Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for

  • Author or Editor: Veronica L. S. Chiang x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Veronica L. Chiang, Phillipe Gailloud, Kieran J. Murphy, Daniele Rigamonti, and Rafael J. Tamargo

Object. The routine use of intraoperative angiography as an aid in the surgical treatment of aneurysms is uncommon. The advantages of the ability to visualize residual aneurysm or unintended occlusion of parent vessels intraoperatively must be weighed against the complications associated with repeated angiography and prolonged vascular access. The authors reviewed the results of their routine use of intraoperative angiography to determine its safety and efficacy.

Methods. Prospectively gathered data from all aneurysm cases treated surgically between January 1996 and June 2000 were reviewed. A total of 303 operations were performed in 284 patients with aneurysms; 24 patients also underwent postoperative angiography. Findings on intraoperative angiographic studies prompted reexploration and clip readjustment in 37 (11%) of the 337 aneurysms clipped. Angiography revealed parent vessel occlusion in 10 cases (3%), residual aneurysm in 22 cases (6.5%), and both residual lesion and parent vessel occlusion in five cases (1.5%). When compared with subsequent postoperative imaging, false-negative results were found on two intraoperative angiograms (8.3%) and a false-positive result was found on one (4.2%). Postoperative angiograms obtained in both false-negative cases revealed residual anterior communicating artery aneurysms. Both of these aneurysms also subsequently rebled, requiring reoperation. In the group that underwent intraoperative angiography, in 303 operations eight patients (2.6%) suffered complications, of which only one was neurological.

Conclusions. In the surgical treatment of intracranial aneurysms, the use of routine intraoperative angiography is safe and helpful in a significant number of cases, although it does not replace careful intraoperative inspection of the surgical field.

Restricted access

Jonathan P. S. Knisely, Masaaki Yamamoto, Cary P. Gross, William A. Castrucci, Hidefumi Jokura, and Veronica L. S. Chiang

Object

Oligometastatic brain metastases may be treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone, but no consensus exists as to when SRS alone would be appropriate. A survey was conducted at 2 radiosurgery meetings to determine which factors SRS practitioners emphasize in recommending SRS alone, and what physician characteristics are associated with recommending SRS alone for ≥ 5 metastases.

Methods

All physicians attending the 8th Biennial Congress and Exhibition of the International Stereotactic Radiosurgery Society in June 2007 and the 18th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Society of Stereotactic Radiosurgery in July 2009 were asked to complete a questionnaire ranking 14 clinical factors on a 5-point Likert-type scale (ranging from 1 = not important to 5 = very important) to determine how much each factor might influence a decision to recommend SRS alone for brain metastases. Results were condensed into a single dichotomous outcome variable of “influential” (4–5) versus “not influential” (1–3). Respondents were also asked to complete the statement: “In general, a reasonable number of brain metastases treatable by SRS alone would be, at most, ___.” The characteristics of physicians willing to recommend SRS alone for ≥ 5 metastases were assessed. Chi-square was used for univariate analysis, and logistic regression for multivariate analysis.

Results

The final study sample included 95 Gamma Knife and LINAC-using respondents (54% Gamma Knife users) in San Francisco and 54 in Sendai (48% Gamma Knife users). More than 70% at each meeting had ≥ 5 years experience with SRS. Sixty-five percent in San Francisco and 83% in Sendai treated ≥ 30 cases annually with SRS. The highest number of metastases considered reasonable to treat with SRS alone in both surveys was 50. In San Francisco, the mean and median numbers of metastases considered reasonable to treat with SRS alone were 6.7 and 5, while in Sendai they were 11 and 10. In the San Francisco sample, the clinical factors identified to be most influential in decision making were Karnofsky Performance Scale score (78%), presence/absence of mass effect (76%), and systemic disease control (63%). In Sendai, the most influential factors were the size of the metastases (78%), the Karnofsky Performance Scale score (70%), and metastasis location (68%). In San Francisco, 55% of respondents considered treating ≥ 5 metastases and 22% considered treating ≥ 10 metastases “reasonable.” In Sendai, 83% of respondents considered treating ≥ 5 metastases and 57% considered treating ≥ 10 metastases “reasonable.” In both groups, private practitioners, neurosurgeons, and Gamma Knife users were statistically significantly more likely to treat ≥ 5 metastases with SRS alone.

Conclusions

Although there is no clear consensus for how many metastases are reasonable to treat with SRS alone, more than half of the radiosurgeons at 2 international meetings were willing to extend the use of SRS as an initial treatment for ≥ 5 brain metastases. Given the substantial variation in clinicians' approaches to SRS use, further research is required to identify patient characteristics associated with optimal SRS outcomes.

Full access

Jonathan P. S. Knisely, James B. Yu, Jaclyn Flanigan, Mario Sznol, Harriet M. Kluger, and Veronica L. S. Chiang

Object

A prospectively collected cohort of 77 patients who underwent definitive radiosurgery between 2002 and 2010 for melanoma brain metastases was retrospectively reviewed to assess the impact of ipilimumab use and other clinical variables on survival.

Methods

The authors conducted an institutional review board–approved chart review to assess patient age at the time of brain metastasis diagnosis, sex, primary disease location, initial radiosurgery date, number of metastases treated, performance status, systemic therapy and ipilimumab history, whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) use, follow-up duration, and survival at the last follow-up. The Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (DSGPA) score was calculated for each patient based on performance status and the number of brain metastases treated.

Results

Thirty-five percent of the patients received ipilimumab. The median survival in this group was 21.3 months, as compared with 4.9 months in patients who did not receive ipilimumab. The 2-year survival rate was 47.2% in the ipilimumab group compared with 19.7% in the nonipilimumab group. The DS-GPA score was the most significant predictor of overall survival, and ipilimumab therapy was also independently associated with an improvement in the hazard for death (p = 0.03).

Conclusions

The survival of patients with melanoma brain metastases managed with ipilimumab and definitive radiosurgery can exceed the commonly anticipated 4–6 months. Using ipilimumab in a supportive treatment paradigm of radiosurgery for brain oligometastases was associated with an increased median survival from 4.9 to 21.3 months, with a 2-year survival rate of 19.7% versus 47.2%. This association between ipilimumab and prolonged survival remains significant even after adjustment for performance status without an increased need for salvage WBRT.

Full access

Henry S. Park, Elyn H. Wang, Charles E. Rutter, Christopher D. Corso, Veronica L. Chiang, and James B. Yu

OBJECT

Single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a crucial component in the management of limited brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Intracranial SRS has traditionally been delivered using a frame-based Gamma Knife (GK) platform, but stereotactic modifications to the linear accelerator (LINAC) have made an alternative approach possible. In the absence of definitive prospective trials comparing the efficacy and toxicities of treatment between the 2 techniques, nonclinical factors (such as technology accessibility, costs, and efficiency) may play a larger role in determining which radiosurgery system a facility may choose to install. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to investigate national patterns of GK SRS versus LINAC SRS use and to determine which factors may be associated with the adoption of these radiosurgery systems.

METHODS

The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients > 18 years old with NSCLC who were treated with single-fraction SRS to the brain between 2003 and 2011. Patients who received “SRS not otherwise specified” or who did not receive a radiotherapy dose within the range of 12–24 Gy were excluded to reduce the potential for misclassification. The chi-square test, t-test, and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used to compare potential demographic, clinicopathologic, and health care system predictors of GK versus LINAC SRS use, when appropriate.

RESULTS

This study included 1780 patients, among whom 1371 (77.0%) received GK SRS and 409 (23.0%) underwent LINAC SRS. Over time, the proportion of patients undergoing LINAC SRS steadily increased, from 3.2% in 2003 to 30.8% in 2011 (p < 0.001). LINAC SRS was adopted more rapidly by community versus academic facilities (overall 29.2% vs 17.2%, p < 0.001). On multivariable analysis, 4 independent predictors of increased LINAC SRS use emerged, including year of diagnosis in 2008–2011 versus 2003–2007 (adjusted OR [AOR] 2.04, 95% CI 1.52–2.73, p < 0.001), community versus academic facility type (AOR 2.04, 95% CI 1.60–2.60, p < 0.001), non-West versus West geographic location (AOR 4.50, 95% CI 2.87–7.09, p < 0.001), and distance from cancer reporting facility of < 20 versus ≥ 20 miles (AOR 1.57, 95% CI 1.21–2.04, p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

GK remains the most commonly used single-fraction SRS modality for NSCLC brain metastases in the US. However, LINAC-based SRS has been rapidly disseminating in the past decade, especially in the community setting. Wide geographic variation persists in the distribution of GK and LINAC SRS cases. Further comparative effectiveness research will be needed to evaluate the impact of these shifts on SRS-related toxicities, local control, and survival, as well as treatment costs and efficiency.

Free access

Nataniel H. Lester-Coll, Arie P. Dosoretz, William J. Magnuson, Maxwell S. Laurans, Veronica L. Chiang, and James B. Yu

OBJECTIVE

The JLGK0901 study found that stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a safe and effective treatment option for treating up to 10 brain metastases. The purpose of this study is to determine the cost-effectiveness of treating up to 10 brain metastases with SRS, whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), or SRS and immediate WBRT (SRS+WBRT).

METHODS

A Markov model was developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of SRS, WBRT, and SRS+WBRT in patients with 1 or 2–10 brain metastases. Transition probabilities were derived from the JLGK0901 study and modified according to the recurrence rates observed in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9508 and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 22952–26001 studies to simulate the outcomes for patients who receive WBRT. Costs are based on 2015 Medicare reimbursements. Health state utilities were prospectively collected using the Standard Gamble method. End points included cost, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). The willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold was $100,000 per QALY. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses explored uncertainty with regard to the model assumptions.

RESULTS

In patients with 1 brain metastasis, the ICERs for SRS versus WBRT, SRS versus SRS+WBRT, and SRS+WBRT versus WBRT were $117,418, $51,348, and $746,997 per QALY gained, respectively. In patients with 2–10 brain metastases, the ICERs were $123,256, $58,903, and $821,042 per QALY gained, respectively. On the sensitivity analyses, the model was sensitive to the cost of SRS and the utilities associated with stable post-SRS and post-WBRT states. In patients with 2–10 brain metastases, SRS versus WBRT becomes cost-effective if the cost of SRS is reduced by $3512. SRS versus WBRT was also cost effective at a WTP of $200,000 per QALY on the probabilistic sensitivity analysis.

CONCLUSIONS

The most cost-effective strategy for patients with up to 10 brain metastases is SRS alone relative to SRS+WBRT. SRS alone may also be cost-effective relative to WBRT alone, but this depends on WTP, the cost of SRS, and patient preferences.

Restricted access

Andy J. Redmond, Michael L. DiLuna, Ryan Hebert, Jennifer A. Moliterno, Rani Desai, Jonathan P. S. Knisely, and Veronica L. Chiang

Object

Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) improves overall survival in patients with malignant melanoma metastatic to the brain. In this study the authors investigated which patient- or treatment-specific factors influence survival of patients with melanoma brain metastases; they pay particular interest to pre- and post-GKS hemorrhage.

Methods

Demographic, treatment, and survival data on 59 patients with a total of 208 intracranial metastases who underwent GKS between 1998 and 2007 were abstracted from treatment records and from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors that independently affected survival.

Results

Survival was significantly better in patients with solitary metastasis (p = 0.04), lesions without evidence of pre-GKS hemorrhage (p = 0.004), and in patients with total tumor volume treated < 4 cm3 (p = 0.02). Intratumoral bleeding occurred in 23.7% of patients pre-GKS. Intratumoral bleeding occurred at a mean of 1.8 months post-GKS at a rate of 15.2%. Unlike the marked effect of pretreatment bleeding, posttreatment bleeding did not independently affect survival. Sex, systemic control, race, metastases location, whole-brain radiation therapy, chemotherapy, history of antithrombotic medications, and cranial surgery had no independent association with survival.

Conclusions

These data corroborate previous findings that tumor burden (either as increased number or total volume of lesions) at the time of GKS is associated with diminished patient survival in those with intracerebral melanoma metastases. Patients who were noted to have hemorrhagic melanoma metastases prior to GKS appear to have a worse prognosis following GKS compared with patients with nonhemorrhagic metastases, despite similar rates of bleeding pre- and post-GKS treatment. Gamma Knife surgery itself does not appear to increase the rate of hemorrhage.

Restricted access

Roberto C. Heros

Free access

Benjamin H. Kann, James B. Yu, John M. Stahl, James E. Bond, Christopher Loiselle, Veronica L. Chiang, Ranjit S. Bindra, Jason L. Gerrard, and David J. Carlson

OBJECTIVE

Functional Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) procedures have been increasingly used for treating patients with tremor, trigeminal neuralgia (TN), and refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder. Although its rates of toxicity are low, GKRS has been associated with some, if low, risks for serious sequelae, including hemiparesis and even death. Anecdotal reports have suggested that even with a standardized prescription dose, rates of functional GKRS toxicity increase after replacement of an old cobalt-60 source with a new source. Dose rate changes over the course of the useful lifespan of cobalt-60 are not routinely considered in the study of patients treated with functional GKRS, but these changes may be associated with significant variation in the biologically effective dose (BED) delivered to neural tissue.

METHODS

The authors constructed a linear-quadratic model of BED in functional GKRS with a dose-protraction factor to correct for intrafraction DNA-damage repair and used standard single-fraction doses for trigeminal nerve ablation for TN (85 Gy), thalamotomy for tremor (130 Gy), and capsulotomy for obsessive-compulsive disorder (180 Gy). Dose rate and treatment time for functional GKRS involving 4-mm collimators were derived from calibrations in the authors' department and from the cobalt-60 decay rate. Biologically plausible values for the ratio for radiosensitivity to fraction size (α/β) and double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair halftimes (τ) were estimated from published experimental data. The biphasic characteristics of DSB repair in normal tissue were accounted for in deriving an effective τ1 halftime (fast repair) and τ2 halftime (slow repair). A sensitivity analysis was performed with a range of plausible parameter values.

RESULTS

After replacement of the cobalt-60 source, the functional GKRS dose rate rose from 1.48 to 2.99 Gy/min, treatment time fell, and estimated BED increased. Assuming the most biologically plausible parameters, source replacement resulted in an immediate relative BED increase of 11.7% for GKRS-based TN management with 85 Gy, 15.6% for thalamotomy with 130 Gy, and 18.6% for capsulotomy with 180 Gy. Over the course of the 63-month lifespan of the cobalt-60 source, BED decreased annually by 2.2% for TN management, 3.0% for thalamotomy, and 3.5% for capsulotomy.

CONCLUSIONS

Use of a new cobalt-60 source after replacement of an old source substantially increases the predicted BED for functional GKRS treatments for the same physical dose prescription. Source age, dose rate, and treatment time should be considered in the study of outcomes after high-dose functional GKRS treatments. Animal and clinical studies are needed to determine how this potential change in BED contributes to GKRS toxicity and whether technical adjustments should be made to reduce dose rates or prescription doses with newer cobalt-60 sources.