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Per Kristian Eide and Wilhelm Sorteberg

Object

In this study, the authors compare simultaneous measurements of static and pulsatile pressure parameters in the epidural space and brain parenchyma of hydrocephalic patients.

Methods

Simultaneous intracranial pressure (ICP) signals from the epidural space (ICPEPI) and the brain parenchyma (ICPPAR) were compared in 12 patients undergoing continuous ICP monitoring as part of their diagnostic workup for hydrocephalus. The static ICP was characterized by mean ICP and the frequency of B waves quantified in the time domain, while the pulsatile ICP was determined from the cardiac beat–induced single ICP waves and expressed by the ICP pulse pressure amplitude (dP) and latency (dT; that is, rise time).

Results

The 12 patients underwent a median of 22.5 hours (range 5.9–24.8 hours) of ICP monitoring. Considering the total recording period of each patient, the mean ICP (static ICP) differed between the 2 compartments by ≥ 5 mm Hg in 8 patients (67%) and by ≥ 10 mm Hg in 4 patients (33%). In contrast, for every patient the ICP pulse pressure readings from the 2 compartments showed near-identical results. Consequently, when sorting patients to shunt/no shunt treatment according to pulsatile ICP values, selection was independent of sensor placement. The frequency of B waves also compared well between the 2 compartments.

Conclusions

The pulsatile ICP is measured with equal confidence from the ICPEPI and ICPPAR signals. When using the pulsatile ICP for evaluation of hydrocephalic patients, valid measurements may thus be obtained from pressure monitoring in the epidural space. Recorded differences in the mean ICP between the epidural space and the brain parenchyma are best explained by differences in the zero setting of different sensors.

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Torstein R. Meling, Angelika Sorteberg, Søren J. Bakke, Haldor Slettebø, Juha Hernesniemi and Wilhelm Sorteberg

Object

The object of this study was to evaluate cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured blood blister–like aneurysms (BBAs) of the internal carotid artery (ICA) trunk.

Methods

The authors performed a single-center, retrospective study. Data analyzed were patient age, sex, Hunt and Hess grade, Fisher grade, time from SAH to hospitalization, aneurysm size and location, collateral capacity of the circle of Willis, time from hospitalization to aneurysm repair, type of aneurysm repair, complications, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at follow-up.

Results

A total of 211 patients suffered SAH from ICA aneurysms. Of these, 14 patients (6.6%) had ICA trunk BBAs; 6 men and 8 women. The median age was 47.8 years (range 29.9–67.7 years). The Hunt and Hess grade was IV or V in 7 cases, and SAH was Fisher Grade 3 + 4 in 6. All aneurysms were small (< 1 cm), without relation to vessel bifurcations, and usually located anteromedially on the ICA trunk. Three patients were treated with coil placement and 11 with clip placement. Of the 7 patients in whom the ICA was preserved, only 1 had poor outcome (GOS Score 2). In contrast, cerebral infarcts developed in all patients treated with ICA sacrifice, directly postoperatively in 2 and after delay in 5. Six patients died, 1 survived in poor condition (GOS Score 3; p < 0.001).

Conclusions

Internal carotid BBAs are rare, small, and difficult to treat endovascularly, with only 2 of 14 patients successfully treated with coil placement. The BBAs rupture easily during surgery (ruptured in 6 of 11 surgical cases). Intraoperative aneurysm rupture invariably led to ICA trap ligation. Sacrifice of the ICA within 48 hours of an SAH led to very poor outcome, even in patients with adequate collateral capacity on preoperative angiograms, probably because of vasospasm-induced compromise of the cerebral collaterals.

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Per Kristian Eide, Angelika Sorteberg, Gunnar Bentsen, Pål Bache Marthinsen, Audun Stubhaug and Wilhelm Sorteberg

Object

Indices of cerebrovascular pressure reactivity (CPR) represent surrogate markers of cerebral autoregulation. Given that intracranial pressure (ICP) wave amplitude–guided management, as compared with static ICP-guided management, improves outcome following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), indices of CPR derived from pressure wave amplitudes should be further explored. This study was undertaken to investigate the value of CPR indices derived from static ICP–arterial blood pressure (ABP) values (pressure reactivity index [PRx]) versus ICP-ABP wave amplitudes (ICP-ABP wave amplitude correlation [IAAC]) in relation to the early clinical state and 12-month outcome in patients with aneurysmal SAH.

Methods

The authors conducted a single-center clinical trial enrolling patients with aneurysmal SAH. The CPR indices of PRx and IAAC of Week 1 after hemorrhage were related to the early clinical state (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score) and 12-month outcome (modified Rankin Scale score).

Results

Ninety-four patients were included in the study. The IAAC, but not the PRx, increased with decreasing GCS score; that is, the higher the IAAC, the worse the clinical state. The PRx could differentiate between survivors and nonsurvivors only, whereas the IAAC clearly distinguished the groups “independent,” “dependent,” and “dead.” In patients with an average IAAC ≥ 0.2, mortality was approximately 3-fold higher than in those with an IAAC < 0.2.

Conclusions

The IAAC, which is based on single ICP-ABP wave identification, relates significantly to the early clinical state and 12-month outcome following aneurysmal SAH. Impaired cerebrovascular pressure regulation during the 1st week after a bleed relates to a worse outcome. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00248690.

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Tanja Karic, Cecilie Røe, Tonje Haug Nordenmark, Frank Becker, Wilhelm Sorteberg and Angelika Sorteberg

OBJECTIVE

Early rehabilitation is effective in an array of acute neurological disorders but it is not established as part of treatment guidelines after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This may in part be due to the fear of aggravating the development of cerebral vasospasm, which is the most feared complication of aSAH. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of early rehabilitation and mobilization on complications during the acute phase and within 90 days after aSAH.

METHODS

This was a prospective, interventional study that included patients with aSAH at the neuro-intermediate ward after aneurysm repair. The control group received standard treatment, whereas the early rehab group underwent early rehabilitation and mobilization in addition to standard treatment. Clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with aSAH, progression in mobilization, and treatment variables were registered. The frequency and severity of cerebral vasospasm, cerebral infarction acquired in conjunction with the aSAH, and acute and chronic hydrocephalus, as well as pulmonary and thromboembolic complications, were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS

Clinical and radiological characteristics of patients with aSAH were similar between the groups. The early rehab group was mobilized beginning on the first day after aneurysm repair. The significantly quicker and higher degree of mobilization in the early rehab group did not increase complications. Clinical cerebral vasospasm was not as frequent in the early rehab group and it also tended to be less severe. Each step of mobilization achieved during the first 4 days after aneurysm repair reduced the risk of severe vasospasm by 30%. Acute and chronic hydrocephalus were similar in both groups, but there was a tendency toward earlier shunt implantation among patients in the control group. Pulmonary infections, thromboembolic events, and death before discharge or within 90 days after the ictus were similar between the 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Early rehabilitation of patients after aSAH is safe and feasible. The earlier and higher degree of mobilization does not increase neurosurgical complications. Rather, the frequency and severity of cerebral vasospasm following aSAH are alleviated and are not aggravated by early rehabilitation.

Clinical trial registration no.: NCT01656317 (www.clinicaltrials.gov).