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James Feghali, Yuxi Chen, Yangyiran Xie, Christopher Chen and Judy Huang

OBJECTIVE

The effect of depression on outcomes in Chiari malformation type I (CM-1) is unclear. The authors sought to determine whether depression affects outcome in a surgical cohort of CM-1 patients by using a validated outcome assessment tool, the Chicago Chiari Outcome Scale (CCOS).

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database of 149 adult CM-1 patients undergoing suboccipital decompression with duraplasty and cranioplasty. Baseline presentation characteristics and composite as well as subcomponent CCOS scores at last follow-up were compared between depressed and nondepressed patients. Outcome comparisons included both a univariable analysis and a logistic regression model adjusting for several covariates.

RESULTS

The prevalence of depression in the study cohort was 28% (41/149). Baseline demographic and imaging characteristics were similar between the 2 patient groups. Dizziness (p = 0.019) and imbalance (p = 0.015) were significantly more common among depressed patients, but clinical symptoms and severity were otherwise comparable. On univariable analysis, depressed patients were significantly less likely to experience improvement in pain symptoms (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03–0.61, p = 0.003) and functionality (OR 0.17, 95% CI 0.03–0.99, p = 0.049). No significant difference was identified in complications, nonpain symptom improvement, or overall composite CCOS improvement. Similar results were obtained on multivariable analysis controlling for several covariates.

CONCLUSIONS

Depression is independently associated with poor surgical outcome in adult CM-1 patients, namely when evaluating improvement in pain symptoms and functionality. Optimizing the management of depression preoperatively and ensuring follow-up for psychiatric comorbidity in the postoperative period may possibly lead to improved outcomes.

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James Feghali, Yangyiran Xie, Yuxi Chen, Sean Li and Judy Huang

OBJECTIVE

The Chiari Severity Index (CSI) and points-based algorithm of Thakar et al. are two prognostic tools that have been developed to predict the likelihood of improvement after suboccipital decompression in adult patients with Chiari malformation type I (CM-I). This study aimed to externally validate and critically evaluate these algorithms in the interest of guiding the development of improved prediction systems.

METHODS

A consecutive cohort of CM-I patients undergoing suboccipital decompression between September 2006 and September 2018 were included. The CSI and Thakar point score were computed for all patients, and associations with improvement were analyzed. The ability of both prediction systems to predict improvement as measured by different Chicago Chiari Outcome Scale (CCOS) cutoffs was assessed using receiver operating curve analysis. Post hoc correlations between the algorithms and different CCOS subcomponents were also assessed.

RESULTS

The surgical cohort was composed of 149 adult CM-I patients, of whom 39 (26%) had a syrinx. Most patients experienced improvement after surgery (80% CCOS ≥ 13; 96% CCOS ≥ 11). The proportion of patients improving decreased with increasing CSI, but the results were not statistically significant (p = 0.246). No statistically significant difference in the mean Thakar point score was identified between improved and nonimproved patients using both CCOS cutoffs (p = 0.246 for a cutoff of 13 and p = 0.480 for a cutoff of 11). The CSI had a poor ability in identifying improved patients at a CCOS cutoff of 13 (area under the curve [AUC] 0.582) and 11 (AUC 0.646). The Thakar point score similarly had poor discrimination at a cutoff of 13 (AUC 0.467) and 11 (AUC 0.646). Neither algorithm had significant correlation with any of the CCOS subcomponents except for CSI and nonpain symptom improvement (coefficient = −0.273, p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Previously published algorithms failed to provide prediction value with regard to clinically meaningful improvement following suboccipital decompression in adult CM-I patients. Future models and practical scoring systems are still required to improve the decision-making process.