Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Vera Ong x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Carlito Lagman, Vera Ong, Lawrance K. Chung, Lekaa Elhajjmoussa, Christina Fong, Anthony C. Wang, Quinton Gopen, and Isaac Yang

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study is to present an illustrative case of pediatric superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SSCD) and to systematically review the current published literature in the pediatric population.

METHODS

An electronic search of the Scopus, Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane, and Embase databases was performed by 2 independent authors through January 2017. Search term combinations included “pediatrics,” “children,” “canal,” and “dehiscence.” Inclusion criteria were as follows: English, full-text clinical studies, case reports, and case series describing pediatric patient(s) (younger than 18 years) with CT evidence of SSCD. Baseline patient demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, dehiscence characteristics, management strategies, and outcome data were extracted.

RESULTS

A total of 14 studies involving 122 patients were included in the quantitative synthesis. The patients’ mean age was 7.22 years. Male predominance was observed (approximate male-to-female ratio of 1.65:1). Neurodevelopmental disorders were common (n = 14, 11.5%). Auditory signs and symptoms were more common than vestibular signs and symptoms. Hearing loss (n = 62, 50.8%) was the most common auditory symptom and an indicator for imaging evaluation. Vertigo was the most common vestibular symptom (n = 8, 6.6%). Hearing aids were recommended in 8 cases (6.6%), and surgical repair was performed in 1 case (0.8%). Symptom outcomes and follow-up durations were infrequently reported.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors’ data suggest that in pediatric SSCD, males are more commonly affected than females. This is different than the adult population in which females are predominantly affected. A history of otologic and/or neurodevelopmental abnormalities was common. There was a preponderance of auditory symptoms in this age group. Conservative management was favored in the majority.

Full access

Carlito Lagman, Vera Ong, Thien Nguyen, Yasmine Alkhalid, John P. Sheppard, Prasanth Romiyo, Daniel Azzam, Giyarpuram N. Prashant, Reza Jahan, and Isaac Yang

OBJECTIVE

Meningiomas that appear hypervascular on neuroimaging could be amenable to preoperative embolization. However, methods for measuring hypervascularity have not been described, nor has the benefit of preoperative embolization been adjudicated. The objective of this study was to show a relationship between flow void volume (measured on MRI) and intraoperative estimated blood loss (EBL) in nonembolized meningiomas.

METHODS

The authors performed volumetric analyses of 51 intracranial meningiomas (21 preoperatively embolized) resected at their institution. Through the use of image segmentation software and a voxel-based segmentation method, flow void volumes were measured on T2-weighted MR images. This metric was named the Meningioma Vascularity Index (MVI). The primary outcomes were intraoperative EBL and perioperative blood transfusion.

RESULTS

In the nonembolized group, the MVI correlated with intraoperative EBL when controlling for tumor volume (r = 0.55, p = 0.002). The MVI also correlated with perioperative blood transfusion (point-biserial correlation [rpb] = 0.57, p = 0.001). A greater MVI was associated with an increased risk of blood transfusion (odds ratio [OR] 5.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15–29.15) and subtotal resection (OR 7.64, 95% CI 1.74–33.58). In the embolized group, those relationships were not found. There were no significant differences in MVI, intraoperative EBL, or blood transfusion across groups.

CONCLUSIONS

This study clearly shows a relationship between MVI and intraoperative EBL in nonembolized meningiomas when controlling for tumor volume. The MVI is a potential biomarker for tumors that would benefit from embolization.

Restricted access

Nolan J. Brown, Elliot H. Choi, Julian L. Gendreau, Vera Ong, Alexander Himstead, Brian V. Lien, Shane Shahrestani, Seth C. Ransom, Katelynn Tran, Ali R. Tafreshi, Ronald Sahyouni, Alvin Chan, and Michael Y. Oh

OBJECTIVE

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic agent associated with reduced blood loss and mortality in a wide range of procedures, including spine surgery, traumatic brain injury, and craniosynostosis. Despite this wide use, the safety and efficacy of TXA in spine surgery has been considered controversial due to a relative scarcity of literature and lack of statistical power in reported studies. However, if TXA can be shown to reduce blood loss in laminectomy with fusion and posterior instrumentation, more surgeons may include it in their armamentarium. The authors aimed to conduct an up-to-date systematic review and meta-analysis of the efficacy of TXA in reducing blood loss in laminectomy and fusion with posterior instrumentation.

METHODS

A systematic review and meta-analysis, abiding by PRISMA guidelines, was performed by searching the databases of PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane. These platforms were queried for all studies reporting the use of TXA in laminectomy and fusion with posterior instrumentation. Variables retrieved included patient demographics, surgical indications, involved spinal levels, type of laminectomy performed, TXA administration dose, TXA route of administration, operative duration, blood loss, blood transfusion rate, postoperative hemoglobin level, and perioperative complications. Heterogeneity across studies was evaluated using a chi-square test, Cochran’s Q test, and I2 test performed with R statistical programming software.

RESULTS

A total of 7 articles were included in the qualitative study, while 6 articles featuring 411 patients underwent statistical analysis. The most common route of administration for TXA was intravenous with 15 mg/kg administered preoperatively. After the beginning of surgery, TXA administration patterns were varied among studies. Blood transfusions were increased in non-TXA cohorts compared to TXA cohorts. Patients administered TXA demonstrated a significant reduction in blood loss (mean difference −218.44 mL; 95% CI −379.34 to −57.53; p = 0.018). TXA administration was not associated with statistically significant reductions in operative durations. There were no adverse events reported in either the TXA or non-TXA patient cohorts.

CONCLUSIONS

TXA can significantly reduce perioperative blood loss in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar laminectomy and fusion procedures, while demonstrating a minimal complication profile.