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Torstein R. Meling

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Roberto C. Heros

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Pål A. Rønning, Eirik Helseth, Torstein R. Meling and Tom B. Johannesen

OBJECTIVE

The impact of pregnancy on survival in female patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) is unknown and controversial. The authors designed a retrospective cohort study on prospectively collected registry data to assess the influence of pregnancy and child delivery on the survival of female patients with LGG.

METHODS

In Norway, the reporting of all births and cancer diagnoses to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN) and the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN), respectively, is compulsory by law. Furthermore, every individual has a unique 11-digit identification number. The CRN was searched to identify all female patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of World Health Organization (WHO) Grade II astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, or pilocytic astrocytoma who were 16–40 years of age at the time of diagnosis during the period from January 1, 1970, to December 31, 2008. Obstetrical information was obtained from the MBRN for each patient. The effect of pregnancy on survival was evaluated using a Cox model with parity as a time-dependent variable.

RESULTS

The authors identified 65 patients who gave birth to 95 children after an LGG diagnosis. They also identified 281 patients who did not give birth after an LGG diagnosis. The median survival was 14.3 years (95% CI 11.7–20.6 years) for the entire study population. The effect of pregnancy was insignificant in the multivariate model (HR 0.71, 95% CI 0.35–1.42).

CONCLUSIONS

Pregnancy does not seem to have an impact on the survival of female patients with LGG.

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Johan Pallud and Sophie Peeters

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Bernt Filip Hasseleid, Torstein R. Meling, Pål Rønning, David Scheie and Eirik Helseth

Object

Recently the relevance of Simpson resection grade as a prognostic factor for recurrence of WHO Grade I meningiomas was challenged, contradicting many previous scientific reports and traditional neurosurgical teaching. The objective of this study was to determine whether the predictive value of Simpson resection grade is outdated or remains valid with respect to meningioma recurrence and overall survival.

Methods

All patients at least 16 years old who underwent primary craniotomies for convexity meningiomas at Oslo University–affiliated hospitals (Rikshospitalet and Ullevål University Hospitals) in the period between January 1, 1990, and January 27, 2011, were included. Overall survival and retreatment-free survival rates were correlated with patient- and surgery-specific factors.

Results

Three hundred ninety-one consecutive patients were included in the study. The median patient age was 60.1 years (range 19–92 years). The female-to-male ratio was 2.1:1. The WHO grades were Grade I in 353 (90.3%), Grade II in 22 (5.6%), and Grade III in 16 (4.1%). The follow-up rate was 100%. Median follow-up time was 7.1 years (range 0.0–20.9 years) and total observation time was 3147 patient-years. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year overall survival rates were 96%, 89%, and 78%, respectively. Age, sex, WHO grade, and Simpson grade were significantly associated with overall survival. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year retreatment-free survival rates were 99%, 94%, and 90%, respectively. Simpson resection grade and WHO grade were significantly associated with retreatment-free survival. The hazard ratios for retreatment after combined Simpson resection Grades II+III and IV+V were 4.9- and 13.2-times higher than after Simpson Grade I resection, respectively.

Conclusions

Simpson Grade I resection should continue to be the goal for convexity meningiomas.

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Sayied Abdol Mohieb Hosainey, Benjamin Lassen, Eirik Helseth and Torstein R. Meling

Object

The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of CSF disturbances before and after intracranial surgery for pediatric brain tumors in a large, contemporary, single-institution consecutive series.

Methods

All pediatric patients (those < 18 years old), from a well-defined population of 3.0 million inhabitants, who underwent craniotomies for intracranial tumors at Oslo University Hospital in Rikshospitalet between 2000 and 2010 were included. The patients were identified from the authors' prospectively collected database. A thorough review of all medical charts was performed to validate all the database data.

Results

Included in the study were 381 consecutive craniotomies, performed on 302 patients (50.1% male, 49.9% female). The mean age of the patients in the study was 8.63 years (range 0–17.98 years). The follow-up rate was 100%. Primary craniotomies were performed in 282 cases (74%), while 99 cases (26%) were secondary craniotomies. Tumors were located supratentorially in 249 cases (65.3%), in the posterior fossa in 105 (27.6%), and in the brainstem/diencephalon in 27 (7.1%). The surgical approach was supratentorial in 260 cases (68.2%) and infratentorial in 121 (31.8%). Preoperative hydrocephalus was found in 124 cases (32.5%), and 71 (86.6%) of 82 achieved complete cure with tumor resection only. New-onset postoperative hydrocephalus was observed in 9 (3.5%) of 257 cases. The rate of postoperative CSF leaks was 6.3%.

Conclusions

Preoperative hydrocephalus was found in 32.5% of pediatric patients with brain tumors treated using craniotomies. Tumor resection alone cured preoperative hydrocephalus in 86.6% of cases and the incidence of new-onset hydrocephalus after craniotomy was only 3.5%.

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Torstein R. Meling, Angelika Sorteberg, Søren J. Bakke, Haldor Slettebø, Juha Hernesniemi and Wilhelm Sorteberg

Object

The object of this study was to evaluate cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from ruptured blood blister–like aneurysms (BBAs) of the internal carotid artery (ICA) trunk.

Methods

The authors performed a single-center, retrospective study. Data analyzed were patient age, sex, Hunt and Hess grade, Fisher grade, time from SAH to hospitalization, aneurysm size and location, collateral capacity of the circle of Willis, time from hospitalization to aneurysm repair, type of aneurysm repair, complications, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score at follow-up.

Results

A total of 211 patients suffered SAH from ICA aneurysms. Of these, 14 patients (6.6%) had ICA trunk BBAs; 6 men and 8 women. The median age was 47.8 years (range 29.9–67.7 years). The Hunt and Hess grade was IV or V in 7 cases, and SAH was Fisher Grade 3 + 4 in 6. All aneurysms were small (< 1 cm), without relation to vessel bifurcations, and usually located anteromedially on the ICA trunk. Three patients were treated with coil placement and 11 with clip placement. Of the 7 patients in whom the ICA was preserved, only 1 had poor outcome (GOS Score 2). In contrast, cerebral infarcts developed in all patients treated with ICA sacrifice, directly postoperatively in 2 and after delay in 5. Six patients died, 1 survived in poor condition (GOS Score 3; p < 0.001).

Conclusions

Internal carotid BBAs are rare, small, and difficult to treat endovascularly, with only 2 of 14 patients successfully treated with coil placement. The BBAs rupture easily during surgery (ruptured in 6 of 11 surgical cases). Intraoperative aneurysm rupture invariably led to ICA trap ligation. Sacrifice of the ICA within 48 hours of an SAH led to very poor outcome, even in patients with adequate collateral capacity on preoperative angiograms, probably because of vasospasm-induced compromise of the cerebral collaterals.

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Elin Tønne, Bernt J. Due-Tønnessen, Ulrikke Wiig, Barbro F. Stadheim, Torstein R. Meling, Eirik Helseth and Ketil R. Heimdal

OBJECTIVE

The authors present population-based epidemiological data for craniosynostosis regarding incidence, age at diagnosis, sex differences, and frequency of syndromic and familial cases.

METHODS

The prospective registry of the Norwegian National Unit for Craniofacial Surgery was used to retrieve data on all individuals with craniosynostosis treated between 2003 and 2017. The cohort was divided into three 5-year groups based on year of birth: 2003–2007, 2008–2012, and 2013–2017.

RESULTS

The authors identified 386 individuals with craniosynostosis. Of these, 328 (85%) consented to be registered with further information. The incidence increased significantly during the study period and was 5.5 per 10,000 live births (1/1800) in the last 5-year period. The increase was seen almost exclusively in the nonsyndromic group. Syndromic craniosynostosis accounted for 27% of the cases, and the incidence remained stable throughout the three 5-year periods. Both syndromic and nonsyndromic craniosynostosis were highly suture specific. There was a male preponderance (male/female ratio 2:1), and males accounted for 75% of the individuals with midline synostosis. Overall, 9.5% were index individuals in families with more than one affected member; of these, 73% were nonsyndromic cases.

CONCLUSIONS

The incidence of craniosynostosis increased during the study period, and the observed incidence is among the highest reported. The authors attribute this to increasing awareness among healthcare professionals. The number of syndromic cases was high, likely due to a broader definition compared to the majority of earlier reports. The study revealed a high number of familial cases in both syndromic and nonsyndromic craniosynostosis, thus highlighting the importance of genetics as an underlying cause of craniosynostosis.