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Erratum

Brain penetration effects of microelectrodes and deep brain stimulation leads in ventral intermediate nucleus stimulation for essential tremor

Takashi Morishita

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Koichi Miki, Hiroshi Abe, Takashi Morishita, Shuji Hayashi, Kenji Yagi, Hisatomi Arima and Tooru Inoue

OBJECTIVE

Subdural hygroma has been reported as a causative factor in the development of a chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) following a head trauma and/or neurosurgical procedure. In some CSDH cases, the presence of a 2-layered space delineated by the same or similar density of CSF surrounded by a superficial, residual hematoma is seen on CT imaging after evacuation of the hematoma. The aims of the present study were to test the hypothesis that the double-crescent sign (DCS), a unique imaging finding described here, is associated with the postoperative recurrence of CSDH, and to investigate other factors that are related to CSDH recurrence.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed data from 278 consecutive patients who underwent single burr-hole surgery for CSDH between April 2012 and March 2017. The DCS was defined as a postoperative CT finding, characterized by the following 2 layers: a superficial layer demonstrating residual hematoma after evacuation of the CSDH, and a deep layer between the brain’s surface and the residual hematoma, depicted as a low-density space. Correlation of the recurrence of CSDH with the DCS was evaluated by multivariate logistic regression modeling. The authors also investigated other classic predictive factors including age, sex, past history of head injury, hematoma laterality, anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy administration, preoperative hematoma volume, postoperative residual hematoma volume, and postoperative brain reexpansion rate.

RESULTS

A total of 277 patients (320 hemispheres) were reviewed. Fifty (18.1%) of the 277 patients experienced recurrence of CSDH within 3 months of surgery. CSDH recurred within 3 months of surgery in 32 of the 104 hemispheres with a positive DCS. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed that the presence of the DCS (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.72–6.57, p < 0.001), large postoperative residual hematoma volume (OR 2.88, 95% CI 1.24–6.71, p = 0.014), anticoagulant therapy (OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.02–9.01, p = 0.046), and bilateral hematoma (OR 3.57, 95% CI 1.79–7.13, p < 0.001) were significant, independent predictors of CSDH recurrence.

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, the authors report that detection of the DCS within 7 days of surgery is an independent predictive factor for CSDH recurrence. They therefore advocate that clinicians should carefully monitor patients for postoperative DCS and subsequent CSDH recurrence.

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Koichi Miki, Kenji Yagi, Masani Nonaka, Mitsutoshi Iwaasa, Hiroshi Abe, Takashi Morishita, Hisatomi Arima and Tooru Inoue

OBJECTIVE

In patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH), postoperative recurrent hemorrhage (PRH) is one of the most severe complications after endoscopic evacuation of hematoma (EEH). However, no predictors of this complication have been identified. In the present study, the authors retrospectively investigated whether PRH can be preoperatively predicted by the presence of the spot sign on CT scans.

METHODS

In total, 143 patients with sICH were treated by EEH between June 2009 and March 2017, and 127 patients who underwent preoperative CT angiography were included in this study. Significant correlations of PRH with the patients’ baseline, clinical, and radiographic characteristics, including the spot sign, were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models.

RESULTS

The incidence of and risk factors for PRH were assessed in 127 patients with available data. PRH occurred in 9 (7.1%) patients. Five (21.7%) cases of PRH were observed among 23 patients with the spot sign, whereas only 4 (3.8%) cases of PRH occurred among 104 patients without the spot sign. The spot sign was the only independent predictor of PRH (OR 5.81, 95% CI 1.26–26.88; p = 0.02). The following factors were not independently associated with PRH: age, hypertension, poor consciousness, antihemostatic factors (thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and use of antithrombotic drugs), the location and size of the sICH, other radiographic findings (black hole sign and blend sign), surgical duration and procedures, and early surgery.

CONCLUSIONS

The spot sign is likely to be a strong predictor of PRH after EEH among patients with sICH. Complete and careful control of bleeding in the operative field should be ensured when surgically treating such patients. New surgical strategies and procedures might be needed to improve these patients’ outcomes.

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Hideki Oshima, Yoichi Katayama, Takashi Morishita, Koichiro Sumi, Toshiharu Otaka, Kazutaka Kobayashi, Yutaka Suzuki, Chikashi Fukaya and Takamitsu Yamamoto

Object

The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chronic subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation for alleviating pain related to Parkinson disease (PD).

Methods

Among 163 consecutive patients undergoing STN stimulation, 69 were identified as experiencing pain preoperatively that was related to their PD. All 69 patients suffering from pain were followed up prospectively for 12 months after surgery. All patients described the severity of their pain according to a visual analog scale (VAS) preoperatively and at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Pain unrelated to PD was not studied.

Results

Several types of pain related to PD, the categories of which were based on a modification of 2 previous classifications (Ford and Honey), can occur in such patients: 1) musculoskeletal pain, 2) dystonic pain, 3) somatic pain exacerbated by PD, 4) radicular/peripheral neuropathic pain, and 5) central pain. The overall mean VAS score was significantly decreased postoperatively by 75% and 69% at 2 weeks and 6 months, respectively (p < 0.001). The mean VAS score at 12 months was also decreased by 80%, but 6 instances of pain (3 reports of somatic back pain and 3 reports of radicular/peripheral neuropathic pain) required additional spinal surgery to alleviate the pain severity. The results were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and demonstrated a significant reduction in VAS scores at all follow-up assessments (p < 0.001). Musculoskeletal pain and dystonic pain were well alleviated by STN stimulation. In contrast, somatic pain exacerbated by PD and peripheral neuropathic pain originating from lumbar spinal diseases, such as spondylosis deformans and/or canal stenosis, often deteriorated postoperatively despite attenuation of the patients' motor disability. Patients with central pain were poor responders.

Conclusions

This study found that STN stimulation produced significant improvement of overall pain related to PD in patients with advanced PD, and the efficacy continued for at least 1 year. The present results indicate that musculoskeletal pain and dystonic pain responded well to STN stimulation, but patients with back pain (somatic pain) and radicular/peripheral neuropathic pain originating from spinal disease have a potential risk for postoperative deterioration of their pain.

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Takashi Morishita, Yoshio Tsuboi, Masa-aki Higuchi and Tooru Inoue

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Takashi Morishita, Kelly D. Foote, Samuel S. Wu, Charles E. Jacobson IV, Ramon L. Rodriguez, Ihtsham U. Haq, Mustafa S. Siddiqui, Irene A. Malaty, Christopher J. Hass and Michael S. Okun

Object

Microelectrode recording (MER) and macrostimulation (test stimulation) are used to refine the optimal deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead placement within the operative setting. It is well known that there can be a microlesion effect with microelectrode trajectories and DBS insertion. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of intraoperative MER and lead placement on tremor severity in a cohort of patients with essential tremor.

Methods

Consecutive patients with essential tremor undergoing unilateral DBS (ventral intermediate nucleus stimulation) for medication-refractory tremor were evaluated. Tremor severity was measured at 5 time points utilizing a modified Tremor Rating Scale: 1) immediately before MER; 2) immediately after MER; 3) immediately after lead implantation; 4) 6 months after DBS implantation in the off-DBS condition; and 5) 6 months after implantation in the on-DBS condition. To investigate the impact of the MER and DBS lead placement, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were applied to test changes in tremor severity scores over the surgical course. In addition, a generalized linear mixed model including factors that potentially influenced the impact of the microlesion was also used for analysis.

Results

Nineteen patients were evaluated. Improvement was noted in the total modified Tremor Rating Scale, postural, and action tremor scores (p < 0.05) as a result of MER and DBS lead placement. The improvements observed following lead placement were similar in magnitude to what was observed in the chronically programmed clinic setting parameters at 6 months after lead implantation. Improvement in tremor severity was maintained over time even in the off-DBS condition at 6 months, which was supportive of a prolonged microlesion effect. The number of macrostimulation passes, the number of MER passes, and disease duration were not related to the change in tremor severity score over time.

Conclusions

Immediate improvement in postural and intention tremors may result from MER and DBS lead placement in patients undergoing DBS for essential tremor. This improvement could be a predictor of successful DBS lead placement at 6 months. Clinicians rating patients in the operating room should be aware of these effects and should consider using rating scales before and after lead placement to take these effects into account when evaluating outcome in and out of the operating room.