Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Ulrike Ernemann x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Constantin Roder, Till-Karsten Hauser, Ulrike Ernemann, Marcos Tatagiba, Nadia Khan and Benjamin Bender

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate chronological patterns of arterial wall contrast enhancement in contrast-enhanced high-resolution MRI (CE-HR-MRI) in patients with moyamoya disease (MMD).

METHODS

The authors performed a blinded analysis of clinical and imaging data from MMD patients. Data were analyzed chronologically for each patient and the intensity of arterial wall enhancement was correlated with the clinical and imaging-based progression status of the disease.

RESULTS

A total of 31 MMD patients and 61 imaging time points were included. CE-HR-MRI results were available for 56 time points, representing 112 hemispheric analyses. No arterial wall contrast enhancement (grade 1) was seen in 54 (48%) of the analyses, mild enhancement (grade 2) in 24 (21%), moderate enhancement (grade 3) in 15 (13%), and strong (grade 4) mainly concentric arterial wall contrast enhancement in 19 (17%). Grade 4 contrast enhancement was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with clinical disease progression within 6 months (before or after the MRI) compared to grades 1–3, with positive and negative predictive values of 0.8 and 0.88, respectively. Grades 1 and 2 (no contrast enhancement and only mild contrast enhancement) were highly predictive for stable disease (negative predictive value: 0.95).

CONCLUSIONS

A specific chronological increasing and decreasing pattern of arterial wall contrast enhancement associated with “beginning” as well as progression of angiopathy occurs in MMD patients. In clinical practice, CE-HR-MRI of the arterial wall may help to identify patients at risk of new strokes caused by disease progression and hence impel early treatment for future stroke prevention. Understanding of this temporary enhancement of the arterial wall might also bring new insights into the etiology of MMD.

Restricted access

Hendrik Juenger, Volker Ressel, Christoph Braun, Ulrike Ernemann, Martin Schuhmann, Ingeborg Krägeloh-Mann and Martin Staudt

Functional MR imaging is dependent on the hemodynamic response function of the brain. Cerebrovascular anomalies may lead to hemodynamic artifacts, contorting the true localization of neural activation. This is illustrated in the case of a 4-year-old boy with an arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the left central region undergoing extensive functional mapping prior to surgical removal. Intraoperative electrophysiological recording confirmed presurgical results of magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) examinations, detecting the sensorimotor hand representation within the brain tissue into which the AVM extended, whereas the activation demonstrated by functional MR (fMR) imaging was proven to be falsely localized by that modality, which showed it to be posterior to the affected central region. Thus, this case demonstrates that functional mapping can be performed even in very young patients and that combining fMR imaging with TMS and MEG is especially important in patients with vascular lesions, in whom fMR imaging can be misleading due to changes in blood flow.

Full access

Constantin Roder, Edyta Charyasz-Leks, Martin Breitkopf, Karlheinz Decker, Ulrike Ernemann, Uwe Klose, Marcos Tatagiba and Sotirios Bisdas

OBJECTIVE

The authors' aim in this paper is to prove the feasibility of resting-state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) in an intraoperative setting (iRS-fMRI) and to correlate findings with the clinical condition of patients pre- and postoperatively.

METHODS

Twelve patients underwent intraoperative MRI-guided resection of lesions in or directly adjacent to the central region and/or pyramidal tract. Intraoperative RS (iRS)–fMRI was performed pre- and intraoperatively and was correlated with patients' postoperative clinical condition, as well as with intraoperative monitoring results. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to postprocess the RS-fMRI data concerning the sensorimotor networks, and the mean z-scores were statistically analyzed.

RESULTS

iRS-fMRI in anesthetized patients proved to be feasible and analysis revealed no significant differences in preoperative z-scores between the sensorimotor areas ipsi- and contralateral to the tumor. A significant decrease in z-score (p < 0.01) was seen in patients with new neurological deficits postoperatively. The intraoperative z-score in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the tumor had a significant negative correlation with the degree of paresis immediately after the operation (r = −0.67, p < 0.001) and on the day of discharge from the hospital (r = −0.65, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated moderate prognostic value of the intraoperative z-score (area under the curve 0.84) for the paresis score at patient discharge.

CONCLUSIONS

The use of iRS-fMRI with ICA-based postprocessing and functional activity mapping is feasible and the results may correlate with clinical parameters, demonstrating a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the iRS-fMRI signal and the postoperative neurological changes.

Full access

Michael Bitzer, Lars Wöckel, Andreas R. Luft, Ajay K. Wakhloo, Dirk Petersen, Holger Opitz, Theo Sievert, Ulrike Ernemann and Karsten Voigt

The authors studied the pial and dural blood supplies in 74 intracranial meningiomas and quantified their associated peritumoral brain edema (PTBE). The extent and localization of pial blush in relation to the total tumor volume were determined angiographically. The amount of edema and tumor size were calculated using computerized tomography. The edema-tumor volume ratio was defined as Edema Index (EI). There were 49 meningiomas with PTBE; of those tumors, 46 were supplied by pial vessels, and three were supplied exclusively by dural vessels. Tumors without PTBE showed no pial blush. The mean EI in meningiomas with pial blush was significantly larger (EI = 3.0) than in meningiomas without pial supply (EI = 1.1; p < 0.0001). Meningiomas in which 10% of the whole tumor volume was supplied by pial vessels had only a small mean EI of 2.2, whereas tumors with pial blood supply greater than or equal to 20% had a mean EI of 3.3 (p < 0.026). In 69.9% of cases with pial blood supply, major portions of the edema were located adjacent to the tumor region supplied by pial vessels. Edema index differences among tumors of different subgroups, as defined by size or histology, were significantly related to the pial supply in each subset. Thus, pial blood supply may be causative for the development of PTBE in meningiomas.

Restricted access

Michael Bitzer, Lars Wöckel, Andreas R. Luft, Ajay K. Wakhloo, Dirk Petersen, Holger Opitz, Theo Sievert, Ulrike Ernemann and Karsten Voigt

✓ In a retrospective analysis, the authors studied the pial and dural blood supplies in 74 intracranial meningiomas and quantified their associated peritumoral brain edema (PTBE). The extent and localization of pial blush in relation to the total tumor volume were determined angiographically. The amount of edema and tumor size were calculated using computerized tomography. The edema—tumor volume ratio was defined as Edema Index (EI). There were 49 meningiomas with PTBE; of those tumors, 46 were supplied by pial vessels, and three were supplied exclusively by dural vessels. Tumors without PTBE showed no pial blush. The mean EI in meningiomas with pial blush was significantly larger (EI = 3) than in meningiomas without pial supply (EI = 1.1; p < 0.0001). Meningiomas with a smaller pial supply than dural supply had a significantly smaller mean EI than tumors with a pial supply equal to or greater than the dural supply (EI = 2.9 vs. EI = 3.7; p < 0.015). In 69.9% of cases with pial blood supply, major portions of the edema were located adjacent to the tumor region supplied by pial vessels. Edema index differences among tumors of different subgroups, as defined by size or histology, were significantly related to the pial supply in each subset. Thus, pial blood supply may be associated with the development of PTBE in meningiomas.