Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Vincent Dodson x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

James K. Liu and Vincent N. Dodson

Cervicomedullary gangliogliomas are rare low-grade neoplasms of the brainstem. They can be challenging lesions to resect due to the eloquent location in the brainstem. In some instances, the absence of a clear surgical plane between the tumor and normal neural tissue can prohibit a complete resection. Therefore, it is important to leave a thin rim of residual tumor at the tumor-brainstem interface in order to avoid irreversible neurological injury. In this operative video, the authors demonstrate the technique to develop a surgical pseudoplane using sharp microdissection for a cervicomedullary brainstem ganglioglioma without a clear interface between the tumor and normal neural tissue. This strategy allowed for radical near-total resection of the tumor, thereby maximizing the extent of removal while preserving neurological function. Postoperatively, the patient had normal neurological function and returned to work without any disability. In summary, due to the lack of a clear surgical dissection plane, a pseudoplane near the surgical interface can be performed using sharp dissection to facilitate radical near-total resection.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/biD4G1Hh0yk.

Open access

James K. Liu and Vincent N. Dodson

Fourth ventricular tumors have traditionally been removed via transvermian approaches, which can result in potential dysequilibrium and mutism. The telovelar approach is an excellent alternative to widely expose fourth ventricular tumors without transgressing the cerebellar vermis. This is achieved by opening the cerebellomedullary fissure and incising the tela choroidea and inferior medullary velum, which form the lower half of the roof of the fourth ventricle. In this operative video manuscript, the authors demonstrate microsurgical resection of a fourth ventricular subependymoma arising from the rhomboid fossa via the telovelar approach. The key technical nuance in this video is to demonstrate a gentle and safe technique to identify a dissectable plane to peel the tumor off of the rhomboid fossa using a microspreading technique with fine micro-bayonetted forceps. A gross-total resection was achieved, and the patient was neurologically intact.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/ZEHHbUGb9zk.

Open access

James K. Liu and Vincent N. Dodson

Brainstem cavernous malformations are formidable lesions because of their eloquent location and propensity for bleeding resulting in neurological impairment. The surgical management can be challenging due to their deep location around critical neurovascular structures. In this operative video manuscript, the authors demonstrate resection of a large recurrent pontine cavernous malformation with an exophytic component in the cerebellopontine angle via a combined petrosal approach. Both anterior and posterior (retrolabyrinthine) petrosectomies were performed to allow multi-corridor access to the lesion. Due to excessive scar formation from prior surgeries, sharp dissection was paramount to create dissection planes around the lesion. This video atlas demonstrates the operative technique and surgical nuances of the skull base approach, safe resection of the malformation through the operative corridor, gentle handling of the neurovascular structures and a multi-layered reconstruction technique to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The use of endoscopic-assisted microsurgery of the brainstem is also demonstrated. A gross total resection was achieved, and the patient improved neurologically. In summary, the combined petrosal approach with endoscopic assistance is an important strategy in the armamentarium for the surgical management of brainstem cavernous malformations.

The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/oAETW6tVc_Y.

Free access

Vincent Dodson, Neil Majmundar, Vanessa Swantic and Rachid Assina

OBJECTIVE

The use of vancomycin powder in spine surgery for prophylaxis against surgical site infections (SSIs) is well debated in the literature, with the majority of studies demonstrating improvement and some studies demonstrating no significant reduction in infection rate. It is well known in certain populations that vancomycin powder reduces the general rate of infection, but its effects on reducing the rate of infection due to gram-negative pathogens are not well reviewed. The goal of this paper was to review studies that investigated the efficacy of vancomycin powder as a prophylactic agent against SSI and demonstrate whether the rate of infections by gram-negative pathogens is impacted.

METHODS

An electronic search of the published literature was performed using PubMed and Google Scholar in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines. A variety of combinations of the search terms “vancomycin powder,” “infection,” “spine,” “gram-negative,” “prophylaxis,” and “surgical site” was used. Inclusion criteria were studies that 1) described an experimental group that received intraoperative intrawound vancomycin powder; 2) included adequately controlled groups that did not receive intraoperative intrawound vancomycin powder; 3) included the number of patients in both the experimental and control groups who developed infection after their spine surgery; and 4) identified the pathogen-causing infection. Studies not directly related to this review’s investigation were excluded from the initial screen. Among the studies that met the criteria of the initial screen, additional reasons for exclusion from the systematic review included lack of a control group, unspecified size of control groups, and inconsistent use of vancomycin powder in the experimental group.

RESULTS

This systematic review includes 21 studies with control groups. Vancomycin powder significantly reduced the relative risk of developing an SSI (RR 0.55, 95% CI 0.45–0.67, p < 0.0001). In addition, the use of vancomycin powder did not significantly increase the risk of infection by gram-negative pathogens (RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.66–1.86, p = 0.701).

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this systematic review suggest that intrawound vancomycin powder is protective against SSI. It is less clear if this treatment increases the risk of gram-negative infection. Further studies are required to investigate whether rates of infection due to gram-negative pathogens are affected by the use of vancomycin powder.

Free access

Yong Xia and Long Yi Chen

Free access

Neil Majmundar, Purvee D. Patel, Vincent Dodson, Ashley Tran, Ira Goldstein and Rachid Assina

OBJECTIVE

Although parasitic infections are endemic to parts of the developing world and are more common in areas with developing economies and poor sanitary conditions, rare cases may occur in developed regions of the world.

METHODS

Articles eligible for the authors’ literature review were initially searched using PubMed with the phrases “parasitic infections” and “spine.” After the authors developed a list of parasites associated with spinal cord infections from the initial search, they expanded it to include individual diagnoses, using search terms including “neurocysticercosis,” “schistosomiasis,” “echinococcosis,” and “toxoplasmosis.”

RESULTS

Two recent cases of parasitic spinal infections from the authors’ institution are included.

CONCLUSIONS

Key findings on imaging modalities, laboratory studies suggestive of parasitic infection, and most importantly a thorough patient history are required to correctly diagnose parasitic spinal infections.

Restricted access

Neil Majmundar, Pratit Patel, Vincent Dodson, Ivo Bach, James K. Liu, Luke Tomycz and Priyank Khandelwal

OBJECTIVE

The transradial approach (TRA) has been widely adopted by interventional cardiologists but is only now being accepted by neurointerventionalists. The benefits of the TRA over the traditional transfemoral approach (TFA) include reduced risk of adverse clinical events and faster recovery. The authors assessed the safety and feasibility of the TRA for neurointerventional cases in the pediatric population.

METHODS

Pediatric patients undergoing cerebrovascular interventions since implementation of the TRA at the authors’ institution were retrospectively reviewed. Pertinent patient information, procedure indications, vessels catheterized, fluoroscopy time, and complications were reviewed.

RESULTS

There were 4 patients in this case series, and their ages ranged from 13 to 15 years. Each patient tolerated the procedure performed using the TRA without any postprocedural issues, and only 1 patient experienced radial artery spasm, which resolved with the administration of intraarterial verapamil. None of the patients required conversion to the TFA.

CONCLUSIONS

The TRA can be considered a safe alternative to the TFA for neurointerventional procedures in the pediatric population and provides potential advantages. However, as pediatric patients require special consideration due to their smaller-caliber arteries, routine use of ultrasound guidance is advised when attempting the TRA.