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  • Author or Editor: Wendy J. Sherman x
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Andres Ramos-Fresnedo, Ricardo A. Domingo, Jesus E. Sanchez-Garavito, Carlos Perez-Vega, Oluwaseun O. Akinduro, Mark E. Jentoft, Sujay A. Vora, Paul D. Brown, Alyx B. Porter, Bernard R. Bendok, Michael J. Link, Erik H. Middlebrooks, Daniel M. Trifiletti, Kaisorn L. Chaichana, Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, and Wendy J. Sherman

OBJECTIVE

Multiple meningiomas (MMs) occur in as many as 18% of patients with meningioma, and data on progression-free survival (PFS) are scarce. The objective of this study was to explore the influence of the number of lesions and clinical characteristics on PFS in patients with WHO grade I meningiomas.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of all adults diagnosed with a meningioma at their three main sites from January 2009 to May 2020. Progression was considered the time from diagnosis until radiographic growth of the originally resected meningioma. A secondary analysis was performed to evaluate the time of diagnosis until the time to second intervention (TTSI). Univariable and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess whether the number of lesions or any associated variables (age, sex, race, radiation treatment, tumor location, and extent of resection) had a significant impact on PFS and TTSI.

RESULTS

Eight hundred thirty-eight patients were included. Use of a log-rank test to evaluate PFS and TTSI between a single and multiple lesions showed a significantly shorter progression for MM (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed significantly inferior PFS on MM compared to a single lesion (hazard ratio [HR] 2.262, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.392–3.677, p = 0.001) and a significantly inferior TTSI for patients with MM when compared to patients with a single meningioma (HR 2.377, 95% CI 1.617–3.494, p = 0.001). By testing the number of meningiomas as a continuous variable, PFS was significantly inferior for each additional meningioma (HR 1.350, 95% CI 1.074–1.698, p = 0.010) and TTSI was significantly inferior as well (HR 1.428, 95% CI 1.189–1.716, p < 0.001). African American patients had an inferior PFS when compared to non-Hispanic White patients (HR 3.472, 95% CI 1.083–11.129, p = 0.036).

CONCLUSIONS

The PFS of meningiomas appears to be influenced by the number of lesions present. Patients with MM also appear to be more prone to undergoing a second intervention for progressive disease. Hence, a closer follow-up may be warranted in patients who present with multiple lesions. These results show a decreased PFS for each additional lesion present, as well as a shorter PFS for MM compared to a single lesion. When assessing associated risk factors, African American patients showed an inferior PFS, whereas older age and adjuvant therapy with radiation showed an improved PFS.

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Oluwaseun O. Akinduro, Diogo P. Garcia, Dominique M. O. Higgins, Tito Vivas-Buitrago, Mark Jentoft, David A. Solomon, David J. Daniels, Zach Pennington, Wendy J. Sherman, Mychael Delgardo, Mohamad Bydon, Maziyar A. Kalani, George Zanazzi, Nadejda Tsankova, Bernard R. Bendok, Paul C. McCormick, Daniel M. Sciubba, Sheng-fu Larry Lo, Jennifer L. Clarke, Kingsley Abode-Iyamah, and Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa

OBJECTIVE

High-grade spinal glioma (HGSG) is a rare but aggressive tumor that occurs in both adults and children. Histone H3 K27M mutation correlates with poor prognosis in children with diffuse midline glioma. However, the role of H3 K27M mutation in the prognosis of adults with HGSG remains unclear owing to the rarity of this mutation, conflicting reports, and the absence of multicenter studies on this topic.

METHODS

The authors studied a cohort of 30 adult patients with diffuse HGSG who underwent histological confirmation of diagnosis, surgical intervention, and treatment between January 2000 and July 2020 at six tertiary academic centers. The primary outcome was the effect of H3 K27M mutation status on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

RESULTS

Thirty patients (18 males and 12 females) with a median (range) age of 50.5 (19–76) years were included in the analysis. Eighteen patients had H3 K27M mutation–positive tumors, and 12 had H3 K27M mutation–negative tumors. The median (interquartile range) PFS was 3 (10) months, and the median (interquartile range) OS was 9 (23) months. The factors associated with increased survival were treatment with concurrent chemotherapy/radiation (p = 0.006 for PFS, and p ≤ 0.001 for OS) and American Spinal Injury Association grade C or better at presentation (p = 0.043 for PFS, and p < 0.001 for OS). There were no significant differences in outcomes based on tumor location, extent of resection, sex, or H3 K27M mutation status. Analysis restricted to HGSG containing necrosis and/or microvascular proliferation (WHO grade IV histological features) revealed increased OS for patients with H3 K27M mutation–positive tumors (p = 0.017).

CONCLUSIONS

Although H3 K27M mutant–positive HGSG was associated with poor outcomes in adult patients, the outcomes of patients with H3 K27M mutant–positive HGSG were somewhat more favorable compared with those of their H3 K27M mutant–negative HGSG counterparts. Further preclinical animal studies and larger clinical studies are needed to further understand the age-dependent effects of H3 K27M mutation.

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Oluwaseun O. Akinduro, Diogo P. Garcia, Dominique M. O. Higgins, Tito Vivas-Buitrago, Mark Jentoft, David A. Solomon, David J. Daniels, Zach Pennington, Wendy J. Sherman, Mychael Delgardo, Mohamad Bydon, Maziyar A. Kalani, George Zanazzi, Nadejda Tsankova, Bernard R. Bendok, Paul C. McCormick, Daniel M. Sciubba, Sheng-fu Larry Lo, Jennifer L. Clarke, Kingsley Abode-Iyamah, and Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa

OBJECTIVE

High-grade spinal glioma (HGSG) is a rare but aggressive tumor that occurs in both adults and children. Histone H3 K27M mutation correlates with poor prognosis in children with diffuse midline glioma. However, the role of H3 K27M mutation in the prognosis of adults with HGSG remains unclear owing to the rarity of this mutation, conflicting reports, and the absence of multicenter studies on this topic.

METHODS

The authors studied a cohort of 30 adult patients with diffuse HGSG who underwent histological confirmation of diagnosis, surgical intervention, and treatment between January 2000 and July 2020 at six tertiary academic centers. The primary outcome was the effect of H3 K27M mutation status on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS).

RESULTS

Thirty patients (18 males and 12 females) with a median (range) age of 50.5 (19–76) years were included in the analysis. Eighteen patients had H3 K27M mutation–positive tumors, and 12 had H3 K27M mutation–negative tumors. The median (interquartile range) PFS was 3 (10) months, and the median (interquartile range) OS was 9 (23) months. The factors associated with increased survival were treatment with concurrent chemotherapy/radiation (p = 0.006 for PFS, and p ≤ 0.001 for OS) and American Spinal Injury Association grade C or better at presentation (p = 0.043 for PFS, and p < 0.001 for OS). There were no significant differences in outcomes based on tumor location, extent of resection, sex, or H3 K27M mutation status. Analysis restricted to HGSG containing necrosis and/or microvascular proliferation (WHO grade IV histological features) revealed increased OS for patients with H3 K27M mutation–positive tumors (p = 0.017).

CONCLUSIONS

Although H3 K27M mutant–positive HGSG was associated with poor outcomes in adult patients, the outcomes of patients with H3 K27M mutant–positive HGSG were somewhat more favorable compared with those of their H3 K27M mutant–negative HGSG counterparts. Further preclinical animal studies and larger clinical studies are needed to further understand the age-dependent effects of H3 K27M mutation.