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Tadashi Nariai, Joseph J. DeGeorge, Nigel H. Greig, and Stanley I. Rapoport

✓ Lipid metabolism of an intracerebrally implanted brain tumor and normal brain was investigated in awake Fischer 344 rats using intravenously injected [9, 10-3H]-palmitate as a probe. A suspension of Walker 256 carcinosarcoma cells (250 cells in 5 µl medium), with or without 1 % low-melting-point agar, was implanted into the caudate nucleus of rats 8 to 9 weeks old. Control animals received an intracerebral injection without tumor cells. Seven days after implantation, awake rats were infused intravenously for 5 minutes with [9, 10-3H]-palmitate (6.4 mCi/kg). The rats were killed 20 minutes after initiation of the infusion and coronal brain slices were obtained for quantitative autoradiography and light histological study. Tumor cell masses were histologically well demarcated from the surrounding brain tissue. Tumor tissue incorporation of [9, 10-3H]- palmitate was heterogeneous, ranging on average from 3.1- to 6.1-fold greater than in the corresponding contralateral brain. In addition, incorporation corresponded to regional tumor cell density. The incorporation rate constant of [9, 10-3H]-palmitate in tumor was significantly increased compared to control brain and was independent of tumor size. Necrotic areas within tumors showed no incorporation of radiolabeled palmitate. Brain surrounding the tumors and control injection sites showed reactive gliosis, and possessed 30% greater incorporation of [9, 10-3H]-palmitate than contralateral normal brain. These results suggest that [9, 10-3H]- palmitate can be used to image brain tumors in vivo, measuring turnover and/or synthesis of tumor and brain lipid.

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Maki Mukawa, Tadashi Nariai, Yoshiharu Matsushima, and Kikuo Ohno

Object

The authors compared the clinical features between familial and sporadic cases of moyamoya disease (MMD) by retrospectively analyzing data on patients with MMD registered in the database of Tokyo Medical and Dental University over a period of 28 years.

Methods

In total, 383 patients with hospital records at Tokyo Medical and Dental University from 1980 to 2007 were registered into the database. The data on all of these patients were retrospectively reviewed to clarify the occurrence of familial cases. Clinical features of child or adolescent patients (< 20 years of age) with MMD were compared between familial and sporadic cases in a subgroup of patients who were registered after 1995, initially diagnosed using MR angiography, and assessed using an intelligence scale.

Results

Familial occurrence was observed in 59 patients (15.4%) in 40 pedigrees. The clinical features of juvenile patients were analyzed in 124 patients, 22 (17.7%) of whom had familial histories. In comparison with the sporadic cases, patients with familial histories were significantly younger at onset (4.7 vs 6.6 years old), had significantly more cortical infarction (59.1% vs 25.5%), and had significantly more stenoocclusive lesions in the posterior cerebral artery (45.4% vs 24.5%). The rate of patients with intellectual disturbance (intelligence quotient < 75) was significantly larger in the familial cases (47.4%) than in the sporadic cases (17.8%).

Conclusions

This survey of the clinical features of familial MMD suggests that patients with familial MMD had a more serious clinical course in childhood than the sporadic MMD cases.

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Masaaki Yamamoto, Takuya Kawabe, Yasunori Sato, Yoshinori Higuchi, Tadashi Nariai, Shinya Watanabe, and Hidetoshi Kasuya

Object

Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone is not a standard treatment for patients with 4–5 tumors or more, a recent trend has been for patients with 5 or more, or even 10 or more, tumors to undergo SRS alone. The aim of this study was to reappraise whether the treatment results for SRS alone for patients with 10 or more tumors differ from those for patients with 2–9 tumors.

Methods

This was an institutional review board–approved, retrospective cohort study that gathered data from the Katsuta Hospital Mito GammaHouse prospectively accumulated database. Data were collected for 2553 patients who consecutively had undergone Gamma Knife SRS alone, without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), for newly diagnosed (mostly) or recurrent (uncommonly) brain metastases during 1998–2011. Of these 2553 patients, 739 (28.9%) with a single tumor were excluded, leaving 1814 with multiple metastases in the study. These 1814 patients were divided into 2 groups: those with 2–9 tumors (Group A, 1254 patients) and those with 10 or more tumors (Group B, 560 patients). Because of considerable bias in pre-SRS clinical factors between groups A and B, a case-matched study, which used the propensity score matching method, was conducted for clinical factors (i.e., age, sex, primary tumor state, extracerebral metastases, Karnofsky Performance Status, neurological symptoms, prior procedures [surgery and WBRT], volume of the largest tumor, and peripheral doses). Ultimately, 720 patients (360 in each group) were selected. The standard Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine post-SRS survival times and post-SRS neurological death–free survival times. Competing risk analysis was applied to estimate cumulative incidence for local recurrence, repeat SRS for new lesions, neurological deterioration, and SRS-induced complications.

Results

Post-SRS median survival times did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (6.8 months for Group A vs 6.0 months for Group B; hazard ratio [HR] 1.133, 95% CI 0.974–1.319, p = 0.10). Furthermore, rates of neurological death were very similar: 10.0% for group A and 9.4% for group B (p = 0.89); neurological death–free survival times did not differ significantly between the 2 groups (HR 1.073, 95% CI 0.649–1.771, p = 0.78). The cumulative incidence of local recurrence (HR 0.425, 95% CI 0.0.181–0.990, p = 0.04) and repeat SRS for new lesions (HR 0.732, 95% CI 0.554–0.870, p = 0.03) were significantly lower for Group B than for Group A patients. No significant differences between the groups were found for cumulative incidence for neurological deterioration (HR 0.994, 95% CI 0.607–1.469, p = 0.80) or SRS-related complications (HR 0.541, 95% CI 0.138–2.112, p = 0.38).

Conclusions

Post-SRS treatment results (i.e., median survival time; neurological death–free survival times; and cumulative incidence for local recurrence, repeat SRS for new lesions, neurological deterioration, and SRS-related complications) were not inferior (neither less effective nor less safe) for patients in Group B than for those in Group A. We conclude that carefully selected patients with 10 or more tumors are not unfavorable candidates for SRS alone. A randomized controlled trial should be conducted to test this hypothesis.

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Masaaki Yamamoto, Takuya Kawabe, Yasunori Sato, Yoshinori Higuchi, Tadashi Nariai, Bierta E. Barfod, Hidetoshi Kasuya, and Yoichi Urakawa

Object

Although stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone for patients with 4–5 or more tumors is not a standard treatment, a trend for patients with 5 or more tumors to undergo SRS alone is already apparent. The authors' aim in the present study was to reappraise whether SRS results for ≥ 5 tumors differ from those for 1–4 tumors.

Methods

This institutional review board–approved retrospective cohort study used the authors' database of prospectively accumulated data that included 2553 consecutive patients who underwent SRS, not in combination with concurrent whole-brain radiotherapy, for brain metastases (METs) between 1998 and 2011. These 2553 patients were divided into 2 groups: 1553 with tumor numbers of 1–4 (Group A) and 1000 with ≥ 5 tumors (Group B). Because there was considerable bias in pre-SRS clinical factors between Groups A and B, a case-matched study was conducted. Ultimately, 1096 patients (548 each in Groups A and B) were selected. The standard Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine post-SRS survival and the post-SRS neurological death–free survival times. Competing risk analysis was applied to estimate cumulative incidences of local recurrence, repeat SRS for new lesions, neurological deterioration, and SRS-induced complications.

Results

The post-SRS median survival time was significantly longer in the 548 Group A patients (7.9 months, 95% CI 7.0–8.9 months) than in the 548 Group B patients (7.0 months 95% [CI 6.2–7.8 months], HR 1.176 [95% CI 1.039–1.331], p = 0.01). However, incidences of neurological death were very similar: 10.6% in Group A and 8.2% in Group B (p = 0.21). There was no significant difference between the groups in neurological death–free survival intervals (HR 0.945, 95% CI 0.636–1.394, p = 0.77). Furthermore, competing risk analyses showed that there were no significant differences between the groups in cumulative incidences of local recurrence (HR 0.577, 95% CI 0.312–1.069, p = 0.08), repeat SRS (HR 1.133, 95% CI 0.910–1.409, p = 0.26), neurological deterioration (HR 1.868, 95% CI 0.608–1.240, p = 0.44), and major SRS-related complications (HR 1.105, 95% CI 0.490–2.496, p = 0.81).

In the authors' cohort, age ≤ 65 years, female sex, a Karnofsky Performance Scale score ≥ 80%, cumulative tumor volume ≤ 10 cm3, controlled primary cancer, no extracerebral METs, and neurologically asymptomatic status were significant factors favoring longer survival equally in both groups.

Conclusions

This retrospective study suggests that increased tumor number is an unfavorable factor for longer survival. However, the post-SRS median survival time difference, 0.9 months, between the two groups is not clinically meaningful. Furthermore, patients with 5 or more METs have noninferior results compared to patients with 1–4 tumors, in terms of neurological death, local recurrence, repeat SRS, maintenance of good neurological state, and SRS-related complications. A randomized controlled trial should be conducted to test this hypothesis.

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Kaoru Tamura, Masaru Aoyagi, Hiroaki Wakimoto, Noboru Ando, Tadashi Nariai, Masaaki Yamamoto, and Kikuo Ohno

Object

Recent evidence suggests that a glioma stem cell subpopulation might contribute to radioresistance in malignant gliomas. To investigate this hypothesis, the authors examined recurrent malignant gliomas for histopathological changes after high-dose irradiation with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT).

Methods

Thirty-two patients with malignant gliomas (Grade 3 in 8 patients, Grade 4 in 24) underwent GKS in combination with EBRT. Serial MR and L-[methyl-11C] methionine PET images were employed to assess remnant or recurrent tumors after GKS. Twelve patients underwent surgical removal after GKS and EBRT. Histological sections were subjected to immunohistochemistry for MIB-1, factor VIII, and stem cell markers, nestin and CD133.

Results

The site of GKS treatment failure was local in 16 (76.2%) of 21 patients with glioblastomas showing progression; in 9 of these 16 patients, the recurrence clearly arose within the target lesion of GKS. Histopathological examination after GKS and EBRT showed variable mixtures of viable tumor tissues and necrosis. Viable tumor tissues exhibited high MIB-1 indices but reduced numbers of tumor blood vessels. There was marked accumulation of CD133-positive glioma cells, particularly in remnant tumors within the necrotic areas, in sections obtained after GKS plus EBRT, whereas CD133-positive cells appeared very infrequently in primary sections prior to adjuvant treatment.

Conclusions

The results indicate that CD133-positive glioma stemlike cells can survive high-dose irradiation, leading to recurrence, despite prolonged damage to tumor blood vessels. This could be an essential factor limiting the effectiveness of GKS plus EBRT for malignant gliomas.

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Maki Mukawa, Tadashi Nariai, Motoki Inaji, Natsumi Tamada, Taketoshi Maehara, Yoshiharu Matsushima, Kikuo Ohno, Mariko Negi, and Daisuke Kobayashi

The object of this study was to analyze the pathology of collateral vessels newly induced by indirect bypass surgery for moyamoya disease (MMD). An autopsy analysis was conducted on a 39-year-old woman with MMD who had died of a brainstem infarction. The patient had undergone bilateral indirect bypass surgeries 22 years earlier. Sufficient revascularization via bilateral external carotid arterial systems was confirmed by cerebral angiography before her death. Macroscopic observation of the operative areas revealed countless meandering vessels on the internal surface of the dura mater connected with small vessels on the brain surface and in the subpial brain tissue. Notably, microscopic analysis of these vessels revealed the characteristic 3-layer structure of an arterial wall. This autopsy analysis was the first to confirm that indirect bypass surgery had induced the formation of a new arterial network (arteriogenesis) and that this network had been maintained for more than 20 years to compensate for the chronic cerebral ischemia caused by the MMD.

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Maki Mukawa, Tadashi Nariai, Yoshiharu Matsushima, Yoji Tanaka, Motoki Inaji, Taketoshi Maehara, Masaru Aoyagi, and Kikuo Ohno

Object

Surgical revascularization is considered an effective treatment for juvenile patients with moyamoya disease (MMD). Yet the long-term outcome in surgically treated patients still needs to be clarified. More than 30 years have passed since the authors' department started intensively treating pediatric patients with MMD using indirect anastomosis techniques. In this study the authors surveyed the current status of these patients.

Methods

Activities of daily living (ADLs) were surveyed and present clinical status was assessed based on the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Cerebrovascular events subsequent to surgical treatment were also recorded.

Results

Since 1979, 208 patients younger than 19 years of age with MMD were surgically treated and followed up for > 3 years. Data were available on 172 patients (83%), who had been followed up for a mean of 14.3 years (range 3–32 years). Activity of daily living outcomes were as follows: 138 patients (80.2%) had mRS scores of 0–2, 29 (16.9%) a score of 3, 1 (0.6%) a score of 4, 1 (0.6%) a score of 5, and 3 (1.7%) a score of 6. Cerebrovascular events occurred 8 or more years after surgery in 6 patients (3.4%), that is, 6 hemorrhages and 3 infarctions. The cumulative risk of late-onset stroke at 10, 20, and 30 years after surgical intervention was 0.8%, 6.3%, and 10.0%, respectively.

Conclusions

This long-term survey demonstrated that most surgically treated pediatric patients with MMD maintain good ADL outcomes. However, a significant number of new cerebrovascular events occurred more than 10 years after the initial surgery. Additional follow-up will help to identify which events may occur during the adult years of patients treated as children.

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Tadashi Nariai, Katsushige Sato, Kimiyoshi Hirakawa, Yoshihisa Ohta, Yoji Tanaka, Kiichi Ishiwata, Kenji Ishii, Kohtaro Kamino, and Kikuo Ohno

Object

Intrinsic optical signals in response to somatosensory stimuli were intraoperatively recorded during brain tumor surgery. In the present study, the authors report on the use of this technique as an intraoperative guide for the safe resection of tumors adjacent to or within the sensorimotor cortex.

Methods

In 14 patients with tumors adjacent to or within the sensorimotor cortex, intrinsic optical signals in response to somatosensory stimuli were recorded by illuminating the brain surface with Xe white light and imaging the reflected light passing through a bandpass filter (605 nm). Results were compared with intraoperative recordings of sensory evoked potentials in all 14 patients and with noninvasive mapping modalities such as magnetoencephalography and positron emission tomography in selected patients. In all but two patients, the somatosensory optical signals were recorded on the primary sensory cortex. Optical signals elicited by stimulation of the first and fifth digits and the three branches of the trigeminal nerve were recorded at different locations on the sensory strip. This somatotopic information was useful in determining the resection border in patients with glioma located in the sensorimotor cortex.

Conclusions

Optical imaging of intrinsic signals is a useful technique with superior spatial resolution for delineating the somatotopic representation of human primary sensory cortex. Furthermore, it can be used as an intraoperative monitoring tool to improve the safety and accuracy of resections of brain tumors adjacent to or within the sensorimotor cortex.

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Tadashi Nariai, Yoji Tanaka, Hiroaki Wakimoto, Masaru Aoyagi, Masashi Tamaki, Kiichi Ishiwata, Michio Senda, Kenji Ishii, Kimiyoshi Hirakawa, and Kikuo Ohno

Object

The authors retrospectively analyzed the data obtained in patients who had undergone l-[methyl-11C] methionine (MET)—positron emission tomography (PET) studies to clarify the relationship between MET uptake and tumor biological features and to discuss the clinical usefulness of MET-PET studies.

Methods

One hundred ninety-four patients with cerebral glioma or suspected glioma underwent PET scanning 20 minutes after injection of MET, whose uptake into the tumor was expressed as a ratio to contralateral healthy brain tissue (T/N ratio). Analyses were performed to determine how MET uptake correlated with tumor pathological features and prognosis. The T/N ratios before and after various treatments were also examined.

There were significant differences in the T/N ratio among the nonneoplastic lesions, low-grade gliomas, and malignant gliomas. Furthermore, there were significant correlations between patient survival and pretreatment T/N ratios. Among patients with malignant gliomas, a significant difference in survival was observed between cases with and without postoperative tumor remnant based on elevated MET uptake. The MET uptake was heterogeneous even among the homogeneous tumor areas demonstrated on MR imaging. Malignant pathological features were detected in the areas with the highest MET uptake. The effectiveness of radiotherapy or chemotherapy was expressed as a significantly decreased T/N ratio in some of the tumor types.

Conclusions

The ability of MET-PET to reflect the biological nature of gliomas makes it an excellent method for monitoring active tumor tissue, and treatments based on its findings should provide a powerful clinical protocol in the course of glioma therapy.

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Shoko Hara, Maki Mukawa, Hiroyuki Akagawa, Thiparpa Thamamongood, Motoki Inaji, Yoji Tanaka, Taketoshi Maehara, Hidetoshi Kasuya, and Tadashi Nariai

OBJECTIVE

The authors’ objective was to investigate the influence of the RNF213 p.R4810K variant on the clinical presentation and outcomes of Japanese pediatric patients with moyamoya disease.

METHODS

A total of 129 Japanese patients with pediatric-onset moyamoya disease (onset age ≤ 15 years) who visited the authors’ department from 2012 to 2020 participated in this study. After RNF213 p.R4810K genotyping of each patient was performed, the relationship between genotype and clinical presentation or outcomes, including onset age, initial presentation, surgical outcomes, and subsequent cerebrovascular events, was evaluated. Patients without the p.R4810K variant were tested for RNF213 variants other than p.R4810K. The authors especially focused on the results of patients who presented with moyamoya disease at younger than 1 year of age (infantile onset).

RESULTS

Compared with the patients with heterozygous variants, patients without the p.R4810K variant were younger at onset (7.1 ± 3.7 vs 4.4 ± 0.9 years), and all 4 patients with infantile onset lacked the p.R4810K variant. A greater proportion of patients without the p.R4810K variant presented with infarction than patients with the heterozygous variant (24.0% vs 7.6%) and a decreased proportion presented with transient ischemic attack (36.0% vs 71.7%). No significant correlation was observed between p.R4810K genotype and clinical outcomes, including surgical outcomes and subsequent cerebrovascular events; however, a decreased proportion of patients without the p.R4810K variant had good surgical outcomes compared with that of patients with the heterozygous variant (76.5% vs 92.2%). Among the 25 patients without the p.R4810K variant, 8 rare variants other than p.R4810K were identified. Three of 4 patients with infantile onset had RNF213 variants other than p.R4810K, which had a more severe functional effect on this gene than p.R4810K.

CONCLUSIONS

Absence of the RNF213 p.R4810K variant may be a novel biomarker for identification of a severe form of pediatric moyamoya disease.