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Bobby D. Kim, Timothy R. Smith, Seokchun Lim, George R. Cybulski and John Y. S. Kim

Object

Unplanned hospital readmission represents a large financial burden on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, commercial insurance payers, hospitals, and individual patients, and is a principal target for cost reduction. A large-scale, multi-institutional study that evaluates risk factors for readmission has not been previously performed in patients undergoing lumbar decompression procedures. The goal of this multicenter retrospective study was to find preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative predictive factors that result in unplanned readmission (UR) after lumbar decompression surgery.

Methods

The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was retrospectively reviewed to identify all patients who received lumbar decompression procedures in 2011. Risk-adjusted multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to estimate independent predictors of UR.

Results

The overall rate of UR among patients undergoing lumbar decompression was 4.4%. After multivariate logistic regression analysis, anemia (odds ratio [OR] 1.48), dependent functional status (OR 3.03), total operative duration (OR 1.003), and American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Class 4 (OR 3.61) remained as independent predictors of UR. Postoperative complications that were significantly associated with UR included overall complications (OR 5.18), pulmonary embolism (OR 3.72), and unplanned reoperation (OR 56.91).

Conclusions

There were several risk factors for UR after lumbar spine decompression surgery. Identification of high-risk patients and appropriate allocation of resources to reduce postoperative incidence may reduce the readmission rate.

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Timothy Y. Kim, Christopher M. Jackson, Yuanxuan Xia, Leila A. Mashouf, Kisha K. Patel, Eileen S. Kim, Alice L. Hung, Adela Wu, Tomas Garzon-Muvdi, Matthew T. Bender, Chetan Bettegowda, John Y. K. Lee and Michael Lim

OBJECTIVE

Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neuropathic pain disorder characterized by severe, lancinating facial pain that is commonly treated with neuropathic medication, percutaneous rhizotomy, and/or microvascular decompression (MVD). Patients who are not found to have distinct arterial compression during MVD present a management challenge. In 2013, the authors reported on a small case series of such patients in whom glycerin was injected intraoperatively into the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve. The objective of the authors’ present study was to report their updated experience with this technique to further validate this novel approach.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of data obtained in patients in whom glycerin was directly injected into the inferior third of the cisternal portion of the trigeminal nerve. Seventy-four patients, including 14 patients from the authors’ prior study, were identified, and demographic information, intraoperative findings, postoperative course, and complications were recorded. Fisher’s exact test, unpaired t-tests, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves using Mantel log-rank test were used to compare the 74 patients with a cohort of 476 patients who received standard MVD by the same surgeon.

RESULTS

The 74 patients who underwent MVD and glycerin injection had an average follow-up of 19.1 ± 18.0 months, and the male/female ratio was 1:2.9. In 33 patients (44.6%), a previous intervention for TN had failed. On average, patients had an improvement in the Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity score from 4.1 ± 0.4 before surgery to 2.1 ± 1.2 after surgery. Pain improvement after the surgery was documented in 95.9% of patients. Thirteen patients (17.6%) developed burning pain following surgery. Five patients developed complications (6.7%), including incisional infection, facial palsy, CSF leak, and hearing deficit, all of which were minor.

CONCLUSIONS

Intraoperative injection of glycerin into the trigeminal nerve is a generally safe and potentially effective treatment for TN when no distinct site of arterial compression is identified during surgery or when decompression of the nerve is deemed to be inadequate.

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Timothy Wen, Shuhan He, Frank Attenello, Steven Y. Cen, May Kim-Tenser, Peter Adamczyk, Arun P. Amar, Nerses Sanossian and William J. Mack

Object

As health care administrators focus on patient safety and cost-effectiveness, methodical assessment of quality outcome measures is critical. In 2008 the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a series of “never events” that included 11 hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) for which related costs of treatment are not reimbursed. Cerebrovascular procedures (CVPs) are complex and are often performed in patients with significant medical comorbidities.

Methods

This study examines the impact of patient age and medical comorbidities on the occurrence of CMS-defined HACs, as well as the effect of these factors on the length of stay (LOS) and hospitalization charges in patients undergoing common CVPs.

Results

The HACs occurred at a frequency of 0.49% (1.33% in the intracranial procedures and 0.33% in the carotid procedures). Falls/trauma (n = 4610, 72.3% HACs, 357 HACs per 100,000 CVPs) and catheter-associated urinary tract infections (n = 714, 11.2% HACs, 55 HACs per 100,000 CVPs) were the most common events. Age and the presence of ≥ 2 comorbidities were strong independent predictors of HACs (p < 0.0001). The occurrence of HACs negatively impacts both LOS and hospital costs. Patients with at least 1 HAC were 10 times more likely to have prolonged LOS (≥ 90th percentile) (p < 0.0001), and 8 times more likely to have high inpatient costs (≥ 90th percentile) (p < 0.0001) when adjusting for patient and hospital factors.

Conclusions

Improved quality protocols focused on individual patient characteristics might help to decrease the frequency of HACs in this high-risk population. These data suggest that risk adjustment according to underlying patient factors may be warranted when considering reimbursement for costs related to HACs in the setting of CVPs.

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Maya Harary, Aislyn C. DiRisio, Hassan Y. Dawood, John Kim, Nayan Lamba, Charles H. Cho, Timothy R. Smith, Hasan A. Zaidi and Edward R. Laws Jr.

OBJECTIVE

Loss of pituitary function due to nonfunctional pituitary adenoma (NFPA) may be due to compression of the pituitary gland. It has been proposed that the size of the gland and relative perioperative gland expansion may relate to recovery of pituitary function, but the extent of this is unclear. This study aims to assess temporal changes in hormonal function after transsphenoidal resection of NFPA and the relationship between gland reexpansion and endocrine recovery.

METHODS

Patients who underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery by a single surgeon for resection of a nonfunctional macroadenoma were selected for inclusion. Patients with prior pituitary surgery or radiosurgery were excluded. Patient characteristics and endocrine function were extracted by chart review. Volumetric segmentation of the pre- and postoperative (≥ 6 months) pituitary gland was performed using preoperative and long-term postoperative MR images. The relationship between endocrine function over time and clinical attributes, including gland volume, were examined.

RESULTS

One hundred sixty eligible patients were identified, of whom 47.5% were female; 56.9% of patients had anterior pituitary hormone deficits preoperatively. The median tumor diameter and gland volume preoperatively were 22.5 mm (interquartile range [IQR] 18.0–28.8 mm) and 0.18 cm3 (IQR 0.13–0.28 cm3), respectively. In 55% of patients, endocrine function normalized or improved in their affected axes by median last clinical follow-up of 24.4 months (IQR 3.2–51.2 months). Older age, male sex, and larger tumor size were associated with likelihood of endocrine recovery. Median time to recovery of any axis was 12.2 months (IQR 2.5–23.9 months); hypothyroidism was the slowest axis to recover. Although the gland significantly reexpanded from preoperatively (0.18 cm3, IQR 0.13–0.28 cm3) to postoperatively (0.33 cm3, IQR 0.23–0.48 cm3; p < 0.001), there was no consistent association with improved endocrine function.

CONCLUSIONS

Recovery of endocrine function can occur several months and even years after surgery, with more than 50% of patients showing improved or normalized function. Tumor size, and not gland volume, was associated with preserved or recovered endocrine function.