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Jennifer Moliterno, William P. Cope, Emma D. Vartanian, Anne S. Reiner, Roselyn Kellen, Shahiba Q. Ogilvie, Jason T. Huse and Philip H. Gutin

OBJECT

While most meningiomas are benign, 1%–3% display anaplastic features, with little current understanding regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying their formation. In a large single-center cohort, the authors tested the hypothesis that two distinct subtypes of anaplastic meningiomas, those that arise de novo and those that progress from lower grade tumors, exist and exhibit different clinical behavior.

METHODS

Pathology reports and clinical data of 37 patients treated between 1999 and 2012 for anaplastic meningioma at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were divided into those whose tumors arose de novo and those whose tumors progressed from previously documented benign or atypical meningiomas.

RESULTS

Overall, the median age at diagnosis was 59 years and 57% of patients were female. Most patients (38%) underwent 2 craniotomies (range 1–5 surgeries) aimed at gross-total resection (GTR; 59%), which afforded better survival when compared with subtotal resection according to Kaplan-Meier estimates (median overall survival [OS] 3.2 vs 1.3 years, respectively; p = 0.04, log-rank test). Twenty-three patients (62%) presented with apparently de novo anaplastic meningiomas. Compared with patients whose tumors had progressed from a lower grade, those patients with de novo tumors were significantly more likely to be female (70% vs 36%, respectively; p = 0.04), experience better survival (median OS 3.0 vs 2.4 years, respectively; p = 0.03, log-rank test), and harbor cerebral hemispheric as opposed to skull base tumors (91% vs 43%, respectively; p = 0.002).

CONCLUSIONS

Based on this single-center experience at MSKCC, anaplastic meningiomas, similar to glial tumors, can arise de novo or progress from lower grade tumors. These tumor groups appear to have distinct clinical behavior. De novo tumors may well be molecularly distinct, which is under further investigation. Aggressive GTR appears to confer an OS advantage in patients with anaplastic meningioma, and this is likely independent of tumor progression status. Similarly, those patients with de novo tumors experience a survival advantage likely independent of extent of resection.

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Ranjodh Singh, William P. Cope, Zhiping Zhou, Michelle E. De Witt, John A. Boockvar and Apostolos J. Tsiouris

OBJECT

Isolated cortical vein thrombosis (ICVT) accounts for less than 1% of all cerebral infarctions. ICVT may cause irreversible parenchymal damage, rendering early and accurate diagnosis critical. This case series and literature review presents the clinical and radiological findings in 7 patients with ICVT, and highlights risk factors and imaging modalities that may be most beneficial in rendering an accurate and timely diagnosis.

METHODS

Patients with CT and MRI findings consistent with ICVT examined between January 2011 and June 2014 were included in this retrospective review.

RESULTS

Seven patients (5 females, 2 males), ranging in age from 11 months to 34 years, met the inclusion criteria. The most common clinical presentations were headaches (n = 4) and seizures (n = 3). The most common comorbidities noted in these patients were hypercoagulable states (n = 4) and intracranial hypotension (n = 3). Five patients had intraparenchymal involvement. CT suggested the correct diagnosis in 4 patients, and MRI confirmed the diagnosis in all 7 patients. All patients who received anticoagulation therapy (n = 5) experienced complete resolution of their symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS

The majority of these patients were adult females, consistent with published data. Seizures and headaches were the most common presenting symptoms. Hypercoagulable state and intracranial hypotension, both known risk factors for thrombosis, were the most commonly noted ICVT risk factors. Intraparenchymal involvement was prevalent in nearly all ICVT cases and presented as vasogenic edema, early intraparenchymal hemorrhage, or hemorrhagic venous infarction. Susceptibility-weighted imaging was the most sensitive imaging technique in diagnosing ICVT.

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Brad E. Zacharia, Sweena Kahn, Evan D. Bander, Gustav Y. Cederquist, William P. Cope, Lily McLaughlin, Alexa Hijazi, Anne S. Reiner, Ilya Laufer and Mark Bilsky

OBJECTIVE

The authors of this study aimed to identify the incidence of and risk factors for preoperative deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients undergoing surgical treatment for spinal metastases.

METHODS

Univariate analysis of patient age, sex, ethnicity, laboratory values, comorbidities, preoperative ambulatory status, histopathological classification, spinal level, and surgical details was performed. Factors significantly associated with DVT univariately were entered into a multivariate logistic regression model.

RESULTS

The authors identified 314 patients, of whom 232 (73.9%) were screened preoperatively for a DVT. Of those screened, 22 (9.48%) were diagnosed with a DVT. The screened patients were older (median 62 vs 55 years, p = 0.0008), but otherwise similar in baseline characteristics. Nonambulatory status, previous history of DVT, lower partial thromboplastin time, and lower hemoglobin level were statistically significant and independent factors associated with positive results of screening for a DVT. Results of screening were positive in only 6.4% of ambulatory patients in contrast to 24.4% of nonambulatory patients, yielding an odds ratio of 4.73 (95% CI 1.88–11.90). All of the patients who had positive screening results underwent preoperative placement of an inferior vena cava filter.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients requiring surgery for spinal metastases represent a population with unique risks for venous thromboembolism. This study showed a 9.48% incidence of DVT in patients screened preoperatively. The highest rates of preoperative DVT were identified in nonambulatory patients, who were found to have a 4-fold increase in the likelihood of harboring a DVT. Understanding the preoperative thrombotic status may provide an opportunity for early intervention and risk stratification in this critically ill population.