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Kunihiko Sasai, Masayuki Umeda, Takanori Saito, Hiroyuki Ohnari, Ei Wakabayashi and Hirokazu Iida

Object

The authors retrospectively investigated the surgical outcomes and radiographically documented changes after microsurgical posterior foraminotomy with en bloc laminoplasty in patients with cervical spondylotic radiculo-myelopathy (CSRM), including cervical spondylotic amyotrophy (CSA), during a period greater than 2 years.

Methods

Thirty-four consecutive patients (24 men and 10 women) were included in this study. Twenty patients had preoperative radicular pain, and CSA was diagnosed in 14 patients. The mean age at the time of surgery was 61 years (range 43–77 years). The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 6.5 years (mean 3.4 years). Foraminotomy was performed at 49 sites. Neurological improvement was evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system; radicular pain and deltoid muscle strength were also evaluated clinically. Cervical lordosis, flexion–extension angles, range of motion (ROM), and the angulation and the extent of vertebral slippage at the affected nerve root levels were measured preoperatively and at last follow-up examination.

The mean rate of JOA score improvement was 67.2% (range 22.2–100%). In all 20 patients, preoperative radicular pain completely resolved after surgery. In all 14 patients with CSA, deltoid muscle strength improved; in approximately 80% of these patients, there was either no muscle weakness or only slight weakness. The flexion angles and ROM significantly decreased at the time of the last follow-up examination (p = 0.0402 and 0.0196, respectively). No other items changed significantly.

Conclusions

The aforementioned surgical procedure was safely completed and the surgical outcomes were satisfactory for CSRM including CSA. The instability (the angulation and the vertebral slippage) did not significantly change after surgery. This procedure yielded outstanding results and should be considered an option for cervical laminoplasty in the future.

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Hidetoshi Matsukawa, Hiroyasu Kamiyama, Yu Kinoshita, Norihiro Saito, Yuto Hatano, Takanori Miyazaki, Nakao Ota, Kosumo Noda, Takaharu Shonai, Osamu Takahashi, Sadahisa Tokuda and Rokuya Tanikawa

OBJECTIVE

It is well known that larger aneurysm size is a risk factor for poor outcome after surgical treatment of unruptured saccular intracranial aneurysms (USIAs). However, the authors have occasionally observed poor outcome in the surgical treatment of small USIAs and hypothesized that size ratio has a negative impact on outcome. The aim of this paper was to investigate the influence of size ratio on outcome in the surgical treatment of USIAs.

METHODS

Prospectively collected clinical and radiological data of 683 consecutive patients harboring 683 surgically treated USIAs were evaluated. Dome-to-neck ratio was defined as the ratio of the maximum width of the aneurysm to the average neck diameter. The aspect ratio was defined as the ratio of the maximum perpendicular height of the aneurysm to the average neck diameter of the aneurysm. The size ratio was calculated by dividing the maximum aneurysm diameter (height or width, mm) by the average parent artery diameter (mm). Neurological worsening was defined as an increase in modified Rankin Scale score of 1 or more points at 12 months. Clinical and radiological variables were compared between patients with and without neurological worsening.

RESULTS

The median patient age was 64 years (IQR 56–71 years), and 528 (77%) patients were female. The median maximum size, dome-to-neck ratio, aspect ratio, and size ratio were 4.7 mm (IQR 3.6–6.7 mm), 1.2 (IQR 1.0–1.4), 1.0 (IQR 0.76–1.3), and 1.9 (IQR 1.4–2.8), respectively. The size ratio was significantly correlated with maximum size (r = 0.83, p < 0.0001), dome-to-neck ratio (r = 0.69, p < 0.0001), and aspect ratio (r = 0.74, p < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the specific USIA location (paraclinoid segment of the internal carotid artery: OR 6.2, 95% CI 2.6–15, p < 0.0001; and basilar artery: OR 8.4, 95% CI 2.8–25, p < 0.0001), size ratio (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.6, p = 0.021), and postoperative ischemic lesion (OR 9.4, 95% CI 4.4–19, p < 0.0001) were associated with neurological worsening (n = 52, 7.6%), and other characteristics showed no significant differences.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study showed that size ratio, and not other morphological parameters, was a risk factor for 12-month neurological worsening in surgically treated patients with USIAs. The size ratio should be further studied in a large, prospective observational cohort to predict neurological worsening in the surgical treatment of USIAs.

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Sho Kobayashi, Yukihiro Matsuyama, Kenichi Shinomiya, Shigenori Kawabata, Muneharu Ando, Tsukasa Kanchiku, Takanori Saito, Masahito Takahashi, Zenya Ito, Akio Muramoto, Yasushi Fujiwara, Kazunobu Kida, Kei Yamada, Kanichiro Wada, Naoya Yamamoto, Kazuhiko Satomi and Toshikazu Tani

Object

Although multimodal intraoperative spinal cord monitoring provides greater accuracy, transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potential (TcMEP) monitoring became the gold standard for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring. However, there is no definite alarm point for TcMEPs because a multicenter study is lacking. Thus, based on their experience with 48 true-positive cases (that is, a decrease in potentials followed by a new neurological motor deficit postoperatively) encountered between 2007 and 2009, the authors set a 70% decrease in amplitude as the alarm point for TcMEPs.

Methods

A total of 959 cases of spinal deformity, spinal cord tumor, and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) treated between 2010 and 2012 are included in this prospective multicenter study (18 institutions). These institutions are part of the Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research monitoring working group and the study group on spinal ligament ossification. The authors prospectively analyzed TcMEP variability and pre- and postoperative motor deficits. A 70% decrease in amplitude was designated as the alarm point.

Results

There were only 2 false-negative cases, which occurred during surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors. This new alarm criterion provided high sensitivity (95%) and specificity (91%) for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring and favorable accuracy, except in cases of intramedullary spinal cord tumor.

Conclusions

This study is the first prospective multicenter study to investigate the alarm point of TcMEPs. The authors recommend the designation of an alarm point of a 70% decrease in amplitude for routine spinal cord monitoring, particularly during surgery for spinal deformity, OPLL, and extramedullary spinal cord tumor.

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Hidetoshi Matsukawa, Hiroyasu Kamiyama, Toshiyuki Tsuboi, Kosumo Noda, Nakao Ota, Shiro Miyata, Takanori Miyazaki, Yu Kinoshita, Norihiro Saito, Osamu Takahashi, Rihee Takeda, Sadahisa Tokuda and Rokuya Tanikawa

OBJECTIVE

Only a few previous studies have investigated subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after surgical treatment in patients with unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs). Given the improvement in long-term outcomes of embolization, more extensive data are needed concerning the true rupture rates after microsurgery in order to provide reliable information for treatment decisions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for postoperative SAH in patients with surgically treated UIAs.

METHODS

Data from 702 consecutive patients harboring 852 surgically treated UIAs were evaluated. Surgical treatments included neck clipping (complete or incomplete), coating/wrapping, trapping, proximal occlusion, and bypass surgery. Clippable UIAs were defined as UIAs treated by complete neck clipping. The annual incidence of postoperative SAH and risk factors for SAH were studied using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models.

RESULTS

The patients’ median age was 64 years (interquartile range [IQR] 56–71 years). Of 852 UIAs, 767 were clippable and 85 were not. The mean duration of follow-up was 731 days (SD 380 days). During 1708 aneurysm years, there were 4 episodes of SAH, giving an overall average annual incidence rate of 0.23% (95% CI 0.12%–0.59%) and an average annual incidence rate of 0.065% (95% CI 0.0017%–0.37%) for clippable UIAs (1 episode of SAH, 1552 aneurysm-years). Basilar artery location (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 23, 95% CI 2.0–255, p = 0.0012) and unclippable UIA status (adjusted HR 15, 95% CI 1.1–215, p = 0.046) were significantly related to postoperative SAH. An excellent outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1) was achieved in 816 (95.7%) of 852 cases overall and in 748 (98%) of 767 clippable UIAs at 12 months.

CONCLUSIONS

In this large case series, microsurgical treatment of UIAs was found to be safe and effective. Aneurysm location and unclippable morphologies were related to postoperative SAH in patients with surgically treated UIAs.