Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Yong Hwy Kim x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Sung Kwon Kim, Dong Gyu Kim, Young-Bem Se, Jin Wook Kim, Yong Hwy Kim, Hyun-Tai Chung and Sun Ha Paek

OBJECTIVE

Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) represents an alternative treatment for patients with tumor-related trigeminal neuralgia (TRTN). However, in previous studies, the primary GKS target was limited to mass lesions. The authors evaluated whether GKS could target both the tumor and the trigeminal root exit zone (REZ) in a single session while providing durable pain relief and minimizing radiation dose–related complications for TRTN patients.

METHODS

The authors' institutional review board approved the retrospective analysis of data from 15 consecutive patients (6 men and 9 women, median age 67 years, range 45–79 years) with TRTN who had undergone GKS. In all cases, the radiation was delivered in a single session targeting both the tumor and trigeminal REZ. The authors assessed the clinical outcomes, including the extent of pain relief, durability of the treatment response, and complications. Radiation doses to organs at risk (OARs), including the brainstem and the cranial nerve VII–VIII complex, were analyzed as doses received by 2% or 50% of the tissue volume and the tissue volume covered by a dose of 12 Gy (V12Gy).

RESULTS

The median length of clinical follow-up was 38 months (range 12–78 months). Pain relief with GKS was initially achieved in 14 patients (93.3%) and at the last follow-up in 13 patients (86.7%). The actuarial recurrence-free survival rates were 93%, 83%, and 69% at 1, 3, and 5 years after GKS, respectively. Persistent facial numbness was observed in 3 patients (20.0%). There were no complications such as facial weakness, altered taste function, hearing impairment, and balance difficulties indicating impaired function of the cranial nerve VII–VIII complex. The V12Gy in the brainstem was less than or equal to 0.24 cm3 in all patients. There were no significant differences in any OAR values in the brainstem between patients with and without facial numbness after GKS.

CONCLUSIONS

The strategy of performing GKS for both tumor and trigeminal REZ in a single session is a safe and effective radiosurgical approach that achieves durable pain control for TRTN patients.

Restricted access

Jung Hee Kim, Yun-Sik Dho, Yong Hwy Kim, Jung Hyun Lee, Ji Hyun Lee, A. Ram Hong and Chan Soo Shin

OBJECTIVE

The natural history and proper algorithm for follow-up testing of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (PAs) are not well known, despite their relatively high prevalence. The aim of this study was to suggest the optimal follow-up algorithm for nonfunctioning PAs based on their natural history.

METHODS

The authors followed up 197 patients with nonfunctioning PAs that had not been treated (including surgery and radiation therapy) at the time of detection, in a single center, between March 2000 and February 2017. They conducted a hormone test, visual field test, and MRI at the time of diagnosis and yearly thereafter.

RESULTS

The overall median follow-up duration was 37 months. Microadenomas (n = 38) did not cause visual disturbance, pituitary apoplexy, or endocrine dysfunction. The incidence of patients with tumor volume growth ≥ 20% was higher for macroadenomas than microadenomas (13.8 vs 5.0 per 100 person-years [PYs], p = 0.002). The median time to any tumor growth was 4.8 years (95% CI 3.4–4.8 years) for microadenomas and 4 years (95% CI 3.3–4.2 years) for macroadenomas. The overall incidence of worsening visual function was 0.69 per 100 PYs. Patients with a tumor volume growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year (n = 20) had a higher incidence of worsening visual function (4.69 vs 0.30 per 100 PYs, p < 0.001). The tumor growth rate of all microadenomas was < 0.88 cm3/year. The median time to tumor growth ≥ 20% was 3.3 years (95% CI 1.8–3.9 years) in patients with a tumor growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year and 4.9 years (95% CI 4.6–7.2 years) in patients with a tumor growth rate < 0.88 cm3/year.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors have devised a follow-up strategy based on the tumor volume growth rate as well as initial tumor volume. In patients with microadenomas, the next MRI study can be performed at 3 years. In patients with macroadenomas, the second MRI study should be performed between 6 months and 1 year to assess the tumor growth rate. In patients with a tumor growth rate ≥ 0.88 cm3/year, the MRI study should be performed within 2 years. In patients with a tumor growth rate < 0.88 cm3/year, the MRI study can be delayed until 4 years.

Full access

Yun-Sik Dho, Yong Hwy Kim, Young-Bem Se, Doo Hee Han, Jung Hee Kim, Chul-Kee Park, Kyu-Chang Wang and Dong Gyu Kim

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) is commonly used for the treatment of craniopharyngioma; therefore, it is essential to analyze outcomes in order to understand the benefits and drawbacks. The goal of this paper was to evaluate the clinical features and outcomes associated with this treatment approach.

METHODS

From July 2010 to March 2016, 82 adult craniopharyngioma patients underwent an EEA at the authors’ institution. Of these cases, intraoperative records and immediate postoperative MR images were available for 68 patients. The patients underwent systemized endocrinological evaluation. Eighteen of 68 patients who underwent EEA for recurrence or regrowth of residual lesions after previous surgical management were excluded in the analysis of the anatomical tumor classification. The authors retrospectively analyzed preoperative clinical features and previous anatomical classifications, focusing on the relationship of the pituitary stalk and tumor, to determine predictive factors for the clinical outcome, such as the extent of resection, visual function, endocrinological function, recurrence rate, and complications.

RESULTS

The mean tumor size was 2.5 cm (3.1 cm for primary tumors and 1.9 cm for recurrent lesions). Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 62 (91.1%) patients (48 [96.0%] patients with primary tumors and 14 [77.8%] patients with recurrent tumors). The rate of GTR was higher in the primary group than in the group with recurrence (p = 0.038). The overall pre- and postoperative visual impairment scale (VIS) scores were 40.8 and 22.1, respectively (50.9 and 14.3 in the primary group and 30.7 and 29.9 in patients with recurrence, respectively). The improvement rate in VIS score was higher in the primary group than in the recurrent group (p = 0.001). Endocrinological function was improved in 4 patients (5.9%) and deteriorated in 32 of 68 patients (47.1%). Tumor invasion into the center of the pituitary stalk affected the postoperative outcomes most significantly. Cognitive dysfunction was observed in 22 patients before surgery and improved in 20 patients (90.9%) after surgery. Hydrocephalus was found in 7 patients and resolved after surgery in all cases. CSF leakage occurred in 2 (2.9%) of 68 patients and was repaired by revision surgery in both patients. Ten patients without CSF leakage also received antibiotics for the treatment of meningitis. The infection rate was higher in the recurrent group. Postoperative endocrinological evaluation showed no deficits in 12 patients and panhypopituitarism in 55 patients. The remaining patient had growth hormone deficiency. Forty-three patients had new-onset diabetes insipidus, and 1 patient had persistent diabetes insipidus after surgery. There were 2 (2.9%) cases of recurrence during the mean 30.7-month follow-up period; one patient underwent radiosurgery and the other underwent reoperation.

CONCLUSIONS

The EEA resulted in excellent surgical outcomes and acceptable morbidity rates, regardless of the anatomical location of the tumor. Invasion of the craniopharyngioma into the center of the pituitary stalk has strong predictive power for postoperative endocrinological outcome.

Restricted access

Yong Hwy Kim, Chiman Jeon, Young-Bem Se, Sang Duk Hong, Ho Jun Seol, Jung-II Lee, Chul-Kee Park, Dong Gyu Kim, Hee-Won Jung, Doo Hee Han, Do-Hyun Nam and Doo-Sik Kong

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach for treating primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus is a formidable task. The authors hypothesized that tumor involvement of nearby critical anatomical structures creates hurdles to endoscopic gross-total resection (GTR). The aim of this study was to retrospectively review the clinical outcomes of patients who underwent an endoscopic endonasal approach to treat primary malignancies involving the clivus and to analyze prognostic factors for GTR.

METHODS

Between January 2009 and November 2015, 42 patients underwent the endoscopic endonasal approach for resection of primary skull base malignancies involving the clivus at 2 independent institutions. Clinical data; tumor locations within the clivus; and anatomical involvement of the cavernous or paraclival internal carotid artery, cisternal trigeminal nerve, hypoglossal canal, and dura mater were investigated to assess the extent of resection. Possible prognostic factors affecting GTR were also analyzed.

RESULTS

Of the 42 patients, 37 were diagnosed with chordomas and 5 were diagnosed with chondrosarcomas. The mean (± SD) preoperative tumor volume was 25.2 ± 30.5 cm3 (range 0.8–166.7 cm3). GTR was achieved in 28 patients (66.7%) and subtotal resection in 14 patients (33.3%). All tumors were classified as upper (n = 17), middle (n = 17), or lower (n = 8) clival tumors based on clival involvement, and as central (24 [57.1%]) or paramedian (18 [42.9%]) based on laterality of the tumor. Univariate analysis identified the tumor laterality (OR 6.25, 95% CI 1.51–25.86; p = 0.011) as significantly predictive of GTR. In addition, the laterality of the tumor was found to be a statistically significant predictor in multivariate analysis (OR 41.16, 95% CI 1.12–1512.65; p = 0.043).

CONCLUSIONS

An endoscopic endonasal approach can provide favorable clinical and surgical outcomes. However, the tumor laterality should be considered as a potential obstacle to total removal.

Full access

Chang Hwan Pang, Soo Eon Lee, Chang Hyeun Kim, Jeong Eun Kim, Hyun-Seung Kang, Chul-Kee Park, Sun Ha Paek, Chi Heon Kim, Tae-Ahn Jahng, Jin Wook Kim, Yong Hwy Kim, Dong Gyu Kim, Chun Kee Chung, Hee-Won Jung and Heon Yoo

OBJECT

There is inconsistency among the perioperative management strategies currently used for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Moreover, postoperative complications such as acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence affect clinical outcome of cSDH surgery. This study evaluated the risk factors associated with acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence and identified an effective perioperative strategy for cSDH patients.

METHODS

A retrospective study of patients who underwent bur hole craniostomy for cSDH between 2008 and 2012 was performed.

RESULTS

A consecutive series of 303 cSDH patients (234 males and 69 females; mean age 67.17 years) was analyzed. Postoperative acute intracranial bleeding developed in 14 patients (4.57%) within a mean of 3.07 days and recurrence was observed in 37 patients (12.21%) within a mean of 31.69 days (range 10–104 days) after initial bur hole craniostomy. The comorbidities of hematological disease and prior shunt surgery were clinical factors associated with acute bleeding. There was a significant risk of recurrence in patients with diabetes mellitus, but recurrence did not affect the final neurological outcome (p = 0.776). Surgical details, including the number of operative bur holes, saline irrigation of the hematoma cavity, use of a drain, and type of postoperative ambulation, were not significantly associated with outcome. However, a large amount of drainage was associated with postoperative acute bleeding.

CONCLUSIONS

Bur hole craniostomy is an effective surgical procedure for initial and recurrent cSDH. Patients with hematological disease or a history of prior shunt surgery are at risk for postoperative acute bleeding; therefore, these patients should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage. Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence.

Restricted access

Doo-Sik Kong, Chang-Ki Hong, Sang Duk Hong, Do-Hyun Nam, Jung-Il Lee, Ho Jun Seol, Jiwoong Oh, Dong Gyu Kim and Yong Hwy Kim

OBJECTIVE

The endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) and the transcranial approach (TCA) are good options for the treatment of tuberculum sellae (TS) meningiomas. The objective of this study was to identify the key anatomical features in TS meningiomas and compare the two surgical approaches.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed clinical data in 178 patients with TS meningiomas treated at 3 institutions between January 2010 and July 2016. Patients with tumors encasing the internal carotid artery or anterior cerebral artery or involving the anterior clinoid process or cavernous sinus were excluded. Tumors were classified as high-lying or low-lying based on their location, and involvement of the optic canal was evaluated. The surgical outcomes of EEA and TCA were analyzed according to the relevant anatomical features.

RESULTS

During the study period, 84 patients underwent EEA and 94 patients underwent TCA. Based on preoperative MR images, 43 (24.2%) meningiomas were classified as high-lying tumors, 126 (70.8%) as low-lying, and 9 (5.0%) as nonspecific. Gross-total resection (GTR) was performed in 145 patients (81.5%); the GTR rate did not differ significantly between the EEA and TCA groups. Of 157 patients with preoperative visual disturbance, 140 had improved or stable vision postoperatively. However, 17 patients (9.6%) experienced some visual deterioration after surgery. The TCA group had a worse visual outcome than the EEA group in patients with preoperative optic canal involvement (77.6% vs 93.2%, p = 0.019), whereas there was no significant difference in visual outcome based on whether tumors were high-lying or low-lying.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study support EEA over TCA, at least with respect to visual improvement with acceptable complications, although TCA is still an effective approach for TS meningioma.