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Qian-Nan Wang, Xiang-Yang Bao, Yong Zhang, Qian Zhang, De-Sheng Li, and Lian Duan

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to investigate long-term outcomes after encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) for the treatment of hemorrhagic moyamoya disease (MMD) and identify the risk factors for recurrent hemorrhages.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed 95 patients with hemorrhagic MMD who were treated with EDAS at 307th Hospital PLA. Clinical features, angiographic findings, and clinical outcomes were investigated. Rebleeding incidences were compared between anterior or posterior hemorrhagic sites. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate rebleeding risks after EDAS.

RESULTS

The average age at symptom onset was 37.1 years (range 20–54 years) for adult patients. The ratio of female to male patients was 1.16:1. In 61 of 95 hemorrhagic hemispheres (64.2%), the anterior choroidal artery (AChA) or posterior communicating artery (PCoA) was extremely dilated, with extensive branches beyond the choroidal fissure, which only occurred in 28 of 86 nonhemorrhagic hemispheres (32.6%). Fifty-seven incidences were classified as anterior hemorrhages and 38 as posterior. Sixteen of 95 patients (16.8%) suffered cerebral rebleeding after a median follow-up duration of 8.5 years. The annual rebleeding rate was 2.2% per person per year. The incidence rate was higher for the posterior group than for the anterior group, but this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Cox regression analysis revealed that the age of symptom onset (OR 1.075, 95% CI 1.008–1.147, p = 0.028) was a predictor of rebleeding strokes.

CONCLUSIONS

Through long-term follow up, EDAS proved beneficial for patients with hemorrhagic MMD. Dilation of the AChA-PCoA is associated with the initial hemorrhage of MMD, and rebleeding is age-related. Patients with hemorrhagic MMD should undergo follow-up over the course of their lives, even when neurological status is excellent.

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Long Wang, Xiang'en Shi, Fangjun Liu, and Hai Qian

Fusiform dilation of the internal carotid artery (FDICA) is an infrequent vascular complication following resection of suprasellar lesions in the pediatric population, and its course appears to be benign without apparent clinical symptoms. However, data correlating symptomatic FDICA with bypass surgery are scarce. The authors here report 2 symptomatic cases that were treated using internal maxillary artery bypass more than 5 years after total removal of a craniopharyngioma at an outside institution. Both cases of FDICA were resected to relieve the mass effect and to expose the craniopharyngioma. The postoperative course was uneventful, and radiological imaging revealed graft conduit patency. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported use of extracranial to intracranial bypass to treat FDICA following removal of a suprasellar lesion. Their findings suggest that bypass surgery is a useful therapeutic approach for symptomatic cases of FDICA and total removal of recurrent craniopharyngioma. Moreover, the indications for surgical intervention and treatment modalities are discussed in the context of previous relevant cases.

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Zhi-Jie Zhou, Feng-Dong Zhao, Xiang-Qian Fang, Xing Zhao, and Shun-Wu Fan

Object

The authors compared the effectiveness of instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (iPLIF) and instrumented posterolateral fusion (iPLF) for the treatment of low-back pain (LBP) due to degenerative lumbar disease.

Methods

Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative observational studies through December 2009 were identified using a retrieval strategy of sensitive and specific searches. The study design, participant characteristics, interventions, follow-up rate and period, and outcomes were abstracted after the assessment of methodological quality of the trials. Analyses were performed following the method guidelines of the Cochrane Back Review Group.

Results

Nine studies were identified—3 RCTs and 6 comparative observational studies. No significant difference was found between the 2 fusion procedures in the global assessment of clinical outcome (OR 1.51, 95% CI 0.71–3.22, p = 0.29) and complication rate (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.16–1.86, p = 0.34). Both techniques were effective in reducing pain and improving functional disability, as well as restoring intervertebral disc height. Instrumented PLIF was more effective in achieving solid fusion (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.35–5.00, p = 0.004), a lower reoperation rate (OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.03–1.29, p = 0.09), and better restoration of segmental angle and lumbar lordotic angle than iPLF. There were no significant differences between the fusion methods regarding blood loss (weighted mean difference –179.63, 95% CI –516.42 to 157.15, p = 0.30), and operating time (weighted mean difference 8.03, 95% CI –45.46 to 61.53, p = 0.77).

Conclusions

The authors' analysis provided moderate-quality evidence that iPLIF has the advantages of higher fusion rate and better restoration of spinal alignment over iPLF. No significant differences were identified between iPLIF and iPLF concerning clinical outcome, complication rate, operating time, and blood loss.

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Long Wang, Shuaibin Lu, Li Cai, Hai Qian, Rokuya Tanikawa, and Xiang’en Shi

OBJECTIVE

The rapid innovation of the endovascular armamentarium results in a decreased number of indications for a classic surgical approach. However, a middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm remains the best example of one for which results have favored microsurgery over endovascular intervention. In this study, the authors aimed to evaluate the experience and efficacy regarding surgical outcomes after applying internal maxillary artery (IMA) bypass for complex MCA aneurysms (CMCAAs).

METHODS

All IMA bypasses performed between January 2010 and July 2018 in a single-center, single-surgeon practice were screened.

RESULTS

In total, 12 patients (9 males, 3 females) with CMCAAs managed by high-flow IMA bypass were identified. The mean size of CMCAAs was 23.7 mm (range 10–37 mm), and the patients had a mean age of 31.7 years (range 14–56 years). The aneurysms were proximally occluded in 8 cases, completely trapped in 3 cases, and completely resected in 1 case. The radial artery was used as the graft vessel in all cases. At discharge, the graft patency rate was 83.3% (n = 10), and all aneurysms were completely eliminated (83.3%, n = 10) or greatly diminished (16.7%, n = 2) from the circulation. Postoperative ischemia was detected in 2 patients as a result of graft occlusion, and 1 patient presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage achieved improved modified Rankin Scale scores compared to the preoperative status but retained some neurological deficits. Therefore, neurological assessment at discharge showed that 9 of the 12 patients experienced unremarkable outcomes. The mean interval time from bypass to angiographic and clinical follow-up was 28.7 months (range 2–74 months) and 53.1 months (range 19–82 months), respectively. Although 2 grafts remained occluded, all aneurysms were isolated from the circulation, and no patient had an unfavorable outcome.

CONCLUSIONS

The satisfactory result in the present study demonstrated that IMA bypass is a promising method for the treatment of CMCAAs and should be maintained in the neurosurgical armamentarium. However, cases with intraoperative radical resection or inappropriate bypass recipient selection such as aneurysmal wall should be meticulously chosen with respect to the subtype of MCA aneurysm.

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Timothy Ryken and Vincent C. Traynelis

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Bing Huang, Ming Yao, QiLiang Chen, Huidan Lin, Xindan Du, Hao Huang, Xian Zhao, Huy Do, and Xiang Qian

OBJECTIVE

Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a debilitating neuromuscular disorder with limited treatment options. The current study describes a novel minimally invasive procedure that provided effective and sustained relief for patients with HFS. The authors provide a detailed description of the awake CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the facial nerve for treatment of HFS, and they examine its clinical efficacy. This is the first time in the literature that this procedure has been applied and systematically analyzed for HFS.

METHODS

Patients with a history of HFS were recruited between August 2018 and April 2020. Those with a history of cerebellopontine lesions, coagulopathy, ongoing pregnancy, cardiac pacemaker or defibrillator implants, or who declined the procedure were excluded from the study. Fifty-three patients who met the study criteria were included and underwent awake CT-guided RFA. Under minimal sedation, a radiofrequency (RF) needle was used to reach the stylomastoid foramen on the affected side under CT guidance, and the facial nerve was localized using a low-frequency stimulation current. Patients were instructed to engage facial muscles as a proxy for motor monitoring during RFA. Ablation stopped when the patients’ hemifacial contracture resolved. Patients were kept for inpatient monitoring for 24 hours postoperatively and were followed up monthly to monitor resolution of HFS and complications for up to 19 months.

RESULTS

The average duration of the procedure was 32–34 minutes. Postoperatively, 91% of the patients (48/53) had complete resolution of HFS, whereas the remaining individuals had partial resolution. A total of 48 patients reported mild to moderate facial paralysis immediately post-RFA, but most resolved within 1 month. No other significant complication was observed during the study period. By the end of the study period, 5 patients had recurrence of mild HFS symptoms, whereas only 2 patients reported dissatisfaction with the treatment results.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors report for the first time that awake CT-guided RFA of the facial nerve at the stylomastoid foramen is a minimally invasive procedure and can be an effective treatment option for HFS.

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Yong Zhang, Xiang-Yang Bao, Lian Duan, Wei-Zhong Yang, De-Sheng Li, Zheng-Shan Zhang, Cong Han, Feng Zhao, Qian Zhang, and Qian-Nan Wang

OBJECTIVE

The object of this study was to summarize the long-term effect of encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS) for the treatment of pediatric moyamoya disease (MMD) and to investigate factors influencing the clinical outcomes of EDAS.

METHODS

Clinical features, angiographic findings, and clinical outcomes were analyzed among MMD patients younger than 18 years who had been treated with EDAS between 2002 and 2007 at the authors’ institution. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate stroke risk after EDAS. Predictors of neurological outcome were assessed.

RESULTS

One hundred fifteen patients were identified. The mean age at symptom onset was 7.3 ± 4.0 years. The incidence of familial MMD was 11.3%. The female/male ratio was 1:1.16. A total of 232 EDAS procedures were performed, and the incidence of postoperative complications was 3%. Postoperative digital subtraction angiography was performed in 54% of the patients, and about 80% of the hemispheres showed good or excellent results. Neovascularization showed significant correlations with delay time (from symptom onset to first operation), Suzuki stage, and preoperative stroke (all p < 0.05). Clinical follow-up was available in 100 patients with a mean follow-up of 124.4 ± 10.5 months. Ten-year cumulative survival was 96.5% after surgery, and the risk of stroke was 0.33%/person-year. An independent life with no significant disability was reported by 92% of the patients. A good outcome correlated with a low Suzuki stage (p = 0.001). Older children and those without preoperative stroke had better clinical outcomes (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

On the basis of long-term follow-up data, the authors concluded that EDAS is a safe and effective treatment for pediatric MMD, can reduce the risk of subsequent neurological events, and can improve quality of life. The risk of ischemia-related complications was higher in younger patients, and older children showed better outcomes. Compensation was greater with more prominent cerebral ischemia. The long-term clinical outcome largely depended on the presence and extent of preoperative stroke.