Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for

  • Author or Editor: Yi Lu x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Song-tao Qi, Yi Liu, Jun Pan, Silky Chotai and Lu-xiong Fang

Object

The completeness of meningioma resection depends on the resection of dura mater invaded by the tumor. The pathological changes of the dura around the tumor can be interpreted by evaluating the dural tail sign (DTS) on MRI studies. The goal of this study was to clarify the pathological characteristics of the DTSs, propose a classification based on the histopathological and radiological correlation, and identify the invasive range of tumor cells in different types of DTS.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed 179 patients with convexity meningiomas who underwent Simpson Grade I resection. All patients underwent an enhanced MRI examination preoperatively. The convexity meningiomas were dichotomized into various subtypes in accordance with the 2007 WHO classification of tumors of the CNS, and the DTS was identified based on the Goldsher criteria. The range of resection of the involved dura was 3 cm from the base of the tumor, which corresponded with the length of DTS on MRI studies. Histopathological examination of dura at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 cm from the base of the tumor was conducted, and the findings were correlated with the preoperative MRI appearance of the DTS.

Results

A total of 154 (86%) of 179 convexity meningiomas were classified into WHO Grade I subtype, including transitional (44 [28.6%] of 154), meningothelial (36 [23.4%] of 154), fibrous (23 [14.9%] of 154), psammomatous (22 [14.3%] of 154), secretory (10 [6.5%] of 154), and angiomatous (19 [12.3%] of 154). The other 25 (14%) were non–Grade I (WHO) tumors, including atypical (12 [48%] of 25), anaplastic (5 [20%] of 25), and papillary (8 [32%] of 25). The DTS was classified into 5 types: smooth (16 [8.9%] of 179), nodular (36 [20.1%] of 179), mixed (57 [31.8%] of 179), symmetrical multipolar (15 [8.4%] of 179), and asymmetrical multipolar (55 [30.7%] of 179). There was a significant difference in distribution of DTS type between Grade I and non–Grade I tumors (p = 0.004), whereas the difference was not significant among Grade I tumors (0.841) or among non–Grade I tumors (p = 0.818). All smooth-type DTSs were encountered in Grade I tumors, and the mixed DTS (52 [33.8%] of 154) was the most common type in these tumors. Nodular-type DTS was more commonly seen in non–Grade I tumors (12 [48%] of 25). Tumor invasion was found in 88.3% (158 of 179) of convexity meningiomas, of which the range of invasion in 82.3% (130 of 158) was within 2 cm and that in 94.9% (150 of 158) was within 2.5 cm. The incidence of invasion and the range invaded by tumor cells varied in different types of DTS, and differences were statistically significant (p < 0.001).

Conclusions

Nodular-type DTS on MRI studies might be associated with non–Grade I tumors. The range of dural resection for convexity meningiomas should be 2.5 cm from the tumor base, and if this extent of resection is not feasible, the type of DTS should be considered. However, for skull base meningiomas, in which mostly Simpson Grade II resection is achieved, the use of this classification should be further validated. The classification of DTS enables the surgeon to predict preoperatively and then to achieve the optimal range of dural resection that might significantly reduce the recurrence rate of meningiomas.

Restricted access

Asim Mahmood, Dunyue Lu, Yi Li, Jae Li Chen and Michael Chopp

Object. The authors tested the hypothesis that intracranial bone marrow (BM) transplantation after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats provides therapeutic benefit.

Methods. Sixty-six adult Wistar rats, weighing 275 to 350 g each, were used for the experiment. Bone marrow prelabeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was harvested from tibias and femurs of healthy adult rats. Other animals were subjected to controlled cortical impact, and BM was injected adjacent to the contusion 24 hours after the impact. The animals were killed at 4, 7, 14, or 28 days after transplantation. Motor function was evaluated both before and after the injury by using the rotarod test. After the animals had been killed, brain sections were examined using hemotoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining methods. Histological examination revealed that, after transplantation, BM cells survived, proliferated, and migrated toward the injury site. Some of the BrdU-labeled BM cells were reactive, with astrocytic (glial fibrillary acid protein) and neuronal (NeuN and microtubule-associated protein) markers. Transplanted BM expressed proteins phenotypical of intrinsic brain cells, that is, neurons and astrocytes. A statistically significant improvement in motor function in rats that underwent BM transplantation, compared with control rats, was detected at 14 and 28 days posttransplantation.

Conclusions. On the basis of their findings, the authors assert that BM transplantation improves neurological outcome and that BM cells survive and express nerve cell proteins after TBI.

Restricted access

Dunyue Lu, Asim Mahmood, Ruilan Zhang, Yi Li and Michael Chopp

Object. Neurogenesis, which is upregulated by neural injury in the adult mammalian brain, may be involved in the repair of the injured brain and functional recovery. Therefore, the authors sought to identify agents that can enhance neurogenesis after brain injury, and they report that (Z)-1-[N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (DETA/NONOate), a nitric oxide donor, upregulates neurogenesis and reduces functional deficits after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats.

Methods. The agent DETA/NONOate (0.4 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally into 16 rats daily for 7 days, starting 1 day after TBI induced by controlled cortical impact. Bromodeoxyuridine (100 mg/kg) was also injected intraperitoneally daily for 14 days after TBI to label the newly generated cells in the brain. A neurological functional evaluation was performed in all rats and the animals were killed at 14 or 42 days postinjury. Immunohistochemical staining was used to identify proliferating cells.

Conclusions. Compared with control rats, the proliferation, survival, migration and differentiation of neural progenitor cells were all significantly enhanced in the hippocampus, subventricular zone, striatum, corpus callosum, and the boundary zone of the injured cortex, as well as in the contralateral hemisphere in rats with TBI that received DETA/NONOate treatment. Neurological functional outcomes in the DETA/NONOate-treated group were also significantly improved compared with the untreated group. These data indicate that DETA/NONOate may be useful in the treatment of TBI.

Restricted access

Dunyue Lu, Yi Li, Asim Mahmood, Lei Wang, Tahir Rafiq and Michael Chopp

Object. This study was designed to investigate the effect of treatment with a novel composite material consisting of embryonic neurospheres and bone marrow—derived stromal cell spheres (NMSCSs) in a rat model of traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Methods. The NMSCS composite was injected into the TBI contusion site 24 hours after injury, and all rats were killed on Day 14 after the transplantation. The Rotarod test and the neurological severity score were used to evaluate neurological function. The transplanted NMSCS was analyzed in recipient rat brains by using histological staining and laser scanning confocal microscopy. The lesion volumes in the brains were also calculated using computer image analysis.

Conclusions. Rats that received NMSCS transplants had reduced lesion volume and showed improved motor and neurological function when compared with control groups 14 days after the treatment. These results suggest that transplantation of this novel biological material (NMSCS) may be useful in the treatment of TBI.

Free access

Yakov Gologorsky, John J. Knightly, Yi Lu, John H. Chi and Michael W. Groff

Object

Large administrative databases have assumed a major role in population-based studies examining health care delivery. Lumbar fusion surgeries specifically have been scrutinized for rising rates coupled with ill-defined indications for fusion such as stenosis and spondylosis. Administrative databases classify cases with the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). The ICD-9-CM discharge codes are not designated by surgeons, but rather are assigned by trained hospital medical coders. It is unclear how accurately they capture the surgeon's indication for fusion. The authors first sought to compare the ICD-9-CM code(s) assigned by the medical coder according to the surgeon's indication based on a review of the medical chart, and then to elucidate barriers to data fidelity.

Methods

A retrospective review was undertaken of all lumbar fusions performed in the Department of Neurosurgery at the authors' institution between August 1, 2011, and August 31, 2013. Based on this review, the indication for fusion in each case was categorized as follows: spondylolisthesis, deformity, tumor, infection, nonpathological fracture, pseudarthrosis, adjacent-level degeneration, stenosis, degenerative disc disease, or disc herniation. These surgeon diagnoses were compared with the primary ICD-9-CM codes that were generated by the medical coders and submitted to administrative databases. A follow-up interview with the hospital's coders and coding manager was undertaken to review causes of error and suggestions for future improvement in data fidelity.

Results

There were 178 lumbar fusion operations performed in the course of 170 hospital admissions. There were 44 hospitalizations in which fusion was performed for tumor, infection, or nonpathological fracture. Of these, the primary diagnosis matched the surgical indication for fusion in 98% of cases. The remaining 126 hospitalizations were for degenerative diseases, and of these, the primary ICD-9-CM diagnosis matched the surgeon's diagnosis in only 61 (48%) of 126 cases of degenerative disease. When both the primary and all secondary ICD-9-CM diagnoses were considered, the indication for fusion was identified in 100 (79%) of 126 cases. Still, in 21% of hospitalizations, the coder did not identify the surgical diagnosis, which was in fact present in the chart. There are many different causes of coding inaccuracy and data corruption. They include factors related to the quality of documentation by the physicians, coder training and experience, and ICD code ambiguity.

Conclusions

Researchers, policymakers, payers, and physicians should note these limitations when reviewing studies in which hospital claims data are used. Advanced domain-specific coder training, increased attention to detail and utilization of ICD-9-CM diagnoses by the surgeon, and improved direction from the surgeon to the coder may augment data fidelity and minimize coding errors. By understanding sources of error, users of these large databases can evaluate their limitations and make more useful decisions based on them.

Free access

Aditya V. Karhade, Viren S. Vasudeva, Hormuzdiyar H. Dasenbrock, Yi Lu, William B. Gormley, Michael W. Groff, John H. Chi and Timothy R. Smith

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to use a large national registry to evaluate the 30-day cumulative incidence and predictors of adverse events, readmissions, and reoperations after surgery for primary and secondary spinal tumors.

METHODS

Data from adult patients who underwent surgery for spinal tumors (2011–2014) were extracted from the prospective National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) registry. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors of reoperation, readmission, and major complications (death, neurological, cardiopulmonary, venous thromboembolism [VTE], surgical site infection [SSI], and sepsis). Variables screened included patient age, sex, tumor location, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical classification, preoperative functional status, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, case urgency, and operative time. Additional variables that were evaluated when analyzing readmission included complications during the surgical hospitalization, hospital length of stay (LOS), and discharge disposition.

RESULTS

Among the 2207 patients evaluated, 51.4% had extradural tumors, 36.4% had intradural extramedullary tumors, and 12.3% had intramedullary tumors. By spinal level, 20.7% were cervical lesions, 47.4% were thoracic lesions, 29.1% were lumbar lesions, and 2.8% were sacral lesions. Readmission occurred in 10.2% of patients at a median of 18 days (interquartile range [IQR] 12–23 days); the most common reasons for readmission were SSIs (23.7%), systemic infections (17.8%), VTE (12.7%), and CNS complications (11.9%). Predictors of readmission were comorbidities (dyspnea, hypertension, and anemia), disseminated cancer, preoperative steroid use, and an extended hospitalization. Reoperation occurred in 5.3% of patients at a median of 13 days (IQR 8–20 days) postoperatively and was associated with preoperative steroid use and ASA Class 4–5 designation. Major complications occurred in 14.4% of patients: the most common complications and their median time to occurrence were VTE (4.5%) at 9 days (IQR 4–19 days) postoperatively, SSIs (3.6%) at 18 days (IQR 14–25 days), and sepsis (2.9%) at 13 days (IQR 7–21 days). Predictors of major complications included dependent functional status, emergency case status, male sex, comorbidities (dyspnea, bleeding disorders, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, preoperative leukocytosis), and ASA Class 3–5 designation (p < 0.05). The median hospital LOS was 5 days (IQR 3–9 days), the 30-day mortality rate was 3.3%, and the median time to death was 20 days (IQR 12.5–26 days).

CONCLUSIONS

In this NSQIP analysis, 10.2% of patients undergoing surgery for spinal tumors were readmitted within 30 days, 5.3% underwent a reoperation, and 14.4% experienced a major complication. The most common complications were SSIs, systemic infections, and VTE, which often occurred late (after discharge from the surgical hospitalization). Patients were primarily readmitted for new complications that developed following discharge rather than exacerbation of complications from the surgical hospital stay. The strongest predictors of adverse events were comorbidities, preoperative steroid use, and higher ASA classification. These models can be used by surgeons to risk-stratify patients preoperatively and identify those who may benefit from increased surveillance following hospital discharge.

Full access

Jun Pan, Songtao Qi, Yi Liu, Yuntao Lu, Junxiang Peng, XiAn Zhang, YiKai Xu, Guang-long Huang and Jun Fan

OBJECT

Craniopharyngiomas (CPs) are rare epithelial tumors that are often associated with an enigmatic and unpredictable growth pattern. Understanding the growth patterns of these tumors has a direct impact on surgical planning and may enhance the safety of radical tumor removal. The aim of this study was to analyze the growth patterns and surgical treatment of CPs with a focus on the involvement of the hypothalamopituitary axis and the relationship of the tumor to the arachnoid membrane and surrounding structures.

METHODS

Clinical data from 226 consecutive patients with primary CP were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor location and the relationship of the tumor to the third ventricle floor and the pituitary stalk were evaluated using preoperative MRI and intraoperative findings. A topographic classification scheme was proposed based on the site of tumor origin and tumor development. The clinical relevance of this classification on patient presentation and outcomes was also analyzed.

RESULTS

The growth of CPs can be broadly divided into 3 groups based on the site of tumor origin and on tumor-meningeal relationships: Group I, infrasellar/infradiaphragmatic CPs (Id-CPs), which mainly occurred in children; Group II, suprasellar subarachnoid extraventricular CPs (Sa-CPs), which were mainly observed in adults and rarely occurred in children; and Group III, suprasellar subpial ventricular CPs (Sp-CPs), which commonly occurred in both adults and children. Tumors in each group may develop complex growth patterns during vertical expansion along the pituitary stalk. Tumor growth patterns were closely related to both clinical presentation and outcomes. Patients with Sp-CPs had more prevalent weight gain than patients with Id-CPs or Sa-CPs; the rates of significant weight gain were 41.7% for children and 16.7% for adults with Sp-CPs, 2.2% and 7.1% for those with Id-CPs, and 12.5% and 2.6% for those with Sa-CPs (p < 0.001). Moreover, patients with Sp-CPs had increased hypothalamic dysfunction after radical removal; 39% of patients with Sp-CPs, 14.5% with Id-CPs, and 17.4% with Sa-CPs had high-grade hypothalamic dysfunction in the first 2 postoperative years (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

The classification of CPs based on growth pattern may elucidate the best course of treatment for this formidable tumor. More tailored, individualized surgical strategies based on tumor growth patterns are mandatory to provide long-term tumor control and to minimize damage to hypothalamic structures. Differences in the distribution of growth patterns between children and adults imply that hierarchical comparison is necessary when investigating outcomes and survival across treatment paradigms in patients with CP.

Full access

Chueng-He Lu, Zhi-Fu Wu, Bo-Feng Lin, Meei-Shyuan Lee, Chin Lin, Yuan-Shiou Huang and Yi-Hsuan Huang

OBJECT

Anesthesia techniques can contribute to the reduction of anesthesia-controlled time and may therefore improve operating room efficiency. However, little is known about the difference in anesthesia-controlled time between propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) and desflurane (DES) anesthesia techniques for prolonged lumbar spine surgery under general anesthesia.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis was conducted using hospital databases to compare the anesthesia-controlled time of lengthy (surgical time > 180 minutes) lumbar spine surgery in patients receiving either TIVA via target-controlled infusion (TCI) with propofol/fentanyl or DES/fentanyl-based anesthesia, between January 2009 and December 2011. A variety of time intervals (surgical time, anesthesia time, extubation time, time in the operating room, postanesthesia care unit [PACU] length of stay, and total surgical suite time) comprising perioperative hemodynamic variables were compared between the 2 anesthesia techniques.

RESULTS

Data from 581 patients were included in the analysis; 307 patients received TIVA and 274 received DES anesthesia. The extubation time was faster (12.4 ± 5.3 vs 7.0 ± 4.5 minutes, p < 0.001), and the time in operating room and total surgical suite time was shorter in the TIVA group than in the DES group (326.5 ± 57.2 vs 338.4 ± 69.4 minutes, p = 0.025; and 402.6 ± 60.2 vs 414.4 ± 71.7 minutes, p = 0.033, respectively). However, there was no statistically significant difference in PACU length of stay between the groups. Heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure were more stable during extubation in the TIVA group than in the DES group.

CONCLUSIONS

Utilization of TIVA reduced the mean time to extubation and total surgical suite time by 5.4 minutes and 11.8 minutes, respectively, and produced more stable hemodynamics during extubation compared with the use of DES anesthesia in lengthy lumbar spine surgery.

Restricted access

Bing Zhou, Xiao-Chuan Wang, Jun-Yi Xiang, Ming-Zhao Zhang, Bo Li, Hai-Bo Jiang and Xiao-Dong Lu

OBJECTIVE

Mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent retriever has been widely applied as a safe and effective method in adult acute ischemic stroke (AIS). However, due to the lack of data, the safety and effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent in pediatric AIS has not yet been verified. The purpose of this study was to explore the safety and effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent retriever for pediatric AIS.

METHODS

Between January 2012 and December 2017, 7 cases of pediatric AIS were treated via mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent retriever. The clinical practice, imaging, and follow-up results were reviewed, and the data were summarized and analyzed.

RESULTS

The ages of the 7 patients ranged from 7 to 14 years with an average age of 11.1 years. The preoperative National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores ranged from 9 to 22 with an average of 15.4 points. A Solitaire stent retriever was used in all patients, averaging 1.7 applications of thrombectomy and combined balloon dilation in 2 cases. Grade 3 on the modified Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction scale of recanalization was achieved in 5 cases and grade 2b in 2 cases. Six patients improved and 1 patient died after thrombectomy. The average NIHSS score of the 6 cases was 3.67 at discharge. The average modified Rankin Scale score was 1 at the 3-month follow-up. Subarachnoid hemorrhage after thrombectomy occurred in 1 case and that patient died 3 days postoperatively.

CONCLUSIONS

This study shows that mechanical thrombectomy using a Solitaire stent retriever has a high recanalization rate and excellent clinical prognosis in pediatric AIS. The safety of mechanical thrombectomy in pediatric AIS requires more clinical trials for confirmation.

Full access

Yi Liu, Weina Li, Changhong Tan, Xi Liu, Xin Wang, Yuejiang Gui, Lu Qin, Fen Deng, Changlin Hu and Lifen Chen

Object

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the surgical procedure of choice for patients with advanced Parkinson disease (PD). The globus pallidus internus (GPi) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) are commonly targeted by this procedure. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy of DBS in each region.

Methods

MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane Library were searched for English-language studies published before April 2013. Results of studies investigating the efficacy and clinical outcomes of DBS of the GPi and STN for PD were analyzed.

Results

Six eligible trials containing a total of 563 patients were included in the analysis. Deep brain stimulation of the GPi or STN equally improved motor function, measured by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Section III (UPDRSIII) (motor section, for patients in on- and off-medication phases), within 1 year postsurgery. The change score for the on-medication phase was 0.68 (95% CI – 2.12 to 3.47, p > 0.05; 5 studies, 518 patients) and for the off-medication phase was 1.83 (95% CI – 3.12 to 6.77, p > 0.05; 5 studies, 518 patients). The UPDRS Section II (activities of daily living) scores for patients on medication improved equally in both DBS groups (p = 0.97). STN DBS allowed medication dosages to be reduced more than GPi DBS (95% CI 129.27–316.64, p < 0.00001; 5 studies, 540 patients). Psychiatric symptoms, measured by Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd edition scores, showed greater improvement from baseline after GPi DBS than after STN DBS (standardized mean difference −2.28, 95% CI −3.73 to −0.84, p = 0.002; 3 studies, 382 patients).

Conclusions

GPi and STN DBS improve motor function and activities of daily living for PD patients. Differences in therapeutic efficacy for PD were not observed between the 2 procedures. STN DBS allowed greater reduction in medication for patients, whereas GPi DBS provided greater relief from psychiatric symptoms. An understanding of other symptomatic aspects of targeting each region and long-term observations on therapeutic effects are needed.