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Wei Xu, Yu Wang, Jing Wang, Xinghai Yang, Weibo Liu, Wang Zhou, Tielong Liu and Jianru Xiao

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term bisphosphonate treatment on reducing local recurrence of sacral giant cell tumors (GCTs) after nerve-sparing surgery.

METHODS

Thirty-five consecutive patients with sacral GCTs who received treatment in Shanghai Changzheng Hospital between January 2000 and December 2010 were included in this study. Between January 2007 and December 2010, 19 patients received bisphosphonates following nerve-sparing surgery. Before January 2007, 16 patients received nerve-sparing surgery alone, and these cases were included as the control group. The difference in clinical data between the groups was compared by Student's t-test and 2-tailed chi-square or Fisher's exact test. The postoperative recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared between the groups by log-rank test. A p value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.

RESULTS

All of the patients had relatively good nerve function. The clinical data were homogeneous between the groups. The local recurrence rate was 10.53% (2 of 19) in the bisphosphonate treatment group and 43.75% (7 of 16) in the control group. The log-rank test showed that the 3-year RFS and 3-year OS in the bisphosphonate treatment group were significantly higher than those in the control group (RFS 89.5% vs 56.3%, p = 0.04; OS 100% vs 81.3%, p = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

The long-term use of bisphosphonates after nerve-sparing surgery is a viable option for the treatment of sacral GCTs. This approach could reduce local recurrences while preserving nerve function.

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Qi Jia, Xin Gao, Zhenhua Zhou, Bin Lan, Jian Zhao, Tielong Liu, Xinghai Yang, Haifeng Wei and Jianru Xiao

OBJECTIVE

Spinal instability or neurological impairment caused by spinal brown tumors (BTs) with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is an acute condition that needs urgent surgery. There is not much published information on BTs of the mobile spine given the rarity of the disease, and the literature shows inconsistent treatment options and ambiguous follow-up information. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the clinical features, anesthesia management, and surgical treatment for this rare disease through long-term follow-up observations.

METHODS

Clinical, laboratory, radiological, and perioperative data on 6 consecutive patients with spinal BTs who had been admitted to the authors’ institution between 2010 and 2016 were retrospectively reviewed. The literature on spinal BT with secondary hyperparathyroidism was also reviewed. Summaries of the clinical features and anesthesia management are provided.

RESULTS

The mean age of the 6 patients was 45.5 years (range 35–62 years). Lesions were located in the cervical segment (2 cases) and thoracic segment (4 cases). Localized pain was the most common complaint, and pathological fracture occurred in 5 patients. Elevation of serum alkaline phosphate (AKP) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) was a common phenomenon. Four patients underwent circumferential resection and 2 underwent laminectomy, with parathyroidectomy performed in all patients. The anesthesia process was uneventful for all patients. The mean follow-up was 33 months (range 26–40 months). No spinal lesion progression occurred in any patient. The Karnofsky Performance Status score improved to 80–90 by 3 months after surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

Although uncommon, spinal BTs should be a diagnostic consideration in patients with ESRD. The thoracic spine is the most frequently affected site. ESRD is not a contraindication for surgery; with the assistance of experienced anesthesiologists, urgent surgery is the preferred option to alleviate neurological impairment and restore spinal stability.