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Jaechan Park, Wonsoo Son, Youngseok Kwak and Boram Ohk

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the level of patient satisfaction and approach-related patient complaints between a superciliary keyhole approach and a pterional approach.

METHODS

Patients who underwent an ipsilateral superciliary keyhole approach and a contralateral pterional approach for bilateral intracranial aneurysms during an 11-year period were contacted and asked to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire. The questionnaire covered 5 complaint areas related to the surgical approaches: craniotomy-related pain, sensory symptoms in the head, cosmetic complaints, palpable cranial irregularities, and limited mouth opening. The patients were asked to rate the 5 complaint areas on a scale from 0 (asymptomatic or very pleasant) to 4 (severely symptomatic or very unpleasant). Finally, the patients were asked to rate the level of overall satisfaction related to each surgical procedure on a visual analog scale (VAS) from 0 (most unsatisfactory) to 100 (most satisfactory).

RESULTS

A total of 21 patients completed the patient satisfaction questionnaire during a follow-up clinic visit. For the superciliary procedures, no craniotomy-related pain, palpable irregularities, or limited mouth opening was reported, and only minor sensory symptoms (numbness in the forehead) and cosmetic complaints (short linear operative scar) were reported (score = 1) by 1 (4.8%) and 3 patients (14.3%), respectively. Compared with the pterional approach, the superciliary approach showed better outcomes regarding the incidence of craniotomy-related pain, cosmetic complaints, and palpable irregularities, with a significant between-approach difference (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the VAS score for patient satisfaction was significantly higher for the superciliary approach (mean 95.2 ± 6.0 [SD], range 80–100) than for the pterional approach (mean 71.4 ± 10.6, range 50–90). Moreover, for the pterional approach, a multiple linear regression analysis indicated that the crucial factors decreasing the level of patient satisfaction were cosmetic complaints, craniotomy-related pain, and sensory symptoms, in order of importance (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

In successful cases in which the primary surgical goal of complete aneurysm clipping without postoperative complications is achieved, a superciliary keyhole approach provides a much higher level of patient satisfaction than a pterional approach, despite a facial wound. For a pterional approach, the patient satisfaction level is affected by the cosmetic results, craniotomy-related pain, and numbness behind the hairline, in order of importance.

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Jaechan Park, Wonsoo Son, Ki-Su Park, Dong-Hun Kang and Im Hee Shin

OBJECTIVE

This study was an investigation of surgical cases of a ruptured middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysm that was conducted to identify the risk factors of an intraoperative premature rupture.

METHODS

Among 927 patients with a ruptured intracranial aneurysm who were treated over an 8-year period, the medical records of 182 consecutive patients with a ruptured MCA aneurysm were examined for cases of a premature rupture, and the risk factors were then investigated. The risk factors considered for an intraoperative premature rupture of an MCA aneurysm included the following: patient age; sex; World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies clinical grade; modified Fisher grade; presence of an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH); location of the ICH (frontal or temporal); volume of the ICH; maximum diameter of the ruptured MCA aneurysm; length of the preaneurysmal M1 segment between the carotid bifurcation and the MCA aneurysm; and a sign of sphenoid ridge proximation. The sphenoid ridge proximation sign was defined as a spatial proximation < 4 mm between the sphenoid ridge and the rupture point of the MCA aneurysm, such as a daughter sac, irregularity, or dome of the aneurysm, based on the axial source images of the brain CT angiography sequences.

RESULTS

A total of 11 patients (6.0%) suffered a premature rupture of the MCA aneurysm during surgery. The premature rupture occurrences were classified according to the stage of the surgery, as follows: 1) craniotomy and dural opening (n = 1); 2) aspiration or removal of the ICH (n = 1); 3) retraction of the frontal lobe (n = 1); 4) dissection of the sphenoid segment of the sylvian fissure to access the proximal vessel (n = 4); and 5) perianeurysmal dissection (n = 4). The multivariate analysis with a binary logistic regression revealed that presence of a sphenoid ridge proximation sign (p < 0.001), presence of a frontal ICH associated with the ruptured MCA aneurysm (p = 0.019), and a short preaneurysmal M1 segment (p = 0.043) were all statistically significant risk factors for a premature rupture. Plus, a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that a preaneurysmal M1 segment length ≤ 13.3 mm was the best cutoff value for predicting the occurrence of a premature rupture (area under curve 0.747; sensitivity 63.64%; specificity 81.66%).

CONCLUSIONS

Patients exhibiting a sphenoid ridge proximation sign, the presence of a frontal ICH, and/or a short preaneurysmal M1 segment are at high risk for an intraoperative premature rupture of a MCA aneurysm. Such high-risk MCA aneurysms have a superficial location close to the arachnoid in the sphenoidal compartment of the sylvian fissure and have a rupture point directed anteriorly.

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Jaechan Park, Wonsoo Son, Ki-Su Park, Min Young Kim and Joomi Lee

OBJECT

The Ghajar Guide technique is used to direct a ventricular catheter at a 90° angle to the skull surface at Kocher’s point. However, the human calvaria is not completely spherical. Lateral to the sagittal midline, the calvaria slopes downward with individual variation and thereby affects the accuracy of ventricular catheter placement. Accordingly, the authors investigated the accuracy of the orthogonal catheter trajectory using radiographic simulation and examined the effect of the calvarial slope on this accuracy.

METHODS

A catheter trajectory orthogonal to the skull surface at Kocher’s point and the ideal catheter trajectory to the foramen of Monro were drawn bilaterally on coronal head images of 52 patients with hydrocephalus. The correction angle, the difference between the 2 catheter trajectories, was then measured. Meanwhile, the calvarial slope was measured around Kocher’s point by using a coronal head image. The correlation between the correction angle and factors such as the calvarial slope and bicaudate index was then assessed using a Pearson correlation analysis.

RESULTS

The ventricular catheter trajectory orthogonal to the skull at Kocher’s point in the patients with hydrocephalus led to a catheter trajectory into the ipsilateral (70.2%) or contralateral (29.8%) lateral ventricles. The correction angles ranged from −3.3° to 16.4° (mean ± SD 5.7° ± 3.7°). In 87 (83.7%) head sides, lateral deviation from the orthogonal trajectory was required to approximate the ideal trajectory, and the correction angle ranged from 2.0° to 16.4° (mean 6.7° ± 2.9°). The calvarial slope in the 104 head sides ranged from 15.6° to 32.5° (mean 24.2° ± 3.1°). Pearson correlation analysis revealed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.733) between the calvarial slope and the correction angle.

CONCLUSIONS

The accuracy of ventricular catheter placement using the Ghajar Guide technique is affected primarily by the calvarial slope around Kocher’s point. A radiographic analysis of a preoperative coronal head image can be used to estimate the accuracy of ventricular catheter placement and enable adjustment to approximate the ideal catheter trajectory.

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Youngseok Kwak, Wonsoo Son, Yong-Sun Kim, Jaechan Park and Dong-Hun Kang

OBJECTIVE

The authors evaluated the sensitivity and accuracy of MRA in identifying the shape of small-sized unruptured intracranial aneurysms.

METHODS

Small (< 7 mm) unruptured intracranial aneurysms initially detected by MRA and confirmed by DSA between January 2017 and December 2018 were morphologically reviewed by neuroradiologists. Regularity or irregularity of aneurysm shape was analyzed by two independent reviewers using MRA without DSA results. DSA findings served as the reference standard for aneurysm shape. Irregular shape, which in small aneurysms is associated with a higher likelihood of rupture, was defined as positive, and MRA sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined by using evaluations based on location, size, and MRA magnetic strength (1.5T vs 3T MRA). Multivariate analysis was performed to determine risk factors for false-negative MRA results for irregularly shaped aneurysms.

RESULTS

In total, 652 unruptured intracranial aneurysms in 530 patients were reviewed for this study. For detecting aneurysm shape irregularity, the overall MRA sensitivity was 60.4% for reviewer 1 and 60.9% for reviewer 2. Anterior cerebral artery aneurysms had the lowest sensitivity for location (36.7% for reviewer 1, 46.9% for reviewer 2); aneurysms sized < 3 mm had the lowest sensitivity for size (26.7% for both reviewers); and 1.5T MRA had lower sensitivity and accuracy than 3T MRA. In multivariate analysis, location, size, and magnetic strength of MRA were independent risk factors for false-negative MRA results for irregularly shaped aneurysms.

CONCLUSIONS

MRA had a low sensitivity for detecting the irregular shape of small intracranial aneurysms. In particular, anterior cerebral artery location, aneurysm size < 3 mm, and detection with 1.5T MRA were associated with a higher risk of irregularly shaped aneurysms being misjudged as regular.

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Jaechan Park, Wonsoo Son, Duck-Ho Goh, Dong-Hun Kang, Joomi Lee and Im Hee Shin

OBJECT

The highest incidence of olfactory dysfunction following a pterional approach and its modifications for an intracranial aneurysm has been reported in cases of anterior communicating artery (ACoA) aneurysms. The radiological characteristics of unruptured ACoA aneurysms affecting the extent of retraction of the frontal lobe and olfactory nerve were investigated as risk factors for postoperative olfactory dysfunction.

METHODS

A total of 102 patients who underwent a pterional or superciliary keyhole approach to clip an unruptured ACoA aneurysm from 2006 to 2013 were included in this study. Those patients who complained of permanent olfactory dysfunction after their aneurysm surgery, during a postoperative office visit or a telephone interview, were invited to undergo an olfactory test, the Korean version of the Sniffin’ Sticks test. In addition, the angiographic characteristics of ACoA aneurysms, including the maximum diameter, the projecting direction of the aneurysm, and the height of the neck of the aneurysm, were all recorded based on digital subtraction angiography and sagittal brain images reconstructed using CT angiography. Furthermore, the extent of the brain retraction was estimated based on the height of the ACoA aneurysm neck.

RESULTS

Eleven patients (10.8%) exhibited objective olfactory dysfunction in the Sniffin’ Sticks test, among whom 9 were anosmic and 2 were hyposmic. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that the direction of the ACoA aneurysm, ACoA aneurysm neck height, and estimated extent of brain retraction were statistically significant risk factors for postoperative olfactory dysfunction. Based on a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, an ACoA aneurysm neck height > 9 mm and estimated brain retraction > 12 mm were chosen as the optimal cutoff values for differentiating anosmic/hyposmic from normosmic patients. The values for the area under the ROC curves were 0.939 and 0.961, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

In cases of unruptured ACoA aneurysm surgery, the height of the aneurysm neck and the estimated extent of brain retraction were both found to be powerful predictors of the occurrence of postoperative olfactory dysfunction.

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Jaechan Park, Wonsoo Son, Ki-Su Park, Dong-Hun Kang, Joomi Lee, Chang Wan Oh, O-Ki Kwon, Taesun Kim and Chang-Hyun Kim

OBJECTIVE

For patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs), the information transfer that precedes informed consent needs to be in-depth and detailed, as most patients with a UIA have no symptoms, yet the risks related to treatment are relatively high. Thus, in this study an educational and interactive program was proposed for patients with UIAs to improve the informed consent process and assess the level of comprehension.

METHODS

A total of 110 patients with UIAs underwent the proposed educational and interactive informed consent (EIIC) process and were enrolled in this study. The EIIC process combines patient education using information booklets, a cartoon book, a video, an initial physician-patient interview, answering a questionnaire, a second physician-patient interview based on the questionnaire results, and finally consent. After the first physician-patient interview that provides the patient with specific information, including his or her angiographic characteristics, medical condition, and recommended treatment, the patient is requested to answer a questionnaire composed of 3 parts: demographic information, including the patient's age, sex, and years of education; 13 medical questions to assess the patient's knowledge about his or her UIA; and an evaluation of the usefulness of the educational resources. The control group consisted of 65 patients from 3 other tertiary university hospitals where the EIIC process was not used.

RESULTS

The questionnaire scores of the EIIC group ranged from 7 to 13 (mean ± SD: 11.9 ± 1.3) and were significantly higher than those for the controls (10.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001). The better comprehension of the patients in the EIIC group was remarkable as they were significantly older than those in the control group (62.7 ± 8.3 years vs 55.9 ± 10.5 years, respectively; p < 0.001). For both the EIIC group and the control group, a Pearson correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation (r = 0.232 for the EIIC group, r = 0.603 for controls) between the years of education and the questionnaire score (p = 0.015 for the EIIC group, p < 0.001 for the controls), whereas no correlation was found between the patient age and the questionnaire score. For the EIIC group, the verbal information from the attending physician was selected by 90 patients (81.8%) as the most useful and informative educational method, while the most effective reinforcement of this verbal communication was the video (n = 86; 78.2%), information booklets (n = 16; 14.5%), the Internet (n = 7; 6.4%), and the cartoon book (n = 1; 0.9%).

CONCLUSIONS

The proposed standardized EIIC process resulted in good patient comprehension about UIAs. The verbal information from the attending physician was the most informative, and the video was the most effective reinforcement of the verbal communication. The patient level of comprehension was shown to be correlated with years of education.