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Hyun-Seung Kang, Youn-Joo Moon, Young-Yim Kim, Woong-Yang Park, Ae Kyung Park, Kyu-Chang Wang, Jeong Eun Kim, Ji Hoon Phi, Ji Yeoun Lee and Seung-Ki Kim

Object

Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular occlusive disease affecting bilateral internal carotid termini. Smooth-muscle cells are one of the major cell types involved in this disease process. The characteristics of circulating smooth-muscle progenitor cells (SPCs) in MMD are poorly understood. The authors purified SPCs from the peripheral blood of patients with MMD and sought to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in SPCs from these patients.

Methods

The authors cultured and isolated SPCs from the peripheral blood of patients with MMD (n = 25) and healthy control volunteers (n = 22). After confirmation of the cellular phenotype, RNA was extracted from the cells and DEGs were identified using a commercially available gene chip. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to confirm the putative pathogenetic DEGs.

Results

The SPC-type outgrowth cells in patients with MMD invariably showed a hill-and-valley appearance under microscopic examination, and demonstrated high α–smooth muscle actin, myosin heavy chain, and calponin expression (96.5% ± 2.1%, 42.8% ± 18.6%, and 87.1% ± 8.2%, respectively), and minimal CD31 expression (less than 1%) on fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis. The SPCs in the MMD group tended to make more irregularly arranged and thickened tubules on the tube formation assay. In the SPCs from patients with MMD, 286 genes (124 upregulated and 162 downregulated) were differentially expressed; they were related to cell adhesion, cell migration, immune response, and vascular development.

Conclusions

With adequate culture conditions, SPCs could be established from the peripheral blood of patients with MMD. These cells showed specific DEGs compared with healthy control volunteers. This study provides a novel experimental cell model for further research of MMD.

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Dong-Hun Kang, Woong Yoon, Seul Kee Kim, Byung Hyun Baek, Yun Young Lee, Yong-Won Kim, Yong-Sun Kim, Yang-Ha Hwang, Joon-Tae Kim and Man Seok Park

OBJECTIVE

The optimal treatment strategy for patients with emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) due to underlying severe intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS) is unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare treatment outcomes from intracranial angioplasty with or without stenting and intraarterial infusion of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor in patients with ELVO due to severe ICAS, and to investigate predictors of outcome after endovascular therapy in such patients.

METHODS

A total of 140 consecutive patients with ELVO attributable to severe ICAS underwent endovascular therapy at two stroke centers (A and B). Intracranial angioplasty/stenting was primarily performed at center A and intraarterial infusion of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (tirofiban) at center B. Data from both centers were prospectively collected into a database and retrospectively analyzed.

RESULTS

Overall, successful reperfusion was achieved in 95% (133/140) of patients and a good outcome in 60% (84/140). The mortality rate was 7.9%. Symptomatic hemorrhage occurred in 1 patient. There were no significant differences in the rates of successful reperfusion, symptomatic hemorrhage, 3-month modified Rankin scale score 0–2, and mortality between the two centers. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed the only independent predictor of good outcome was a history of previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) (odds ratio 0.254, 95% confidence interval 0.094–0.689, p = 0.007).

CONCLUSIONS

Both intracranial angioplasty/stenting and intraarterial infusion of a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor are effective and safe in the treatment of underlying severe ICAS in acute stroke patients with ELVO. In addition, a lack of a history of stroke/TIA was the only independent predictor of good outcome after endovascular therapy in such patients.

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Dong-Hun Kang, Woong Yoon, Byung Hyun Baek, Seul Kee Kim, Yun Young Lee, Joon-Tae Kim, Man-Seok Park, Yong-Won Kim, Yong-Sun Kim and Yang-Ha Hwang

OBJECTIVE

The optimal front-line thrombectomy choice for primary recanalization of a target artery remains unknown for patients with acute large-vessel occlusion (LVO) and an underlying intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS). The authors aimed to compare procedural characteristics and outcomes between patients who received a stent-retriever thrombectomy (SRT) and patients who received a contact aspiration thrombectomy (CAT), as the front-line approach for treating LVO due to severe underlying ICAS.

METHODS

One hundred thirty patients who presented with acute LVO and underlying severe ICAS at the occlusion site were included. Procedural characteristics and treatment outcomes were compared between patients treated with front-line SRT (n = 70) and those treated with front-line CAT (n = 60). The primary outcomes were the rate of switching to an alternative thrombectomy technique, time from groin puncture to initial reperfusion, and duration of the procedure. Initial reperfusion was defined as revealing the underlying culprit stenosis with an antegrade flow after thrombectomy.

RESULTS

The rate of switching to an alternative thrombectomy after failure of the front-line technique was significantly higher in the CAT group than in the SRT group (40% vs 4.3%; OR 2.543, 95% CI 1.893–3.417, p < 0.001). The median time from puncture to initial reperfusion (17 vs 31 minutes, p < 0.001) and procedure duration (39 vs 75.5 minutes, p < 0.001) were significantly shorter in the SRT group than in the CAT group. In the binary logistic regression analysis, a longer time from puncture to initial reperfusion was an independent predictor of a 90-day poor (modified Rankin Scale score 3–6) functional outcome (per 1-minute increase; OR 1.029, 95% CI 1.008–1.050, p = 0.006).

CONCLUSIONS

The authors’ results suggest that SRT may be more effective than CAT for identifying underlying culprit stenosis and therefore considered the optimal front-line thrombectomy technique in acute stroke patients with LVO and severe underlying ICAS.