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  • Author or Editor: Toru Doi x
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Toru Doi, Hideki Nakamoto, Koji Nakajima, Shima Hirai, Yusuke Sato, So Kato, Yuki Taniguchi, Yoshitaka Matsubayashi, Ko Matsudaira, Katsushi Takeshita, Sakae Tanaka and Yasushi Oshima

OBJECTIVE

Preoperative mood disorders such as depression and anxiety are known to be associated with poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes after lumbar spine surgery. However, the effects of preoperative depression and anxiety on postoperative HRQOL outcomes and patient satisfaction in cervical compressive myelopathy are yet to be clarified. This study aimed to investigate the effect of depression and anxiety on HRQOL outcomes and patient satisfaction following surgery for cervical compressive myelopathy.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the cases of all consecutive patients with cervical compressive myelopathy who had undergone surgical treatment in the period between January 2012 and March 2017 at their institution. Using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the authors classified patients as depressed (HADS-D+) or not depressed (HADS-D−) and anxious (HADS-A+) or not anxious (HADS-A−). Patient HRQOL was evaluated preoperatively and at the end of at least 1 year after surgery using the physical and mental component summaries of the SF-12 Health Survey, EQ-5D (EuroQol health survey of five dimensions), Neck Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale. Patient satisfaction was evaluated on the basis of a seven-item questionnaire and divided into two categories: satisfied and dissatisfied. Preoperative HRQOL statuses, postoperative improvements in HRQOL outcomes, and patient satisfaction were compared between the groups.

RESULTS

Among the 121 patients eligible for inclusion in the study, there were 69 patients (57.0%) without depression (HADS-D−) and 52 (43.0%) with depression (HADS-D+) and 82 patients (67.8%) without anxiety (HADS-A−) and 39 (32.2%) with anxiety (HADS-A+). All patients who completed both the preoperative and postoperative questionnaires had significant postoperative improvements in all HRQOL outcomes. The HADS-D+ and HADS-A+ patients had poorer preoperative HRQOL statuses than the HADS-D− and HADS-A− patients, respectively. However, statistically significant improvements in all HRQOL outcomes were observed in both HADS-D+ and HADS-A+ patients. Patient satisfaction was comparable between the HADS-D or HADS-A groups.

CONCLUSIONS

Cervical compressive myelopathy patients with preoperative depression or anxiety according to the HADS tool had worse preoperative HRQOL statuses. However, patients with cervical compressive myelopathy showed significant improvements in HRQOL outcomes and had sufficient levels of satisfaction after surgery regardless of the presence of preoperative depression or anxiety.

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Toru Doi, Ryuji Sakamoto, Chiaki Horii, Naoki Okamoto, Koji Nakajima, Shima Hirai, Fumihiko Oguchi, So Kato, Yuki Taniguchi, Yoshitaka Matsubayashi, Naoto Hayashi, Sakae Tanaka and Yasushi Oshima

OBJECTIVE

The incidence and risk factors for the progression of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) have been previously reported in surgically and nonsurgically treated symptomatic patients. However, the correlates of OPLL progression in asymptomatic subjects with OPLL are not well characterized. This study aimed to clarify the incidence and risk factors for OPLL progression in asymptomatic subjects based on whole-body CT.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed 2585 healthy subjects who underwent whole-body CT at a single health center from September 2007 to December 2011. This study included asymptomatic subjects with OPLL who underwent CT scans twice with an interval of at least 5 years. Progression of OPLL was assessed based on initial and final CT scan. Subjects were divided into two groups: nonprogression (OPLL-NP) and progression (OPLL-P) groups. Clinical characteristics, bone mineral density status, OPLL types, and OPLL involvement of multiple vertebral levels between the two groups were compared. Risk factors for progression of OPLL were identified by logistic regression analysis after propensity score adjustment.

RESULTS

Of the 109 subjects with OPLL (91 men and 18 women), 20 (18.3%) exhibited OPLL progression (OPLL-P group). Subjects in the OPLL-P group were significantly younger (p = 0.031), had higher prevalence of multilevel OPLL involvement (p = 0.041) and continuous type of OPLL (p = 0.015), and had higher uric acid (UA) levels (p = 0.004) at the time of initial CT examination compared to the OPLL-NP group. Younger age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.95, 95% CI 0.90–0.99), OPLL involvement of multiple vertebral levels (aOR 2.88, 95% CI 1.06–7.83), continuous type of OPLL (aOR 4.21, 95% CI 1.35–13.10), and higher UA levels (aOR 2.09, 95% CI 1.24–3.53) were significant risk factors for OPLL progression.

CONCLUSIONS

Younger age, OPLL involvement of multiple vertebral levels, continuous type of OPLL, and higher UA levels are significant risk factors for OPLL progression in asymptomatic subjects.