Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 21 items for

  • Author or Editor: Suresh N. Magge x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Jordan Xu, Gira Morchi, and Suresh N. Magge

BACKGROUND

Displacement of a distal catheter of a ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt is a rare complication and can lead to a challenging extraction requiring endovascular retrieval of the distal catheter.

OBSERVATIONS

The authors describe a patient in whom the distal catheter of the VA shunt had become displaced and traveled through the tricuspid valve into the right ventricular outflow tract.

LESSONS

In this case report, the authors present a multidisciplinary approach to retrieving a displaced distal catheter from a VA shunt.

Open access

Chase H. Foster, Anthony J. Vargas, Elizabeth Wells, Robert F. Keating, and Suresh N. Magge

BACKGROUND

The ability of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to cause neurological insults in afflicted adults is becoming increasingly understood by way of an ever-growing amount of international data. By contrast, the pandemic illness’s neurological effects in the pediatric population are both poorly understood and sparsely reported.

OBSERVATIONS

In this case, the authors reported their experience with a preschool-age child with hydrocephalus who suffered multiterritory strokes presumed secondary to immune-mediated cerebral vasculopathy as a result of asymptomatic COVID-19 infection.

LESSONS

Growing evidence indicates that COVID-19 can cause neurological sequelae such as encephalitis and strokes. In this case report, the authors discussed a case of cerebral vasculopathy and strokes in a pediatric patient who was positive for COVID-19.

Restricted access

Brian R. Curtis, Rory J. Petteys, Christopher T. Rossi, Robert F. Keating, and Suresh N. Magge

Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is an uncommon benign, tumorlike lesion of bone that is usually located in the long bones and spine. On rare occasions, ABCs are found in the bones of the cranial vault and skull base, occasionally causing mass effect and cranial nerve findings. In this report the authors detail the case of a patient who presented with incidentally discovered hydrocephalus due to a large ABC of the occipital bone that produced mass effect and obstruction of CSF. The diagnosis, imaging findings, and surgical management of this interesting and rare case are discussed.

Full access

Benjamin C. Wood, Albert K. Oh, Robert F. Keating, Michael J. Boyajian, John S. Myseros, Suresh N. Magge, and Gary F. Rogers

OBJECT

Progressive postnatal pansynostosis (PPP) is a rare form of craniosynostosis that is characterized by a normal head shape, insidious decrease in percentile head circumference, and high rates of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). This investigation describes the clinical, radiographic, and genetic features of this entity.

METHODS

The authors’ craniofacial database for the period 1997–2013 was retrospectively culled to identify patients who had a normal or near-normal head shape and CT-confirmed multiple-suture synostosis. Patients with kleeblatt-schädel or previous craniofacial surgery were excluded. All demographic information was collected and analyzed.

RESULTS

Seventeen patients fit the inclusion criteria. Nine patients had a syndromic diagnosis: Crouzon syndrome (n = 4), Pfeiffer syndrome (n = 2), Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (n = 1), Apert syndrome (n = 1), and achondroplasia (n = 1). With the exception of 3 patients with mild turricephaly, all patients had a relatively normal head shape. Patients were diagnosed at an average age of 62.9 months. Nearly all patients had some combination of clinical, radiographic, or ophthalmological evidence of increased ICP.

CONCLUSIONS

PPP is insidious; diagnosis is typically delayed because the clinical signs are subtle and appear gradually. All normocephalic infants or children with a known or suspected craniosynostotic disorder should be carefully monitored; any decrease in percentile head circumference or signs/symptoms of increased ICP should prompt CT evaluation.

Restricted access

Alan Siu, Gary F. Rogers, John S. Myseros, Siri S. Khalsa, Robert F. Keating, and Suresh N. Magge

There is no known correlation between Down syndrome and craniosynostosis. The authors report 2 infants with trisomy 21 and right unilateral coronal craniosynostosis. Both patients were clinically asymptomatic but displayed characteristic craniofacial features associated with each disorder. One patient underwent a bilateral fronto-orbital advancement and the other underwent an endoscopically assisted strip craniectomy with postoperative helmet therapy. Both patients demonstrated good cosmesis at follow-up.

Full access

Siri Sahib S. Khalsa, Alan Siu, Tiffani A. DeFreitas, Justin M. Cappuzzo, John S. Myseros, Suresh N. Magge, Chima O. Oluigbo, and Robert F. Keating

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies have indicated an association of Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) and a small posterior fossa. Most of these studies have been limited by 2D quantitative methods, and more recent studies utilizing 3D methodologies are time-intensive with manual segmentation. The authors sought to develop a more automated tool to calculate the 3D posterior fossa volume, and correlate its changes after decompression with surgical outcomes.

METHODS

A semiautomated segmentation program was developed, and used to compare the pre- and postoperative volumes of the posterior cranial fossa (PCF) and the CSF spaces (cisterna magna, prepontine cistern, and fourth ventricle) in a cohort of pediatric patients with CM-I. Volume changes were correlated with postoperative symptomatic improvements in headache, syrinx, tonsillar descent, cervicomedullary kinking, and overall surgical success.

RESULTS

Forty-two pediatric patients were included in this study. The mean percentage increase in PCF volume was significantly greater in patients who showed clinical improvement versus no improvement in headache (5.89% vs 1.54%, p < 0.05) and tonsillar descent (6.52% vs 2.57%, p < 0.05). Overall clinical success was associated with a larger postoperative PCF volume increase (p < 0.05). These clinical improvements were also significantly associated with a larger increase in the volume of the cisterna magna (p < 0.05). The increase in the caudal portion of the posterior fossa volume was also larger in patients who showed improvement in syrinx (6.63% vs 2.58%, p < 0.05) and cervicomedullary kinking (9.24% vs 3.79%, p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

A greater increase in the postoperative PCF volume, and specifically an increase in the cisterna magna volume, was associated with a greater likelihood of clinical improvements in headache and tonsillar descent in patients with CM-I. Larger increases in the caudal portion of the posterior fossa volume were also associated with a greater likelihood of improvement in syrinx and cervicomedullary kinking.

Restricted access

Jonathan Roth, Robert F. Keating, John S. Myseros, Amanda L. Yaun, Suresh N. Magge, and Shlomi Constantini

Object

Rising numbers of MRI studies performed during evaluations for pediatric disorders have contributed to a significant increase in the number of incidentally found brain tumors. Currently, there is very little literature on the nature of and the preferred treatment for these incidental brain tumors. In this paper the authors review their experience diagnosing and treating these lesions in children as well as the current literature on this topic.

Methods

Records from 2 centers were reviewed for incidentally found brain tumors, treatment approaches, and outcomes for both surgical and nonsurgical cohorts.

Results

Forty-seven children (30 males and 17 females) with a mean age of 8.6 years were found to have incidental brain lesions suspected to be neoplasms. Twenty-five underwent surgery and 22 were observed. Two children in the observation group required surgery at a later stage. Tumor pathology in 24 patients was benign. Only 3 patients had high-grade tumors. All nonsurgically treated lesions were presumed to be low-grade tumors and were followed up for 25 ± 20 months.

Conclusions

The discovery of incidental brain tumors on MRI in children poses an increasing challenge. Additional studies are needed to determine the significance as well as the optimal management strategies in this situation.

Restricted access

Suresh N. Magge, H. Isaac Chen, Greg G. Heuer, Lee R. Carrasco, Phillip B. Storm, and M.D.

✓Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa is a rare event due to anatomical and biome chanical factors. The authors report the case of a 12-year-old girl who presented with this condition after colliding with a classmate. One day after her injury, the patient demonstrated an inability to close her mouth completely, and she had minor tenderness to palpation anterior to the tragus, without neurological deficits. Imaging studies demonstrated a frac tured glenoid fossa with intrusion of the mandible into the cranial cavity. Open reduction of the mandibular condyle was performed, and the glenoid fossa was reconstructed with a split-thickness bone graft and titanium screws. Several dural tears noted at the time of surgery were repaired primarily.

Mandibular condyle dislocation into the middle cranial fossa is often misdiagnosed initially because of its low inci dence and nonspecific symptoms. Computed tomography scanning is the most sensitive diagnostic study for detecting this injury. Closed reduction after induction of general anesthesia has been recommended in recently suffered injuries without neurological deficits, but this approach may overlook damage to intracranial structures. Surgical repair is rec ommended if neurological injury is suspected. Treatment options should be tailored to the individual factors of each case.

Full access

Benjamin C. Wood, Edward S. Ahn, Joanna Y. Wang, Albert K. Oh, Robert F. Keating, Gary F. Rogers, and Suresh N. Magge

OBJECTIVE

Endoscopic strip craniectomy (ESC) with postoperative helmet orthosis is a well-established treatment option for sagittal craniosynostosis. There are many technical variations to the surgery ranging from simple strip craniectomy to methods that employ multiple cranial osteotomies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the addition of lateral barrel-stave osteotomies during ESC improved morphological outcomes.

METHODS

An IRB-approved retrospective review was conducted on a consecutive series of cases involving ESC for sagittal craniosynostosis at 2 different institutions from March 2008 to August 2014. The patients in Group A underwent ESC and those in Group B had ESC with lateral barrel-stave osteotomies. Demographic and perioperative data were recorded; postoperative morphological outcomes were analyzed using 3D laser scan data acquired from a single orthotic manufacturer who managed patients from both institutions.

RESULTS

A total of 73 patients were included (34 in Group A and 39 in Group B). Compared with Group B patients, Group A patients had a shorter mean anesthetic time (161.7 vs 195 minutes; p < 0.01) and operative time (71.6 vs 111 minutes; p < 0.01). The mean hospital stay was similar for the 2 groups (1.2 days for Group A vs 1.4 days for Group B; p = 0.1). Adequate postoperative data on morphological outcomes were reported by the orthotic manufacturer for 65 patients (29 in Group A and 36 in Group B). The 2 groups had similar improvement in the cephalic index (CI): Group A, mean change 10.5% (mean preoperative CI 72.6, final 80.4) at a mean follow-up of 13.2 months; Group B, mean change 12.2% (mean preoperative CI 71.0, final 79.6) at a mean follow-up of 19.4 months. The difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.15).

CONCLUSIONS

Both ESC alone and ESC with barrel staving produced excellent outcomes. However, the addition of barrel staves did not improve the results and, therefore, may not be warranted in the endoscopic treatment of sagittal craniosynostosis.

Full access

Matthew F. Sacino, Cheng-Ying Ho, Matthew T. Whitehead, Amy Kao, Dewi Depositario-Cabacar, John S. Myseros, Suresh N. Magge, Robert F. Keating, William D. Gaillard, and Chima O. Oluigbo

OBJECTIVE

Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a common cause of medically intractable epilepsy that often may be treated by surgery. Following resection, many patients continue to experience seizures, necessitating a decision for further surgery to achieve the desired seizure outcomes. Few studies exist on the efficacy of reoperation for intractable epilepsy due to FCD in pediatric cohorts, including the definition of prognostic factors correlated with clinical benefit from further resection.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively analyzed the medical records and MR images of 22 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent repeat FCD resection after unsuccessful first surgery at the Children's National Health System between March 2005 and April 2015.

RESULTS

Accounting for all reoperations, 13 (59%) of the 22 patients achieved complete seizure freedom and another 5 patients (23%) achieved significant improvement in seizure control. Univariate analysis demonstrated that concordance in electrocorticography (ECoG) and MRI localization (p = 0.005), and completeness of resection (p = 0.0001), were associated with seizure freedom after the first reoperation. Patients with discordant ECoG and MRI findings ultimately benefited from aggressive multilobe lobectomy or hemispherectomy. Repeat lesionectomies utilizing intraoperative MRI (iMRI; n = 9) achieved complete resection and seizure freedom in all cases.

CONCLUSIONS

Reoperation may be clinically beneficial in patients with intractable epilepsy due to FCD. Patients with concordant intraoperative ECoG and MRI localization may benefit from extended resection of residual dysplasia at the margins of the previous lesional cavity, and iMRI may offer benefits as a quality control mechanism to ensure that a complete resection has been accomplished. Patients with discordant findings may benefit from more aggressive resections at earlier stages to achieve better seizure control and ensure functional plasticity.