Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for

  • Author or Editor: Tim E. Darsaut x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Tim E. Darsaut, Giuseppe Lanzino, M. Beatriz Lopes and Steven Newman

The term “orbital tumors” comprises a wide variety of lesions that often share the same cardinal clinical finding (exophthalmos) and clinical history. Age at presentation, associated ophthalmological findings, and radiological features, however, provide invaluable information as to the possible histological type of tumor. The present article serves as an introductory overview regarding the pathological characteristics, clinical features, radiological characteristics, and principles of treatment of orbital tumors.

Free access

Mohamed Samy Elhammady and Roberto C. Heros

Free access

Tim E. Darsaut and Jean Raymond

Restricted access

David F. Kallmes, Waleed Brinjikji and Alejandro A. Rabinstein

Restricted access

Tim E. Darsaut and Jean Raymond

Restricted access

Ignacio Arrese and Rosario Sarabia

Restricted access

Robert Fahed, Tim E. Darsaut, Igor Salazkin, Guylaine Gevry and Jean Raymond

OBJECTIVE

The Medina embolization device (MED) is a novel, braided self-expanding endovascular device designed to occlude aneurysms by constructing an in situ intrasaccular flow diverter. Although a single device can be positioned at the neck of simple spherical in vitro aneurysms, the best way to occlude more complex in vivo aneurysms (using multiple MEDs or a combination of MEDs and platinum coils) is currently unknown.

METHODS

Fifty-two aneurysms of 3 different types were created in 31 canines, yielding 48 patent aneurysms. Treatments were randomly allocated by drawing lots: group 1, MEDs alone (n = 16); group 2, MEDs plus standard platinum coils (n = 16); and group 3, control aneurysms treated with coils alone (n = 16). Angiographic results were scored and compared immediately following treatment completion and at 3 months. Specimens were photographed and the extent of neointimal closure of the aneurysmal neck scored, followed by histopathological analyses.

RESULTS

Angiographic scores of 0 or 1 (occlusion or near occlusion) were initially obtained in 2 of 16 (12.5%, 95% CI 1.6%–38.3%) group 1 (MEDs alone), 3 of 16 (18.7%, 95% CI 4%–45.6%) group 2 (MEDs plus coils), and 10 of 16 (62.5%, 95% CI 35.4%–84.8%) group 3 (coils alone) aneurysms (p = 0.005). At 3 months, scores of 0 or 1 were found in 11 of 16 (68.7%, 95% CI 41.3%–89.0%) group 1, 9 of 16 (56.2%, 95% CI 29.9%–80.2%) group 2, and 8 of 16 (50%, 95% CI 24.7%–75.3%) group 3 aneurysms (p = 0.82). Neointimal scores were similar for the 3 treated groups (p = 0.66).

CONCLUSION

Endovascular treatment of experimental aneurysms with MEDs or MEDs and coils showed angiographic occlusion and neointimal scores at 3 months that were similar to those achieved with standard platinum coiling.

Restricted access

Peter S. Amenta, Ricky Medel and Aaron S. Dumont

Full access

Tim E. Darsaut, Igor Salazkin, Jean-Christophe Gentric, Elsa Magro, Guylaine Gevry, Michel W. Bojanowski and Jean Raymond

OBJECTIVE

Surgical management of recurrent aneurysms following failed flow diversion may pose difficulties in securing vascular control with temporary clips. The authors tested the efficacy and impact of different types of aneurysm clips on flow-diverted arteries.

METHODS

Six wide-necked experimental aneurysms were created in canines and treated with Pipeline flow diverters. In 4 aneurysms, occlusion of the artery at the level of the proximal and distal landing zones (n = 2 per aneurysm) was attempted, using temporary, fenestrated, single, and double permanent aneurysm clips. Two aneurysms served as unclipped controls. Serial angiography was performed to investigate the efficacy of clip occlusion, flow diverter deformation, and thrombus formation. After the animals were killed, the flow-diverted aneurysm constructs were opened and photographed to determine neointimal or device damage as a result of clip placement.

RESULTS

Angiography-confirmed clip occlusion was only possible for 4 of 8 of the tested flow-diverted arterial segments. Clip application attempts led to filling defects consistent with thrombus formation in 2 of 4 flow-diverted constructs, and to minor damage of the flow diverter with neointimal fracture in 1 of 4 cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Aneurysm clips placed on canine parent arteries bearing a Pipeline flow diverter were unable to reliably stop blood flow. Application of aneurysm clips can cause mild damage to the device and neointima, which might translate into thromboembolic risks. If possible, vascular control should be sought beyond the terminal ends of the implanted device.

Free access

Elsa Magro, Jean-Christophe Gentric, Tim E. Darsaut, Daniela Ziegler, MSI, Michel W. Bojanowski and Jean Raymond

OBJECTIVE

The ARUBA study (A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain Arteriovenous Malformations [AVMs]) on unruptured brain AVMs has been the object of comments and editorials. In the present study the authors aim to systematically review critiques, discuss design issues, and propose a framework for future trials.

METHODS

The authors performed a systematic review of the French and English literature on the ARUBA study published between January 2006 and February 2015. The electronic search, including the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (PubMed and Ovid), CINAHL, and EMBASE databases, was complemented by hand searching and cross-referencing. The comments were categorized as items related to the design, the conduct, and the analysis and interpretation of the trial.

RESULTS

Thirty-one articles or letters were identified. The pragmatic design, with heterogeneity of patients and lack of standardization of the treatment arm, were frequently stated concerns. The choice of outcome measures was repeatedly criticized. During the trial, low enrollment rates, selection bias, and premature interruption of enrollment were frequent comments. The short follow-up period, the lack of subgroup analyses, the lack of details on the results of the various treatments, and a contentious interpretation of results were noted at the analysis stage. A fundamental problem was the primary hypothesis testing conservative management. The authors believe that other trials are needed. Future trials could be pragmatic, test interventions stratified at the time of randomization, and look for long-term, hard clinical outcomes in a large number of patients.

CONCLUSIONS

In the authors' view, the ARUBA trial is a turning point in the history of brain AVM management; future trials should aim at integrating trial methodology and clinical care in the presence of uncertainty.