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  • Author or Editor: Victor García-Navarro x
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Jeffrey C. Bedrosian, Victor Garcia-Navarro, Edward D. McCoul, Vijay K. Anand and Theodore H. Schwartz

Cholesterol granulomas (CGs) are benign, expanding cystic lesions surrounded by a thick fibrous capsule and filled with fluid, formed by the degradation of blood elements. The goal of surgery is to open the granuloma widely, creating a well-drained cavity. The endonasal endoscopic approach for this extradural lesion is a minimal access method for surgical removal or fenestration. The role of balloon dilation in creating a wide fenestration has not been previously described.

The authors describe a patient with a recurrent petrous apex CG who underwent an endoscopic, endonasal, transmaxillary transpterygoid approach to the petrous apex. A balloon sinuplasty catheter was used to dilate the surgical fenestration to maintain continued patency.

The authors report on their first experience using balloon dilation combined with endoscopic drainage of the petrous apex. The excellent surgical outcome of this minimally invasive technique holds promise for future endonasal approaches to the middle cranial fossa.

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Ignacio Madrazo Navarro, Jose Antonio Garcia Renteria, Victor Hugo Rosas Peralta and Miguel Angel Dei Castilli

✓ A transorbital technique for emergency ventricular drainage has been used successfully in comatose hydrocephalic patients. The technique is described.

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Matei A. Banu, Amancio Guerrero-Maldonado, Heather J. McCrea, Victor Garcia-Navarro, Mark M. Souweidane, Vijay K. Anand, Linda Heier, Theodore H. Schwartz and Jeffrey P. Greenfield

Object

Scarce morphometric data exist on the developing skull base as a corridor for endonasal endoscopic approaches (EEAs). Furthermore, the impact of skull base lesions on its development has not been assessed. The authors describe a novel set of anatomical parameters characterizing the developmental process as well as the utility of these parameters in preoperative planning and a feasibility assessment of EEAs for neurosurgical treatment of skull base lesions in children.

Methods

Based on specific MRI sequences in 107 pediatric patients (2–16 years of age) without skull base lesions (referred to here as the normal population), 3 sets of anatomical parameters were analyzed according to age group and sex: drilling distance, restriction sites, and working distance parameters. A separate set of patients undergoing EEAs was analyzed in similar fashion to address the impact of skull base lesions on the developmental process.

Results

The volume of the sphenoid sinus significantly increases with age, reaching 6866.4 mm3 in the 14–16 years age group, and directly correlates with the pneumatization type (r = 0.533, p = 0.0001). The pneumatization process progresses slowly in a temporal-posterior direction, as demonstrated by the growth trend of the sellar width (r = 0.428, p = 0.0001). Nasal restriction sites do not change significantly with age, with little impact on EEAs. The intercarotid distance is significantly different only in the extreme age groups (3.9 mm, p = 0.038), and has an important impact on the transsphenoidal angle and the intracranial dissection limits (r = 0.443, p < 0.0001). The 14.9° transsphenoidal angle at 2–4 years has a 37.6% significant increase in the 11–13 years age group (p = 0.001) and is highly dependent on pneumatization type. Age-dependent differences between working parameters are mostly noted for the extreme age groups, such as the 8.6-mm increase in nare-vomer distance (p = 0.025). The nare-sellar distance is the only parameter with significant differences based on sex. Skull base lesions induce a high degree of variance in skull base measurements, delaying development and decreasing parameter values. Skull base parameters are interdependent. Nare-sellar distance can be used to assess global skull base development because it highly correlates with the intercarotid distance in both the normal population and in patients harboring skull base lesions.

Conclusions

Skull base development is a slow, gradual, age-dependent, sex-independent process significantly altering endonasal endoscopic corridors. Preoperative MRI measurements of the pediatric skull base are thus a useful adjunct in choosing the appropriate corridor and in assessing working angles and limits during dissection or reparative surgery. Skull base lesions can significantly impact normal skull base development and age-dependent growth patterns.

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Victor Garcia-Navarro, Guido Lancman, Amancio Guerrero-Maldonado, Vijay K. Anand and Theodore H. Schwartz

Object

Accessing intra- and extradural tumors via an endonasal approach requires working safely in a relatively narrow area with unobstructed visibility. The authors describe their experience to highlight the utility of a side-cutting aspiration device for endoscopic endonasal resection of skull base tumors.

Methods

The authors used this device in 13 nonconsecutive endoscopic endonasal procedures for different skull base tumors (8 pituitary macroadenomas, 2 craniopharyngiomas, 1 chordoma, 1 recurrent ependymoma, and 1 lymphoma). Illustrative cases and video are presented to demonstrate its use.

Results

The instrument was easy to use and effective in the removal of the lesions presented in this series. In 10 patients (77%), gross-total resection was possible; in the other 3 patients (23%), more than 80% of the tumor was resected. No collateral tissue damage or any other complication resulted from device-related debulking or aspiration.

Conclusions

The side-cutting tissue resector is a safe, easy to use, and effective tool for internal debulking and extracapsular dissection of nonvascularized tumors that are too firm for bimanual suction or blunt ring curette dissection. It is particularly useful when working through a deep and narrow corridor such as is encountered in endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery.

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Samuel Romero-Vargas, José Luis Ruiz-Sandoval, Arturo Sotomayor-González, Rogelio Revuelta-Gutiérrez, Miguel Angel Celis-López, Juan Luis Gómez-Amador, Ulises García-González, Raul López-Serna, Victor García-Navarro, Diego Mendez-Rosito, Victor Correa-Correa and Sergio Gómez-Llata

Induced deformation of the cranial vault is one form of permanent alteration of the body that has been performed by human beings from the beginning of history as a way of differentiating from others. These procedures have been observed in different cultures, but were particularly widespread in Mesoamerica. The authors examined and reviewed the historical and anthropological literature of intentional deformation practices in Mayan culture. The Mayans performed different types of cranial deformations and used different techniques and instruments to deform children's heads. The most remarkable morphological alteration is seen in the flattening of the frontal bone. Some archeological investigations link deformation types with specific periods. This article provides a glance at the cultural environment of the Mayans and demonstrates the heterogeneity of this interesting cultural phenomenon, which has changed over time.