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George W. Koutsouras, Redi Rahmani, Tyler Schmidt, Howard Silberstein and Tarun Bhalla

Neonatal dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are rare, but if left untreated will advance to life-threatening neurological and cardiovascular compromise. Endovascular treatment is the preferred treatment modality for DAVFs. The goal of endovascular therapy is to obliterate feeding vasculature and prevent secondary complications. Endovascular access can be difficult to obtain in a neonate. The authors present the case of a full-term, normal birth weight neonate with severe congestive heart failure secondary to a congenital DAVF of the torcular herophili that was successfully treated with transumbilical arterial coil embolization and a liquid embolic agent.

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Gabrielle Santangelo, Jonathan Stone, Tyler Schmidt, G. Edward Vates, Howard Silberstein and Pierre Girgis

Penetrating spinal injuries by wood are infrequently reported. They are particularly rare in children. Only 6 cases of wooden fragments causing penetrating intradural spinal injury have been reported. The authors report a case of a 3-year-old girl who suffered a penetrating wound on her lower back after sliding on a wood floor. A portion of the extraspinal part of the wooden splinter was removed prior to presentation; however, a high suspicion for retained foreign body was maintained. Findings on CT were equivocal, but the diagnosis was confirmed on MRI. An incomplete cauda equina syndrome was noted on examination. She was taken to the operating room for removal of the wooden foreign body, repair of a durotomy, and repair of a CSF leak. At 8 months after surgery, the patient had fully recovered without sequelae. The roles of imaging modalities, prophylactic antibiotics, and surgery are discussed.

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Tyler M. Schmidt, Ian A. DeAndrea-Lazarus, Kristopher T. Kimmell, G. Edward Vates, Stephen J. Haines and Webster H. Pilcher

The William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship, celebrating its 50th anniversary, is an annual award given by the AANS and administered by the Neurosurgery Research and Education Foundation (NREF). Named after its benefactor, Dr. William Van Wagenen, the fellowship continues his legacy of mentorship and innovation. As the premier research award for young neurosurgeons, it has provided a foundation for career development for many thought leaders in the field. The award was created in the spirit of Van Wagenen’s belief in collaboration with other institutions as a means of refining neurosurgical technique, creating new research initiatives, and improving patient outcomes. Van Wagenen’s commitment was informed by his early experiences in neurosurgery with his mentor Dr. Harvey Cushing, who helped to fund Van Wagenen’s scientific endeavors in Europe. This journey catalyzed Van Wagenen’s lifelong commitment to mentorship, which is exemplified by his instrumental role in the creation of the Harvey Cushing Society, now the AANS. Over the last 50 years, the recipients of this award have used the endowment to lay the groundwork for many scientific and technical innovations in neurosurgery. The fellowship remains an unmatched opportunity to explore new lines of investigation, foster academic and research goals, incorporate new technology and skills into American neurosurgical practice, and motivate young neurosurgeons to transform the field. The legacy of mentorship, scientific inquiry, and clinical excellence personified by Cushing and Van Wagenen is memorialized in the William P. Van Wagenen Fellowship.

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George W. Koutsouras, Redi Rahmani, Tyler Schmidt, Howard Silberstein and Tarun Bhalla

Neonatal dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) are rare, but if left untreated will advance to life-threatening neurological and cardiovascular compromise. Endovascular treatment is the preferred treatment modality for DAVFs. The goal of endovascular therapy is to obliterate feeding vasculature and prevent secondary complications. Endovascular access can be difficult to obtain in a neonate. The authors present the case of a full-term, normal birth weight neonate with severe congestive heart failure secondary to a congenital DAVF of the torcular herophili that was successfully treated with transumbilical arterial coil embolization and a liquid embolic agent.

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Oral Presentations

2010 AANS Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania May 1–5, 2010