Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 47 items for

  • Author or Editor: Warren R. Selman x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Cerebral blood flow

Warren R. Selman and H. Richard Winn

Restricted access

Editorial

Stereotactic radiosurgery for arteriovenous malformations

Nicholas C. Bambakidis and Warren R. Selman

Restricted access

Risks of Barbiturate Therapy

Restricted access

Nimodipine in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Full access

Pituitary tumor apoplexy: characteristics, treatment, and outcomes

Meg Verrees, Baha M. Arafah, and Warren R. Selman

Pituitary tumor apoplexy is an uncommon event heralded by abrupt onset of severe headache, restriction of visual fields, deterioration of visual acuity, and weakness of ocular motility frequently coupled with clinical indications of decreased endocrine function. Hemorrhage into or necrosis of a preexisting sellar mass, usually a pituitary macroadenoma, produces an expansion of sellar contents. Compression of adjacent structures elicits the variable expression of symptoms referable to displacement of the optic nerves and chiasm and impingement of the third, fourth, and sixth cranial nerves. Damage to or destruction of the anterior pituitary leads to multiple acute and/or chronic hormone deficiencies in many patients. Medical management may be used in rare cases in which the signs and symptoms are mild and restricted to meningismus or ophthalmoplegia deemed to be stable. In patients with visual or oculomotor lability or an altered level of consciousness, expeditious surgical decompression, accomplished most commonly through a transsphenoidal approach, should be performed to save life and vision and to optimize the chance of regaining or maintaining pituitary function.

Free access

Introduction: Cushing's disease: a century of evolving diagnostics and therapeutics for an often elusive entity

Gabriel Zada, John D. Carmichael, and Warren R. Selman

Free access

Editorial: Management of Cushing's disease in the US

James Wright, Christina Huang Wright, and Warren R. Selman

Free access

Editorial: Making the diagnosis of cyclic Cushing's syndrome: a position statement from the topic editors

John D. Carmichael, Gabriel Zada, and Warren R. Selman

Restricted access

Editorial

Hypertonic saline

Alan Hoffer and Warren R. Selman

Full access

Molecular genetics of familial cerebral cavernous malformations

Shervin R. Dashti, Alan Hoffer, Yin C. Hu, and Warren R. Selman

✓Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are angiographically occult neurovascular lesions that consist of enlarged vascular channels without intervening normal parenchyma. Cavernous malformations can occur as sporadic or auto-somal-dominant inherited conditions. Approximately 50% of Hispanic patients with cerebral CMs have the familial form, compared with 10 to 20% of Caucasian patients. There is no difference in the pathological findings or presentation in the sporadic and familial forms. To date, familial CMs have been attributed to mutations at three different loci: CCM1 on 7q21.2, CCM2 on 7p15-p13, or CCM3 on 3q25.2-q27. The authors summarize the current understanding of the molecular events underlying familial CMs.