared.

RESULTS

During Period A under the formal emergency treatment protocol strategy, the catheter angiogram, endovascular coiling, and surgical clip placement were started at a median time from admission of 2.0 hours, 2.9 hours, and 3.1 hours, respectively. After propensity score matching, Group A showed a significantly reduced incidence of in-hospital rebleeding (2.1% vs 7.4%, p = 0.003) and a higher proportion of patients with a favorable clinical outcome (modified Rankin Scale score 0–3) at 1 month (87.9% vs 79.7%, respectively; p = 0.008). In particular, the patients with good WFNS grades in Group A experienced significantly less in-hospital rebleeding (1.7% vs 5.7%, respectively; p = 0.018) and better clinical outcomes (1-month mRS score of 0–3: 93.8% vs 87.7%, respectively; p = 0.021) than the patients with good WFNS grades in Group B.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients with ruptured aneurysms may benefit from a strategy of emergency application of surgical clip placement or endovascular coiling due to the reduced incidence of recurrent bleeding and improved clinical outcomes.

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Dong-Hun Kang, Woong Yoon, Seul Kee Kim, Byung Hyun Baek, Yun Young Lee, Yong-Won Kim, Yong-Sun Kim, Yang-Ha Hwang, Joon-Tae Kim and Man Seok Park

OBJECTIVE

The optimal treatment strategy for patients with emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) due to underlying severe intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare treatment outcomes from intracranial angioplasty with or without stenting and intraarterial infusion of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor in patients with ELVO due to severe ICAS, and to investigate predictors of outcome after endovascular therapy in such patients.

METHODS

A total of 140 consecutive patients with ELVO attributable to severe ICAS underwent endovascular therapy at two stroke centers (A and B). Intracranial angioplasty/stenting was primarily performed at center A and intraarterial infusion of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (tirofiban) at center B. Data from both centers were prospectively collected into a database and retrospectively analyzed.

RESULTS

Overall, successful reperfusion was achieved in 95% (133/140) of patients and a good outcome in 60% (84/140). The mortality rate was 7.9%. Symptomatic hemorrhage occurred in 1 patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of successful reperfusion, symptomatic hemorrhage, 3-month modified Rankin scale score 0–2, and mortality between the two centers. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the only independent predictor of good outcome was a history of previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) (odds ratio 0.254, 95% confidence interval 0.094–0.689, p = 0.007).

CONCLUSIONS

Both intracranial angioplasty/stenting and intraarterial infusion of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor are effective and safe in the treatment of underlying severe ICAS in acute stroke patients with ELVO. In addition, a lack of a history of stroke/TIA was the only independent predictor of good outcome after endovascular therapy in such patients.

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Dong-Hun Kang, Woong Yoon, Byung Hyun Baek, Seul Kee Kim, Yun Young Lee, Joon-Tae Kim, Man-Seok Park, Yong-Won Kim, Yong-Sun Kim and Yang-Ha Hwang

OBJECTIVE

The optimal front-line thrombectomy choice for primary recanalization of a target artery remains unknown for patients with acute large-vessel occlusion (LVO) and an underlying intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). The authors aimed to compare procedural characteristics and outcomes between patients who received a stent-retriever thrombectomy (SRT) and patients who received a contact aspiration thrombectomy (CAT), as the front-line approach for treating LVO due to severe underlying ICAS.

METHODS

One hundred thirty patients who presented with acute LVO and underlying severe ICAS at the occlusion site were included. Procedural characteristics and treatment outcomes were compared between patients treated with front-line SRT (n = 70) and those treated with front-line CAT (n = 60). The primary outcomes were the rate of switching to an alternative thrombectomy technique, time from groin puncture to initial reperfusion, and duration of the procedure. Initial reperfusion was defined as revealing the underlying culprit stenosis with an antegrade flow after thrombectomy.

RESULTS

The rate of switching to an alternative thrombectomy after failure of the front-line technique was significantly higher in the CAT group than in the SRT group (40% vs 4.3%; OR 2.543, 95% CI 1.893–3.417, p < 0.001). The median time from puncture to initial reperfusion (17 vs 31 minutes, p < 0.001) and procedure duration (39 vs 75.5 minutes, p < 0.001) were significantly shorter in the SRT group than in the CAT group. In the binary logistic regression analysis, a longer time from puncture to initial reperfusion was an independent predictor of a 90-day poor (modified Rankin Scale score 3–6) functional outcome (per 1-minute increase; OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.008–1.050, p = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS

The authors’ results suggest that SRT may be more effective than CAT for identifying underlying culprit stenosis and therefore considered the optimal front-line thrombectomy technique in acute stroke patients with LVO and severe underlying ICAS.

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Dong-Hun Kang, Byung Moon Kim, Ji Hoe Heo, Hyo Suk Nam, Young Dae Kim, Yang-Ha Hwang, Yong-Won Kim, Yong-Sun Kim, Dong Joon Kim, Hyo Sung Kwak, Hong Gee Roh, Young-Jun Lee and Sang Heum Kim

OBJECTIVE

The role of the balloon guide catheter (BGC) has not been evaluated in contact aspiration thrombectomy (CAT) for acute stroke. Here, the authors aimed to test whether the BGC was associated with recanalization success and good functional outcome in CAT.

METHODS

All patients who had undergone CAT as the first-line treatment for anterior circulation intracranial large vessel occlusion were retrospectively identified from prospectively maintained registries for six stroke centers. The patients were dichotomized into BGC utilization and nonutilization groups. Clinical findings, procedural details, and recanalization success rates were compared between the two groups. Whether the BGC was associated with recanalization success and functional outcome was assessed.

RESULTS

A total of 429 patients (mean age 68.4 ± 11.4 years; M/F ratio 215:214) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A BGC was used in 45.2% of patients. The overall recanalization and good outcome rates were 80.2% and 52.0%, respectively. Compared to the non-BGC group, the BGC group had a significantly reduced number of CAT passes (2.6 ± 1.6 vs 3.4 ± 1.5), shorter puncture-to-recanalization time (56 ± 27 vs 64 ± 35 minutes), lower need for the additional use of thrombolytics (1.0% vs 8.1%), and less embolization to a distal or different site (0.5% vs 3.4%). The BGC group showed significantly higher final (89.2% vs 72.8%) and first-pass (24.2% vs 8.1%) recanalization success rates. After adjustment for potentially associated factors, BGC utilization remained independently associated with recanalization (OR 4.171, 95% CI 1.523–11.420) and good functional outcome (OR 2.103, 95% CI 1.225–3.612).

CONCLUSIONS

BGC utilization significantly increased the final and first-pass recanalization rates and remained independently associated with recanalization success and good functional outcome.

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Yong Hun Pee, Ki Joon Kim, Young-Geun Choi, Sang Hyeop Jeon, Jong Dae Park and Sang-Ho Lee

✓ In this report, the authors present the case of patient with a lymphocele in the retroperitoneal area following anterior lumbar interbody fusion at L4–5. A lymphocele is a rare complication of spinal operations, especially lower lumbar spinal surgeries. The authors discuss this complicating factor and describe its features and treatments.

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Dong-Hun Kang, Duck-Ho Goh, Seung-Kug Baik, Jaechan Park and Yong-Sun Kim

Object

This study aimed to investigate morphological predictors of intraprocedural rupture (IPR) during coil embolization of ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

Methods

A retrospective analysis was conducted in 322 consecutive patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms who were treated with coil embolization over an 8-year period from January 2005 to December 2012. The authors analyzed all available data with emphasis on morphological characteristics of the aneurysm as shown on baseline angiography in relation to IPR. Regarding aneurysm morphology, the authors classified patients according to multilobulation, presence of a daughter sac, and presence of a small basal outpouching (SBO).

Results

The incidence of IPR was 4.8% (16 of 332). In terms of aneurysm configuration, the presence of multilobulation (100.0% [16 of 16] in the IPR group vs 89.2% [282 of 316] in the non-IPR group, p = 0.388) and daughter sac (75.0% [12 of 16] in the IPR group vs 59.2% [187 of 316] in the non-IPR group, p = 0.208) were not significantly associated with IPR. However, SBO, found in 9% (30 of 332) of the study population, was significantly associated with IPR (56.3% [9 of 16] in the IPR group vs 6.7% [21 of 316] in the non-IPR group, OR 18.06, p < 0.0001).

Conclusions

Based on the authors' data, the more general groups of multilobulation and daughter sac were not significantly associated with IPR, although the more specific subgroup with an SBO was. More confirmation studies on these results are required, but they point to the possibility that SBO (with its possible connection to basal rupture) is an important morphological risk factor for IPR during coiling. In addition, future comparison of coiling and clipping treatment for ruptured aneurysms associated with an SBO seems necessary.

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Hun Ho Park, Sang Duk Hong, Yong Hwy Kim, Chang-Ki Hong, Kyung In Woo, In-Sik Yun and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

Trigeminal schwannomas are rare neoplasms with an incidence of less than 1% that require a comprehensive surgical strategy. These tumors can occur anywhere along the path of the trigeminal nerve, capable of extending intradurally into the middle and posterior fossae, and extracranially into the orbital, pterygopalatine, and infratemporal fossa. Recent advancements in endoscopic surgery have suggested a more minimally invasive and direct route for tumors in and around Meckel’s cave, including the endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) and endoscopic transorbital superior eyelid approach (ETOA). The authors assess the feasibility and outcomes of EEA and ETOA for trigeminal schwannomas.

METHODS

A retrospective multicenter analysis was performed on 25 patients who underwent endoscopic surgical treatment for trigeminal schwannomas between September 2011 and February 2019. Thirteen patients (52%) underwent EEA and 12 (48%) had ETOA, one of whom underwent a combined approach with retrosigmoid craniotomy. The extent of resection, clinical outcome, and surgical morbidity were analyzed to evaluate the feasibility and selection of surgical approach between EEA and ETOA based on predominant location of trigeminal schwannomas.

RESULTS

According to predominant tumor location, 9 patients (36%) had middle fossa tumors (Samii type A), 8 patients (32%) had dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the middle and posterior cranial fossae (Samii type C), and another 8 patients (32%) had extracranial tumors (Samii type D). Gross-total resection (GTR, n = 12) and near-total resection (NTR, n = 7) were achieved in 19 patients (76%). The GTR/NTR rates were 81.8% for ETOA and 69.2% for EEA. The GTR/NTR rates of ETOA and EEA according to the classifications were 100% and 50% for tumors confined to the middle cranial fossa, 75% and 33% for dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the middle and posterior cranial fossae, and 50% and 100% for extracranial tumors. There were no postoperative CSF leaks. The most common preoperative symptom was trigeminal sensory dysfunction, which improved in 15 of 21 patients (71.4%). Three patients experienced new postoperative complications such as vasospasm (n = 1), wound infection (n = 1), and medial gaze palsy (n = 1).

CONCLUSIONS

ETOA provides adequate access and resectability for trigeminal schwannomas limited in the middle fossa or dumbbell-shaped tumors located in the middle and posterior fossae, as does EEA for extracranial tumors. Tumors predominantly involving the posterior fossa still remain a challenge in endoscopic surgery.

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Derek Yecies, Rashad Jabarkheel, Michelle Han, Yong-Hun Kim, Lisa Bruckert, Katie Shpanskaya, Augustus Perez, Michael S. B. Edwards, Gerald A. Grant and Kristen W. Yeom

OBJECTIVE

Posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) is a common postoperative complication following resection of posterior fossa tumors in children. It typically presents 1 to 2 days after surgery with mutism, ataxia, emotional lability, and other behavioral symptoms. Recent structural MRI studies have found an association between PFS and hypertrophic olivary degeneration, which is detectable as T2 hyperintensity in the inferior olivary nuclei (IONs) months after surgery. In this study, the authors investigated whether immediate postoperative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the ION can serve as an early imaging marker of PFS.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed pediatric brain tumor patients treated at their institution, Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford, from 2004 to 2016. They compared the immediate postoperative DTI studies obtained in 6 medulloblastoma patients who developed PFS to those of 6 age-matched controls.

RESULTS

Patients with PFS had statistically significant increased mean diffusivity (MD) in the left ION (1085.17 ± 215.51 vs 860.17 ± 102.64, p = 0.044) and variably increased MD in the right ION (923.17 ± 119.2 vs 873.67 ± 60.16, p = 0.385) compared with age-matched controls. Patients with PFS had downward trending fractional anisotropy (FA) in both the left (0.28 ± 0.06 vs 0.23 ± 0.03, p = 0.085) and right (0.29 ± 0.06 vs 0.25 ± 0.02, p = 0.164) IONs compared with age-matched controls, although neither of these values reached statistical significance.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased MD in the ION is associated with development of PFS. ION MD changes may represent an early imaging marker of PFS.