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Visish M. Srinivasan, Aditya Vedantam, and Peter Kan

We present a case of a patient with an anterior communicating artery aneurysm treated by PulseRider-assisted coil embolization. PulseRider is a new device, FDA approved for treatment of broad-necked aneurysms of the basilar apex or internal carotid artery terminus. The aneurysm was broad-necked and involved the anterior communicating artery and was considered for traditional stent-assisted coiling as well as PulseRider-assisted coiling. The authors present the treatment plan and strategy and then fluoroscopic recording of the PulseRider delivery and subsequent coiling phase. Nuances of technique for this new device used in a challenging setting are discussed.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/ont7ggqgLH8.

Open access

Joshua S. Catapano, Rohin Singh, Visish M. Srinivasan, and Michael T. Lawton

Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in the brainstem, specifically medullary AVMs, are exceedingly rare and difficult to treat. These lesions are commonly more aggressive than supratentorial AVMs and pose their own unique treatment challenges. Current treatment options for these AVMs consist of endovascular embolization or open surgery. Radiosurgery is not favored because it is associated with potential risk to the brainstem and lower obliteration rates. Here the authors report the case of a 27-year-old man with a ruptured anterior medullary AVM. The patient underwent a successful far-lateral craniotomy for resection of the AVM.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/lyOfOQ3sBdU

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Patrick J. Karas, Anish N. Sen, and Jared S. Fridley

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Frederick F. Lang, and Peter Kan

Oncolytic viruses (OVs) have been used in the treatment of cancer, in a focused manner, since the 1990s. These OVs have become popular in the treatment of several cancers but are only now gaining interest in the treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) in recent clinical trials. In this review, the authors discuss the unique applications of intraarterial (IA) delivery of OVs, starting with concepts of OV, how they apply to IA delivery, and concluding with discussion of the current ongoing trials. Several OVs have been used in the treatment of GBM, including specifically several modified adenoviruses. IA delivery of OVs has been performed in the hepatic circulation and is now being studied in the cerebral circulation to help enhance delivery and specificity. There are some interesting synergies with immunotherapy and IA delivery of OVs. Some of the shortcomings are discussed, specifically the systemic response to OVs and feasibility of treatment. Future studies can be performed in the preclinical setting to identify the ideal candidates for translation into clinical trials, as well as the nuances of this novel delivery method.

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Anish N. Sen, and Peter Kan

The authors present a case of a patient with a Barrow Type B carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) who presented with severe symptoms of eye redness, diplopia, and proptosis. Due to the tortuosity and size of her angular vein and the lack of good flow/access via the inferior petrosal sinus, she was treated with a transvenous approach via a large, dilated superior ophthalmic vein for coil embolization of the CCF. The patient had a full angiographic and symptomatic cure. The authors present the treatment plan and strategy and the fluoroscopic recording of the treatment. Nuances of the technique are discussed.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/ABkGm17-cBU.

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Gouthami Chintalapani, Edward A. M. Duckworth, and Peter Kan

OBJECTIVE

The evaluation of the venous neurovasculature, especially the dural venous sinuses, is most often performed using MR or CT venography. For further assessment, diagnostic cerebral angiography may be performed. Three-dimensional rotational angiography (3D-RA) can be applied to the venous system, producing 3D rotational venography (3D-RV) and cross-sectional reconstructions, which function as an adjunct to traditional 2D digital subtraction angiography.

METHODS

After querying the database of Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center in Houston, Texas, the authors reviewed the radiological and clinical data of patients who underwent 3D-RV. This modality was performed based on standard techniques for 3D-RA, with the catheter placed in the internal carotid artery and a longer x-ray delay calculated based on time difference between the early arterial phase and the venous phase.

RESULTS

Of the 12 cases reviewed, 5 patients had neoplasms invading a venous sinus, 4 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension required evaluation of venous sinus stenosis, 2 patients had venous diverticula, and 1 patient had a posterior fossa arachnoid cyst. The x-ray delay ranged from 7 to 10 seconds. The 3D-RV was used both for diagnosis and in treatment planning.

CONCLUSIONS

Three-dimensional RV and associated cross-sectional reconstructions can be used to assess the cerebral venous vasculature in a manner distinct from established modalities. Three-dimensional RV can be performed with relative ease on widely available biplane equipment, and data can be processed using standard software packages. The authors present the protocol and technique used along with potential applications to venous sinus stenosis, venous diverticula, and tumors invading the venous sinuses.

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Visish M. Srinivasan, Peter Kan, and Edward A. M. Duckworth

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John D. Nerva, Peter S. Amenta, and Aaron S. Dumont

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John D. Nerva, Peter S. Amenta, and Aaron S. Dumont