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Nida Fatima, Victoria Y. Ding, Summer S. Han, Steven D. Chang and Antonio Meola

OBJECTIVE

Cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM) can affect visual function and require expeditious treatment to prevent permanent visual loss. Authors of this retrospective study sought to determine the factors associated with visual functional outcomes in CSM patients treated with surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), alone or in combination.

METHODS

Consecutive patients with CSM who had presented at an academic tertiary care hospital from 2000 to 2018 were identified through retrospective chart review. Visual function—visual eye deficit (VED), optic disc (OD) appearance, intraocular pressure (IOP), and extraocular movement (EOM)—was assessed before and after treatment for CSM. VED with visual acuity (VA) ≤ 20/200 and visual field defect ≥ −11 dB, pale OD appearance in the ipsilateral or contralateral eye, increased ipsilateral IOP, and/or EOM restriction were defined as a poor visual functional outcome. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations between pretreatment visual functional assessment and posttreatment visual outcomes.

RESULTS

The study cohort included 44 patients (73% female; median age 55 years), with a median clinical follow-up of 14 months. Ipsilateral VED improved, remained stable, or worsened, respectively, in 0%, 33.4%, and 66.6% of the patients after subtotal resection (STR) alone; in 52.6%, 31.6%, and 15.8% after STR plus radiation treatment; in 28.5%, 43.0%, and 28.5% after gross-total resection (GTR) alone; and in 56.3%, 43.7%, and 0% after radiation treatment (SRS or SRT) alone. Contralateral VED remained intact in all the patients after STR alone and those with radiation treatment (SRS or SRT) alone; however, it improved, remained stable, or worsened in 10.5%, 84.2%, and 5.3% after STR plus radiation treatment and in 43.0%, 28.5%, and 28.5% after GTR alone. EOM remained intact, fully recovered, remained stable, and worsened, respectively, in 0%, 50%, 50%, and 0% of the patients after STR alone; in 36.8%, 47.4%, 15.8%, and 0% of the patients after STR with radiation treatment; in 57.1%, 0%, 28.6%, and 14.3% of the patients after GTR alone; and in 56.2%, 37.5%, 6.3%, and 0% of the patients after radiation treatment (SRS or SRT) alone.

In multivariable analyses adjusted for age, tumor volume, and treatment modality, initial ipsilateral poor VED (OR 10.1, 95% CI 1.05–97.2, p = 0.04) and initial ipsilateral pale OD appearance (OR 21.1, 95% CI 1.6–270.5, p = 0.02) were associated with poor ipsilateral VED posttreatment. Similarly, an initial pale OD appearance (OR 15.7, 95% CI 1.3–199.0, p = 0.03), initial poor VED (OR 21.7, 95% CI 1.2–398.6, p = 0.03), and a higher IOP in the ipsilateral eye (OR 55.3, 95% CI 1.7–173.9, p = 0.02) were associated with an ipsilateral pale OD appearance posttreatment. Furthermore, a higher initial ipsilateral IOP (OR 35.9, 95% CI 3.3–400.5, p = 0.004) was indicative of a higher IOP in the ipsilateral eye posttreatment. Finally, initial restricted EOM was indicative of restricted EOM posttreatment (OR 20.6, 95% CI 18.7–77.0, p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

Pretreatment visual functional assessment predicts visual outcomes in patients with CSM and can be used to identify patients at greater risk for vision loss.

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Ephraim W. Church, Rabia Qaiser, Teresa E. Bell-Stephens, Mark G. Bigder, Eric K. Chow, Summer S. Han, Yasser Y. El-Sayed and Gary K. Steinberg

OBJECTIVE

Moyamoya disease (MMD) disproportionately affects young to middle-aged women. The main treatment for this challenging disease is cerebral bypass surgery. Vascular neurosurgeons often need to counsel women regarding pregnancy following bypass for MMD, but there is a paucity of data. The authors set out to examine neurological and obstetric outcomes in an extensive cohort of MMD patients who had pregnancies following cerebral revascularization at the Stanford Medical Center.

METHODS

The authors identified all patients at their institution who underwent cerebral bypass for MMD from 1990 through 2018 and who later became pregnant. Some of these patients also had pregnancies prior to undergoing bypass surgery, and the authors examined these pregnancies as well. They performed a chart review and brief telephone survey to identify obstetric complications, transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), and strokes. Neurological and obstetric outcomes were compared to published rates. They also compared pre- and post-bypass pregnancy complication rates using logistic regression techniques.

RESULTS

There were 71 pregnancies among 56 women whose mean age was 30.5 years. Among 59 post-bypass pregnancies, there were 5 (8%) perinatal TIAs. There were no MRI-confirmed strokes or strokes with residual deficits. Among 12 pre-bypass pregnancies, there were 3 (25%) TIAs and 2 (17%) MRI-confirmed strokes. There were no hemorrhagic complications in either group. In the generalized estimating equations analysis, performing cerebral revascularization prior to pregnancy versus after pregnancy was associated with lower odds of perinatal stroke or TIA (OR 0.15, p = 0.0061). Nine pregnancies (13%) were complicated by preeclampsia, and there was one (1%) instance of eclampsia. The overall rate of cesarean delivery was 39%. There were 2 miscarriages, both occurring in the first trimester. There were no maternal deaths.

CONCLUSIONS

The authors present neurological and obstetric outcomes data in a large cohort of MMD patients. These data indicate that post-bypass pregnancy is accompanied by low complication rates. There were no ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes among post-bypass pregnant MMD patients. The rate of obstetric complications was low overall. The authors recommend close collaboration between the vascular neurosurgeon and the obstetrician regarding medical management, including blood pressure goals and continuation of low-dose aspirin.