Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 20 items for

  • Author or Editor: Sung-Min Kim x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Dae-Jean Jo, Yong-Sang Kim, Sung-Min Kim, Ki-Tack Kim and Eun-Min Seo

OBJECT

Most thoracolumbar fractures have a good healing outcome with adequate treatment. However, posttraumatic thoracolumbar kyphosis can occur in a proportion of thoracolumbar fractures after inappropriate treatment, osteoporosis, or osteonecrosis of the vertebral body. There are several surgical options to correct posttraumatic thoracolumbar kyphosis, including anterior, posterior, and combined approaches, which are associated with varying degrees of success. The aim of this study was to assess the use of a modified closing wedge osteotomy for the treatment of posttraumatic thoracolumbar kyphosis and to evaluate the radiographic findings and clinical outcomes of patients treated using this technique.

METHODS

Thirteen consecutive patients with symptomatic posttraumatic thoracolumbar kyphosis were treated using a modified closing wedge osteotomy. The mean patient age was 62 years. The kyphosis apex ranged from T-10 to L-2. The sagittal alignment, kyphotic angle, neurological function, visual analog scale for back pain, and Oswestry Disability Index were evaluated before surgery and at follow-up.

RESULTS

The mean preoperative regional angle was 27. 4°, and the mean correction angle was 29. 6°. Sagittal alignment improved with a mean correction rate of 58. 3%. The mean surgical time was 275 minutes, and the mean intraoperative blood loss was 1585 ml. The intraoperative complications included 2 dural tears, 1 nerve root injury, and 1 superficial wound infection. The mean visual analog scale score for back pain improved from 6. 6 to 2, and the Oswestry Disability Index score decreased from 55. 4 to 22. 6 at the last follow-up. All patients achieved bony anterior fusion based on the presence of trabecular bone bridging at the osteotomy site.

CONCLUTIONS

The modified posterior closing wedge osteotomy technique achieves satisfactory kyphosis correction with direct visualization of the circumferentially decompressed spinal cord, as well as good fusion with less blood loss and fewer complications. It is an alternative method for treating patients with posttraumatic thoracolumbar kyphosis.

Restricted access

Sung-Min Kim, T. Jesse Lim, Josemaria Paterno and Daniel H. Kim

Object. Facet screw fixation is the lowest profile lumbar stabilization method. In this study the immediate biomechanical stability provided by the two different types of fixation are compared: translaminar facet screw (TLFS) and transfacetopedicular screw (TFPS) placement after anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) using a femoral ring allograft. Both facet screw fixation types were also compared with the gold standard, transpedicular screw and rod (TSR) fixation.

Methods. Twenty-four human lumbosacral spines were tested in the following sequence: intact state, after discectomy, after ALIF, and after TLFS, TFPS, or TSR fixation. Intervertebral motions were measured by a video-based motion capture system. The range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) were compared for each loading to a maximum of 7.5 Nm.

The ROMs for stand-alone ALIFs were less than but similar to those of the intact spine, but NZs were slightly increased in all modes. The ROMs for both TLFS and TFPS fixation were significantly decreased from those of the intact spine in all modes and those of the stand-alone ALIF in flexion and extension. The TLFS and TFPS fixations significantly reduced NZs to below that of the intact spine in all modes. Compared with NZs for ALIF, both types of fixation revealed significantly lower values, except for TLFS placement in lateral bending and TFPS fixation in lateral bending and rotation. There were no significant differences between TLFS and TFPS fixation. There were also no significant differences among both TLFS and TFPS and TSR fixations, except that TFPS was inferior to TSR in lateral bending.

Conclusions. Stand-alone ALIF may not provide sufficient stability. Both facet fixations produced significant additional stability and both are comparable to TSR fixation. Although TFPS fixation revealed a slightly inferior result, TFPSs can be placed percutaneously with the assistance of fluoroscopic guidance and it makes the posterior facet fixation minimally invasive. Therefore, the TFPS fixation can be considered as a good alternative to TLFS fixation.

Restricted access

Dae-Jean Jo, Eun-Min Seo, Ki-Tack Kim, Sung-Min Kim and Sang-Hun Lee

Spondyloptosis is complete dislocation of the L-5 vertebral body on the sacrum anteriorly. Its optimal treatment is still controversial. In particular, choosing the optimal surgical technique is difficult in the osteoporotic elderly patient given the high incidence of instrumentation failure, pseudarthrosis, progressive slippage, and severe sagittal imbalance. The authors of this report used partial reduction and pedicular transvertebral screw fixation of the lumbosacral junction for the treatment of spondyloptosis in an osteoporotic elderly patient.

Restricted access

Sung-Min Kim, T. Jesse Lim, Josemaria Paterno, Jon Park and Daniel H. Kim

Object. The stability of lateral lumbar interbody graft—augmented fusion and supplementary lateral plate fixation in human cadavers has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the immediate biomechanical stabilities of the following: 1) femoral ring allograft (FRA)—augmented anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) after left lateral discectomy combined with additional lateral MACS HMA plate and screw fixation; and 2) ALIF combined with posterior transpedicular fixation after anterior discectomy.

Methods. Sixteen human lumbosacral spines were loaded with six modes of motion. The intervertebral motion was measured using a video-based motion-capturing system. The range of motion (ROM) and the neutral zone (NZ) in each loading mode were compared with a maximum of 7.5 Nm.

The ROM values for both stand-alone ALIF approaches were similar to those of the intact spine, whereas NZ measurements were higher in most loading modes. No significant intergroup differences were found. The ROM and NZ values for lateral fixation in all modes were significantly lower than those of intact spine, except when NZ was measured in lateral bending. All ROM and NZ values for transpedicular fixation were significantly lower than those for stand-alone anterior ALIF. Transpedicular fixation conferred better stabilization than lateral fixation in flexion, extension, and lateral bending modes.

Conclusions. Neither approach to stand-alone FRA-augmented ALIF provided sufficient stabilization, but supplementary instrumentation conferred significant stabilization. The MACS HMA plate and screw fixation system, although inferior to posterior transpedicular fixation, provided adequate stability compared with the intact spine and can serve as a sound alternative to supplementary spinal stabilization.

Restricted access

Sung-Min Kim, T. Jesse Lim, Josemaria Paterno, Jon Park and Daniel H. Kim

Object. In bilateral cervical facet dislocation, biomechanical stabilities between anterior locking screw/plate fixation after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDFP) and posterior transpedicular screw/rod fixation after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDFTP) have not been compared using the human cadaver, although ACDFP has been performed frequently. In this study the stability of ACDFP, a posterior wiring procedure after ACDFP (ACDFPW), and ACDFTP for treatment of bilateral cervical facet dislocation were compared.

Methods. Spines (C3—T1) from 10 human cadavers were tested in the intact state, and then after ACDFP, ACDFPW, and ACDFTP were performed. Intervertebral motion was measured using a video-based motion capture system. The range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ) were compared for each loading mode to a maximum of 2 Nm.

The ROM for spines treated with ACDFP was below that of the intact spine in all loading modes, with statistical significance in flexion and extension, but NZs were decreased in flexion and extension and slightly increased in bending and axial rotation; none of these showed statistical significance. The ACDFPW produced statistically significant additional stability in axial rotation ROM and in flexion NZ than ACDFP. The ACDFTP provided better stability than ACDFP in bending and axial rotation, and better stability than ACDFPW in bending for both ROM and NZ. There was no significant difference in extension with either ROM or NZ for the three fixation methods.

Conclusions. The spines treated with ACDFTP demonstrated the most effective stabilization, followed by those treated with ACDFPW, and then ACDFP. The spines receiving ACDFP also revealed a higher stability than the intact spine in most loading modes; thus ACDFP can also provide a relatively effective stabilization in bilateral cervical facet dislocation, but with the aid of a brace.

Restricted access

Sung Mo Ryu, Sun-Ho Lee, Kyung Min Lee, Whan Eoh and Eun-Sang Kim

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to elucidate the features and surgical outcomes of cervical schwannomas.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of 90 patients who underwent surgically treated cervical schwannomas from January 1995 to December 2017, with an emphasis on MRI findings such as tumor location, tumor size, extent of tumor resection, and growth of a residual tumor.

RESULTS

This study included 51 men (56.7%) and 39 women (43.3%) with a mean age of 44.5 years (range 7–77 years). Dumbbell-shaped tumors comprised 62 (68.9%) of 90 cases and gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 59 (65.6%) of 90 cases. All nondumbbell tumors (n = 28) underwent GTR. Only 1 case of recurrence in the GTR group showed a gradual increase in size (by 8.9 mm) during the 150-month follow-up period. For the regrowth patients in the subtotal resection group, the mean percentage increase in tumor size was 47.5% ± 33.1% and the mean growth rate was 5.8 ± 4.6 mm/year during the 20.3-month follow-up period. However, the size of residual tumor spontaneously decreased by a mean of 8.3% ± 11.1% during the 48.4-month follow-up period in the nonregrowth group.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggested that frequent MRI follow-up examinations are required for residual schwannomas in the cervical spine for at least 2 years, and continuous MRI follow-ups are also required thereafter.

Full access

Seung-Hoon Lim, Dae-Jean Jo, Sung-Min Kim and Young-Jin Lim

Despite various complications associated with sacrectomy to remove sacral tumors, total or en bloc sacrectomy has been suggested as the most appropriate surgical treatment in such cases. The authors present the case of a 62-year-old male patient with intractable back pain and voiding difficulty whom they treated with posterior en bloc sacral hemiresection followed by reconstruction using dual U-shaped rods. They report that good spinopelvic stability was achieved without complications. The authors conclude that this technique is relatively simple compared with other sacral reconstructive techniques and can prevent complications, including herniation.

Restricted access

Hae Yu Kim, Yun Jung Hur, Heung-Dong Kim, Kang Min Park, Sung Eun Kim and Tae Gyu Hwang

OBJECTIVE

Thalamic stimulation can provoke electroencephalography (EEG) synchronization or desynchronization, which can help to reduce the occurrence of seizures in intractable epilepsy, though the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Therefore, the authors investigated changes in EEG electrical activity to better understand the seizure-reducing effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with intractable epilepsy.

METHODS

Electrical activation patterns in the epileptogenic brains of 3 patients were analyzed using classical low-resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis recursively applied (CLARA). Electrical activity recorded during thalamic stimulation was compared with that recorded during the preoperative and postoperative off-stimulation states in patients who underwent anterior thalamic nucleus DBS for intractable epilepsy.

RESULTS

Interictal EEG was fully synchronized to the β frequency in the postoperative on-stimulation period. The CLARA showed that electrical activity during preoperative and postoperative off-stimulation states was localized in cortical and subcortical areas, including the insular, middle frontal, mesial temporal, and precentral areas. No electrical activity was localized in deep nucleus structures. However, with CLARA, electrical activity in the postoperative on-stimulation period was localized in the anterior cingulate area, basal ganglia, and midbrain.

CONCLUSIONS

Anterior thalamic stimulation could spread electrical current to the underlying neuronal networks that connect with the thalamus, which functions as a cortical pacemaker. Consequently, the thalamus could modify electrical activity within these neuronal networks and influence cortical EEG activity by inducing neuronal synchronization between the thalamus and cortical structures.

Restricted access

Yong-Chan Kim, Ji Hao Cui, Ki-Tack Kim, Gyu-Taek Park, Keun-Ho Lee, Sung-Min Kim and Lawrence G. Lenke

OBJECTIVE

In this study, the authors’ goal was to develop and validate novel radiographic parameters that better describe total body sagittal alignment (TBSA).

METHODS

One hundred sixty-six consecutive operative spinal deformity patients were evaluated using full-body stereoradiographic imaging. Seven TBSA parameters were measured and then correlated to 6 commonly used spinopelvic measurements. TBSA measures consisted of 4 distance measures relating the cranial center of mass (CCOM) to the sacrum, hips, knees, and ankles, and 3 angular measures relating the CCOM to the hips, knees, and ankles. Furthermore, each TBSA parameter was correlated to patient-reported outcome (PRO) scores using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Scoliosis Research Society–22 (SRS-22) instruments. Thirty patients were randomly selected for inter- and intraobserver reliability testing of the TBSA parameters using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs).

RESULTS

All TBSA radiographic parameters demonstrated strong linear correlation with the currently accepted primary measure of sagittal balance, the C7 sagittal vertical axis (r = 0.55–0.96, p < 0.001). Moreover, 5 of 7 TBSA measures correlated strongly with ODI and SRS-22 total scores (r = 0.42–0.51, p < 0.001). Inter- and intraobserver reliability for all TBSA measures was good to excellent (interrater ICC = 0.70–0.98, intrarater ICC = 0.77–1.0).

CONCLUSIONS

In spine deformity patients, novel TBSA radiographic parameters correlated well with PROs and with currently utilized spinal sagittal measurements. Inter- and intrarater reliability was high for these novel parameters. This is the first study to propose a reliable method for measuring head-to-toe global spinal alignment.

Full access

Min Soo Kim, Kyu Hong Kim, Eun Hee Lee, Young Min Lee, Sung-Hun Lee, Hyung Dong Kim and Young Zoon Kim

Object

The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of certain cell-cycle regulatory proteins in the recurrence of atypical meningiomas. These proteins were analyzed with immunohistochemical staining to identify predisposing factors for the recurrence of atypical meningiomas.

Methods

The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with atypical meningiomas diagnosed in the period from January 2000 to June 2012 at the Department of Neurosurgery at Samsung Changwon Hospital and Dong-A University Medical Center. Clinical data included patient sex and age at the time of surgery, presenting symptoms at diagnosis, location and size of tumor, extent of surgery, use of postoperative radiotherapy, duration of follow-up, and recurrence. Immunohistochemical staining for cell-cycle regulatory proteins (p16, p15, p21, p27, cyclin-dependent kinase [CDK] 4 and 6, phosphorylated retinoblastoma [pRB] protein, and cyclin D1) and proliferative markers (MIB-1 antigen, mitosis, and p53) was performed on archived paraffin-embedded tissues obtained during resection. The recurrence rate and time to recurrence were assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis.

Results

Of the 67 atypical meningiomas eligible for analysis, 26 (38.8%) recurred during the follow-up period (mean duration 47.7 months, range 8.4–132.1 months). Immunohistochemically, there was overstaining for p16 in 44 samples (65.7%), for p15 in 21 samples (31.3%), for p21 in 25 samples (37.3%), for p27 in 32 samples (47.8%), for CDK4 in 38 samples (56.7%), for CDK6 in 26 samples (38.8%), for pRB protein in 42 samples (62.7%), and for cyclin D1 in 49 samples (73.1%). Multivariate analysis using the Cox proportional-hazards regression model showed that incomplete resection (HR 4.513, p < 0.001); immunohistochemical understaining for p16 (HR 3.214, p < 0.001); immunohistochemical overstaining for CDK6 (HR 3.427, p < 0.001), pRB protein (HR 2.854, p = 0.008), and p53 (HR 2.296, p = 0.040); and increased MIB-1 labeling index (HR 2.665, p = 0.013) and mitotic index (HR 2.438, p = 0.024) predicted the recurrence of atypical meningiomas after resection.

Conclusions

Findings in this study indicated that p16, CDK6, and pRB protein were associated with the recurrence of atypical meningiomas.