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Wen-Yuh Chung, David Hung-Chi Pan, Cheng-Ying Shiau, Wan-Yuo Guo and Ling-Wei Wang

Object. The goal of this study was to elucidate the role of gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) and adjuvant stereotactic procedures by assessing the outcome of 31 consecutive patients harboring craniopharyngiomas treated between March 1993 and December 1999.

Methods. There were 31 consecutive patients with craniopharyngiomas: 18 were men and 13 were women. The mean age was 32 years (range 3–69 years). The mean tumor volume was 9 cm3 (range 0.3–28 cm3). The prescription dose to the tumor margin varied from 9.5 to 16 Gy. The visual pathways received 8 Gy or less. Three patients underwent stereotactic aspiration to decompress the cystic component before GKS. The tumor response was classified by percentage reduction of tumor volume as calculated based on magnetic resonance imaging studies. Clinical outcome was evaluated according to improvement and dependence on replacement therapy.

An initial postoperative volume increase with enlargement of a cystic component was found in three patients. They were treated by adjuvant stereotactic aspiration and/or Ommaya reservoir implantation. Tumor control was achieved in 87% of patients and 84% had fair to excellent clinical outcome in an average follow-up period of 36 months. Treatment failure due to uncontrolled tumor progression was seen in four patients at 26, 33, 49, and 55 months, respectively, after GKS. Only one patient was found to have a mildly restricted visual field; no additional endocrinological impairment or neurological deterioration could be attributed to the treatment. There was no treatment-related mortality.

Conclusions. Multimodality management of patients with craniopharyngiomas seemed to provide a better quality of patient survival and greater long-term tumor control. It is suggested that GKS accompanied by adjuvant stereotactic procedures should be used as an alternative in treating recurrent or residual craniopharyngiomas if further microsurgical excision cannot promise a cure.

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D. Hung-Chi Pan, Wan-Yuo Guo, Wen-Yuh Chung, Cheng-Ying Shiau, Yue-Cune Chang and Ling-Wei Wang

Object. A consecutive series of 240 patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated by gamma knife radiosurgery (GKS) between March 1993 and March 1999 was evaluated to assess the efficacy and safety of radiosurgery for cerebral AVMs larger than 10 cm3 in volume.

Methods. Seventy-six patients (32%) had AVM nidus volumes of more than 10 cm3. During radiosurgery, targeting and delineation of AVM nidi were based on integrated stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and x-ray angiography. The radiation treatment was performed using multiple small isocenters to improve conformity of the treatment volume. The mean dose inside the nidus was kept between 20 Gy and 24 Gy. The margin dose ranged between 15 to 18 Gy placed at the 55 to 60% isodose centers. Follow up ranged from 12 to 73 months.

There was complete obliteration in 24 patients with an AVM volume of more than 10 cm3 and in 91 patients with an AVM volume of less than 10 cm3. The latency for complete obliteration in larger-volume AVMs was significantly longer. In Kaplan—Meier analysis, the complete obliteration rate in 40 months was 77% in AVMs with volumes between 10 to 15 cm3, as compared with 25% for AVMs with a volume of more than 15 cm3. In the latter, the obliteration rate had increased to 58% at 50 months. The follow-up MR images revealed that large-volume AVMs had higher incidences of postradiosurgical edema, petechiae, and hemorrhage. The bleeding rate before cure was 9.2% (seven of 76) for AVMs with a volume exceeding 10 cm3, and 1.8% (three of 164) for AVMs with a volume less than 10 cm3. Although focal edema was more frequently found in large AVMs, most of the cases were reversible. Permanent neurological complications were found in 3.9% (three of 76) of the patients with an AVM volume of more than 10 cm3, 3.8% (three of 80) of those with AVM volume of 3 to 10 cm3, and 2.4% (two of 84) of those with an AVM volume less than 3 cm3. These differences in complications rate were not significant.

Conclusions. Recent improvement of radiosurgery in conjunction with stereotactic MR targeting and multiplanar dose planning has permitted the treatment of larger AVMs. It is suggested that gamma knife radiosurgery is effective for treating AVMs as large as 30 cm3 in volume with an acceptable risk.

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Lars Kihlström, Wan-Yuo Guo, Bengt Karlsson, Christer Lindquist and Melker Lindqvist

✓ The authors report outcomes in 18 patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) who were treated with gamma knife radiosurgery and in whom magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was obtained a mean of 14 years (range 8–23 years) after treatment and 10 years (range 4–17 years) after confirmed obliteration of the AVM. All patients were asymptomatic after radiosurgery and during the time of the study. In five patients (28%), cyst formation was observed that corresponded to the site of the obliterated AVM. Cyst formation and contrast enhancement on MR imaging could not be statistically correlated to the radiation dose. In 11 (61%) of the 18 patients, contrast enhancement that was not related to a recanalization of the nidus was observed in the target area. In three patients (17%), an increased T2-weighted signal was detected at the site of previous AVM; this was interpreted as gliosis or demyelination, which appeared to be dose dependent. The study illustrates that cyst formation, contrast enhancement, and an increased T2-weighted signal can be observed in asymptomatic patients in the area that was targeted for AVM radiosurgery up to 23 years after the procedure. The report provides new and essential information about long-term effects on normal tissue after radiosurgery and provides a basis for the interpretation of MR studies in the follow up of small AVMs treated by radiosurgery.

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David Hung-chi Pan, Wen-yuh Chung, Wan-yuo Guo, Hsiu-mei Wu, Kang-du Liu, Cheng-ying Shiau and Ling-wei Wang

Object. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of radiosurgery for the treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) located in the region of the transverse—sigmoid sinus.

Methods. A series of 20 patients with DAVFs located in the transverse—sigmoid sinus, who were treated with gamma knife surgery between June 1995 and June 2000, was evaluated. According to the Cognard classification, the DAVF was Type I in four patients, Type IIa in seven, Type IIb in two, and combined Type IIa+b in seven. Nine patients had previously been treated with surgery and/or embolization, whereas 11 patients underwent radiosurgery alone. Radiosurgery was performed using multiple-isocenter irradiation of the delineated DAVF nidus. The target volume ranged from 1.7 to 40.7 cm3. The margin dose delivered to the nidus ranged from 16.5 to 19 Gy at a 50 to 70% isodose level.

Nineteen patients were available for follow-up review, the duration of which ranged from 6 to 58 months (median 19 months). Of the 19 patients, 14 (74%) were cured of their symptoms. At follow up, magnetic resonance imaging and/or angiography demonstrated complete obliteration of the DAVF in 11 patients (58%), subtotal obliteration (95% reduction of the nidus) in three (16%), and partial obliteration in another five (26%). There was no neurological complication related to the treatment. One patient experienced a recurrence of the DAVF 18 months after angiographic confirmation of total obliteration, and underwent a second course of radiosurgery.

Conclusions. Stereotactic radiosurgery provides a safe and effective option for the treatment of DAVFs involving the transverse and sigmoid sinuses. For some aggressive DAVFs with extensive retrograde cortical venous drainage, however, a combination of endovascular embolization and surgery may be necessary.

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Cheng-Chia Lee, David Hung-Chi Pan, Wen-Yuh Chung, Kang-Du Liu, Huai-Che Yang, Hsiu-Mei Wu, Wan-Yuo Guo and Yang-Hsin Shih

Object

The authors retrospectively reviewed the efficacy and safety of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in patients with brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs). The CMs had bled repeatedly and placed the patients at high risk with respect to surgical intervention.

Methods

Between 1993 and 2010, 49 patients with symptomatic CMs were treated by GKS. The mean age in these patients was 37.8 years, and the predominant sex was female (59.2%). All 49 patients experienced at least 2 instances of repeated bleeding before GKS; these hemorrhages caused neurological deficits including cranial nerve deficits, hemiparesis, hemisensory deficits, spasticity, chorea or athetosis, and consciousness disturbance.

Results

The mean size of the CMs at the time of GKS was 3.2 cm3 (range 0.1–14.6 cm3). The mean radiation dose directed to the lesion was 11 Gy with an isodose level at 60.0%. The mean clinical and imaging follow-up time was 40.6 months (range 1.0–150.7 months). Forty-five patients participated in regularly scheduled follow-up. Twenty-nine patients (59.2%) were followed up for > 2 years, and 16 (32.7%) were followed up for < 2 years. The pre-GKS annual hemorrhage rate was 31.3% (69 symptomatic hemorrhages during a total of 220.3 patient-years). After GKS, 3 episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage were observed within the first 2 years of follow-up (4.29% annual hemorrhage rate), and 3 episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage were observed after the first 2 years of follow-up (3.64% annual hemorrhage rate). In this study of 49 patients, symptomatic radiation-induced complications developed in only 2 patients (4.1%; cyst formation in 1 patient and perifocal edema with neurological deficits in the other patient). There were no deaths in this group.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery is effective in reducing the rate of recurrent hemorrhage. In the authors' experience, it was possible to control bleeding using a low-dose treatment. In addition, there were few symptomatic radiation-induced complications. As a result, the authors believe that GKS is a good alternative treatment for brainstem CMs.

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Bengt Karlsson, Wan-Yuo Guo, Teo Kejia, Nivedh Dinesh, David Hung-Chi Pan, Hidefumi Jokura, Jun Kawagishi, Albertus T. C. J. van Eck, Gerhard A. Horstmann, Tseng Tsai Yeo and Masaaki Yamamoto

Object

The optimal management of central neurocytoma (CN) remnants and recurrences is still not clear. To date no large series of patients treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for CNs has been published. For that reason the authors decided to combine data from 5 different centers so that they could analyze the largest population of patients treated with GKS for CN currently available.

Methods

Data obtained in 42 patients who were treated for CN with GKS before July 1, 2010, were retrospectively collected and analyzed. The median prescribed dose was 13 Gy (range 11–25 Gy). The follow-up time in these patients ranged from 0.5 to 14.7 years (mean 6.1 years, median 4.9 years). Eleven patients were followed up for 5–10 years and 9 patients for more than 10 years. All patients were alive and well at the closing of the study except 1 patient, who died of injuries sustained in a traffic accident.

Results

Two cases of local tumor progression and 2 cases of distant tumor recurrence occurred among the patient population, yielding 5- and 10-year tumor control rates of 91% and 81%, respectively. No permanent complications occurred. The findings were in line with results reported in earlier publications. Despite the high tumor control rate, enlargement of part of or the whole ventricular system was seen in 45% of patients.

Conclusions

The high tumor control rate and the low complication rate following GKS indicate that GKS is the preferred treatment for CN tumor remnants or recurrences following microsurgery. However, data from longer follow-up times in more patients are needed before this conclusion can be validated. The patients need to be closely monitored and potential hydrocephalus managed despite tumor control.

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Chih-Chun Wu, Wan-Yuo Guo, Wen-Yuh Chung, Hisu-Mei Wu, Chung-Jung Lin, Cheng-Chia Lee, Kang-Du Liu and Huai-che Yang

OBJECTIVE

Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is a promising treatment modality for patients with vestibular schwannomas (VSs), but a small percentage of patients have persistent postradiosurgical tumor growth. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and quantitative MRI features of VS as predictors of long-term tumor control after GKS.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective study of all patients with VS treated with GKS using the Leksell Gamma Knife Unit between 2005 and 2013 at their institution. A total of 187 patients who had a minimum of 24 months of clinical and radiological assessment after radiosurgery were included in this study. Those who underwent a craniotomy with tumor removal before and after GKS were excluded. Study patients comprised 85 (45.5%) males and 102 (54.5%) females, with a median age of 52.2 years (range 20.4–82.3 years). Tumor volumes, enhancing patterns, and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were measured by region of interest (ROI) analysis of the whole tumor by serial MRI before and after GKS.

RESULTS

The median follow-up period was 60.8 months (range 24–128.9 months), and the median treated tumor volume was 3.54 cm3 (0.1–16.2 cm3). At last follow-up, imaging studies indicated that 150 tumors (80.2%) showed decreased tumor volume, 20 (10.7%) had stabilized, and 17 (9.1%) continued to grow following radiosurgery. The postradiosurgical outcome was not significantly correlated with pretreatment volumes or postradiosurgical enhancing patterns. Tumors that showed regression within the initial 12 months following radiosurgery were more likely to have a larger volume reduction ratio at last follow-up than those that did not (volume reduction ratio 55% vs 23.6%, respectively; p < 0.001). Compared with solid VSs, cystic VSs were more likely to regress or stabilize in the initial postradiosurgical 6–12-month period and during extended follow-up. Cystic VSs exhibited a greater volume reduction ratio at last follow-up (cystic vs solid: 67.6% ± 24.1% vs 31.8% ± 51.9%; p < 0.001). The mean preradiosurgical maximum ADC (ADCmax) values of all VSs were significantly higher for those with tumor regression or stabilization at last follow-up compared with those with progression (2.391 vs 1.826 × 10−3 mm2/sec; p = 0.010).

CONCLUSIONS

Loss of central enhancement after radiosurgery was a common phenomenon, but it did not correlate with tumor volume outcome. Preradiosurgical MRI features including cystic components and ADCmax values can be helpful as predictors of treatment outcome.

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Wan-Yuo Guo, Shigeki Ono, Shizuo Oi, Shu-Huei Shen, Tai-Tong Wong, Hsiao-Wen Chung and Jeng-Hsiu Hung

Object

The authors present a novel cine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, two-dimensional (2D) fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) technique with parallel imaging. It achieves temporal resolution at less than half a second as well as high spatial resolution cine imaging free of motion artifacts for evaluating the dynamic motion of fetuses in utero. The information obtained is used to predict postnatal outcome.

Methods

Twenty-five fetuses with anomalies were studied. Ultrasonography demonstrated severe abnormalities in five of the fetuses; the other 20 fetuses constituted a control group. The cine fetal MR imaging demonstrated fetal head, neck, trunk, extremity, and finger as well as swallowing motions. Imaging findings were evaluated and compared in fetuses with major central nervous system (CNS) anomalies in five cases and minor CNS, non-CNS, or no anomalies in 20 cases. Normal motility was observed in the latter group. For fetuses in the former group, those with abnormal motility failed to survive after delivery, whereas those with normal motility survived with functioning preserved. The power deposition of radiofrequency, presented as specific absorption rate (SAR), was calculated. The SAR of FIESTA was approximately 13 times lower than that of conventional MR imaging of fetuses obtained using single-shot fast spin echo sequences.

Conclusions

The following conclusions are drawn: 1) Fetal motion is no longer a limitation for prenatal imaging after the implementation of parallel imaging with 2D FIESTA, 2) Cine MR imaging illustrates fetal motion in utero with high clinical reliability, 3) For cases involving major CNS anomalies, cine MR imaging provides information on extremity motility in fetuses and serves as a prognostic indicator of postnatal outcome, and 4) The cine MR used to observe fetal activity is technically 2D and conceptually three-dimensional. It provides four-dimensional information for making proper and timely obstetrical and/or postnatal management decisions.

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Hsiu-Mei Wu, David Hung-Chi Pan, Wen-Yuh Chung, Wan-Yuo Guo, Kang-Du Liu, Cheng-Ying Shiau, Ling-Wei Wang and Shih-Jen Chen

Object

The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the treatment of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistulas (CSDAVFs) and other intracranial dural arteriovenous fistulas (ODAVFs).

Methods

Among the 238 GKS procedures performed for intracranial DAVFs in the authors' institute, 227 cases (146 CSDAVFs and 81 OIDAVFs) with clinical follow up formed the database from which the authors determined clinical outcome and the incidence of untoward events. One hundred ninety-five cases (118 CSDAVFs and 77 ODAVFs) with imaging follow up formed the database from which the authors determined the imaging results.

Older age, female sex, higher incidence of diabetes, and shorter duration of symptoms were noted more in cases of CSDAVF than in ODAVFs. Most patients had symptomatic improvement after GKS. A symptomatic cure was observed in one patient with CSDAVFs as early as 6 weeks. The cumulative cure rate based on follow-up angiography of CSDAVFs approached 75% at 24 months, which was much better than that of ODAVFs (approximately 50% at 24 months). A neuroimaging-based cure lagged behind that of the clinical symptoms. Overall, there were only two nonfatal intracerebral hemorrhages during the follow-up period, both occurring less than 1 week after GKS and both being Cognard Type IIa+b with initial aggressive symptoms. Transient deterioration of neurological status without hemorrhage was noted in six patients with ODAVFs. Thrombosis of the superior ophthalmic vein occurred in 11 patients with CSDAVFs, in two of whom there were unilateral visual impairments. There were three cranial nerve neuropathies: transient in one CSDAVF and one ODAVF involving the jugular foramen, and another one was a CSDAVF previously treated by conventional radiotherapy.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery provides a safe and effective option for treatment of intracranial DAVFs with a low risk of complications. In cases of DAVFs with benign clinical presentation, GKS can serve as a primary treatment. In some cases of aggressive DAVFs in which there is extensive retrograde cortical vein drainage, combined treatment with embolization or surgery is suggested.

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Dennis R. Buis and W. Peter Vandertop