Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author or Editor: Steve Braunstein x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Michael W. McDermott, Jason Sheehan and Steve Braunstein

Free access

Peng Dong, Angélica Pérez-Andújar, Dilini Pinnaduwage, Steve Braunstein, Philip Theodosopoulos, Michael McDermott, Penny Sneed and Lijun Ma

OBJECTIVE

Noninvasive Gamma Knife (GK) platforms, such as the relocatable frame and on-board imaging, have enabled hypofractionated GK radiosurgery of large or complex brain lesions. This study aimed to characterize the dosimetric quality of such treatments against linear accelerator–based delivery systems that include the CyberKnife (CK) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

METHODS

Ten patients treated with VMAT at the authors' institution for large brain tumors (> 3 cm in maximum diameter) were selected for the study. The median prescription dose was 25 Gy (range 20–30 Gy) in 5 fractions. The median planning target volume (PTV) was 9.57 cm3 (range 1.94–24.81 cm3). Treatment planning was performed using Eclipse External Beam Planning V11 for VMAT on the Varian TrueBeam system, Multiplan V4.5 for the CyberKnife VSI System, and Leksell GammaPlan V10.2 for the Gamma Knife Perfexion system. The percentage of the PTV receiving at least the prescription dose was normalized to be identical across all platforms for individual cases. The prescription isodose value for the PTV, conformity index, Paddick gradient index, mean and maximum doses for organs at risk, and normal brain dose at variable isodose volumes ranging from the 5-Gy isodose volume (V5) to the 15-Gy isodose volume (V15) were compared for all of the cases.

RESULTS

The mean Paddick gradient index was 2.6 ± 0.2, 3.2 ± 0.5, and 4.3 ± 1.0 for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p < 0.002). The mean V15 was 7.5 ± 3.7 cm3 (range 1.53–13.29 cm3), 9.8 ± 5.5 cm3 (range 2.07–18.45 cm3), and 16.1 ± 10.6 cm3 (range 3.58–36.53 cm3) for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p ≤ 0.03, paired 2-tailed t-tests). However, the average conformity index was 1.18, 1.12, and 1.21 for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively (p > 0.06). The average prescription isodose values were 52% (range 47%–69%), 60% (range 46%–68%), and 88% (range 70%–94%) for GK, CK, and VMAT, respectively, thus producing significant variations in dose hot spots among the 3 platforms. Furthermore, the mean V5 values for GK and CK were similar (p > 0.79) at 71.9 ± 36.2 cm3 and 73.3 ± 31.8 cm3, respectively, both of which were statistically lower (p < 0.01) than the mean V5 value of 124.6 ± 67.1 cm3 for VMAT.

CONCLUSIONS

Significantly better near-target normal brain sparing was noted for hypofractionated GK radiosurgery versus linear accelerator–based treatments. Such a result supports the use of a large number of isocenters or confocal beams for the benefit of normal tissue sparing in hypofractionated brain radiosurgery.

Free access

Joshua Chiu, Steve Braunstein, Jean Nakamura, Philip Theodosopoulos, Penny Sneed, Michael McDermott and Lijun Ma

OBJECTIVE

Interfractional residual patient shifts are often observed during the delivery of hypofractionated brain radiosurgery. In this study, the authors developed a robustness treatment planning check procedure to assess the dosimetric effects of residual target shifts on hypofractionated Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS).

METHODS

The residual patient shifts were determined during the simulation process immediately after patient immobilization. To mimic incorporation of residual target shifts during treatment delivery, a quality assurance procedure was developed to sample and shift individual shots according to the residual uncertainties in the prescribed treatment plan. This procedure was tested and demonstrated for 10 hypofractionated GKRS cases.

RESULTS

The maximum residual target shifts were less than 1 mm for the studied cases. When incorporating such shifts, the target coverage varied by 1.9% ± 2.2% (range 0.0%–7.1%) and selectivity varied by 3.6% ± 2.5% (range 1.1%–9.3%). Furthermore, when incorporating extra random shifts on the order of 0.5 mm, the target coverage decreased by as much as 7%, and nonisocentric variation in the dose distributions was noted for the studied cases.

CONCLUSIONS

A pretreatment robustness check procedure was developed and demonstrated for hypofractionated GKRS. Further studies are underway to implement this procedure to assess maximum tolerance levels for individual patient cases.

Full access

William C. Chen, Stephen T. Magill, Ashley Wu, Harish N. Vasudevan, Olivier Morin, Manish K. Aghi, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Arie Perry, Michael W. McDermott, Penny K. Sneed, Steve E. Braunstein and David R. Raleigh

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) on local recurrence and overall survival in patients undergoing primary resection of atypical meningioma, and to identify predictive factors to inform patient selection for adjuvant RT.

METHODS

One hundred eighty-two patients who underwent primary resection of atypical meningioma at a single institution between 1993 and 2014 were retrospectively identified. Patient, meningioma, and treatment data were extracted from the medical record and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, multivariate analysis (MVA) Cox proportional hazards models with relative risk (RR), and recursive partitioning analysis.

RESULTS

The median patient age and imaging follow-up were 57 years (interquartile range [IQR] 45–67 years) and 4.4 years (IQR 1.8–7.5 years), respectively. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 114 cases (63%), and 42 patients (23%) received adjuvant RT. On MVA, prognostic factors for death from any cause included GTR (RR 0.4, 95% CI 0.1–0.9, p = 0.02) and MIB1 labeling index (LI) ≤ 7% (RR 0.4, 95% CI 0.1–0.9, p = 0.04). Prognostic factors on MVA for local progression included GTR (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.5, p = 0.002), adjuvant RT (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.4, p < 0.001), MIB1 LI ≤ 7% (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.5, p < 0.001), and a remote history of prior cranial RT (RR 5.7, 95% CI 1.3–18.8, p = 0.03). After GTR, adjuvant RT (0 of 10 meningiomas recurred, p = 0.01) and MIB1 LI ≤ 7% (RR 0.1, 95% CI 0.003–0.3, p < 0.001) were predictive for local progression on MVA. After GTR, 2.2% of meningiomas with MIB1 LI ≤ 7% recurred (1 of 45), compared with 38% with MIB1 LI > 7% (13 of 34; p < 0.001). Recursive partitioning analysis confirmed the existence of a cohort of patients at high risk of local progression after GTR without adjuvant RT, with MIB1 LI > 7%, and evidence of brain or bone invasion. After subtotal resection, adjuvant RT (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.04–0.7, p = 0.009) and ≤ 5 mitoses per 10 hpf (RR 0.1, 95% CI 0.03–0.4, p = 0.002) were predictive on MVA for local progression.

CONCLUSIONS

Adjuvant RT improves local control of atypical meningioma irrespective of extent of resection. Although independent validation is required, the authors’ results suggest that MIB1 LI, the number of mitoses per 10 hpf, and brain or bone invasion may be useful guides to the selection of patients who are most likely to benefit from adjuvant RT after resection of atypical meningioma.

Full access

William C. Chen, Stephen T. Magill, Ashley Wu, Harish N. Vasudevan, Olivier Morin, Manish K. Aghi, Philip V. Theodosopoulos, Arie Perry, Michael W. McDermott, Penny K. Sneed, Steve E. Braunstein and David R. Raleigh

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) on local recurrence and overall survival in patients undergoing primary resection of atypical meningioma, and to identify predictive factors to inform patient selection for adjuvant RT.

METHODS

One hundred eighty-two patients who underwent primary resection of atypical meningioma at a single institution between 1993 and 2014 were retrospectively identified. Patient, meningioma, and treatment data were extracted from the medical record and compared using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank tests, multivariate analysis (MVA) Cox proportional hazards models with relative risk (RR), and recursive partitioning analysis.

RESULTS

The median patient age and imaging follow-up were 57 years (interquartile range [IQR] 45–67 years) and 4.4 years (IQR 1.8–7.5 years), respectively. Gross-total resection (GTR) was achieved in 114 cases (63%), and 42 patients (23%) received adjuvant RT. On MVA, prognostic factors for death from any cause included GTR (RR 0.4, 95% CI 0.1–0.9, p = 0.02) and MIB1 labeling index (LI) ≤ 7% (RR 0.4, 95% CI 0.1–0.9, p = 0.04). Prognostic factors on MVA for local progression included GTR (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.5, p = 0.002), adjuvant RT (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.4, p < 0.001), MIB1 LI ≤ 7% (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.5, p < 0.001), and a remote history of prior cranial RT (RR 5.7, 95% CI 1.3–18.8, p = 0.03). After GTR, adjuvant RT (0 of 10 meningiomas recurred, p = 0.01) and MIB1 LI ≤ 7% (RR 0.1, 95% CI 0.003–0.3, p < 0.001) were predictive for local progression on MVA. After GTR, 2.2% of meningiomas with MIB1 LI ≤ 7% recurred (1 of 45), compared with 38% with MIB1 LI > 7% (13 of 34; p < 0.001). Recursive partitioning analysis confirmed the existence of a cohort of patients at high risk of local progression after GTR without adjuvant RT, with MIB1 LI > 7%, and evidence of brain or bone invasion. After subtotal resection, adjuvant RT (RR 0.2, 95% CI 0.04–0.7, p = 0.009) and ≤ 5 mitoses per 10 hpf (RR 0.1, 95% CI 0.03–0.4, p = 0.002) were predictive on MVA for local progression.

CONCLUSIONS

Adjuvant RT improves local control of atypical meningioma irrespective of extent of resection. Although independent validation is required, the authors’ results suggest that MIB1 LI, the number of mitoses per 10 hpf, and brain or bone invasion may be useful guides to the selection of patients who are most likely to benefit from adjuvant RT after resection of atypical meningioma.

Full access

Michael A. Garcia, Ann Lazar, Sai Duriseti, David R. Raleigh, Christopher P. Hess, Shannon E. Fogh, Igor J. Barani, Jean L. Nakamura, David A. Larson, Philip Theodosopoulos, Michael McDermott, Penny K. Sneed and Steve Braunstein

OBJECTIVE

High-resolution double-dose gadolinium-enhanced Gamma Knife (GK) radiosurgery-planning MRI (GK MRI) on the day of GK treatment can detect additional brain metastases undiagnosed on the prior diagnostic MRI scan (dMRI), revealing increased intracranial disease burden on the day of radiosurgery, and potentially necessitating a reevaluation of appropriate management. The authors identified factors associated with detecting additional metastases on GK MRI and investigated the relationship between detection of additional metastases and postradiosurgery patient outcomes.

METHODS

The authors identified 326 patients who received GK radiosurgery at their institution from 2010 through 2013 and had a prior dMRI available for comparison of numbers of brain metastases. Factors predictive of additional brain metastases on GK MRI were investigated using logistic regression analysis. Overall survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier method, and postradiosurgery distant intracranial failure was estimated by cumulative incidence measures. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards model and Fine-Gray regression modeling assessed potential risk factors of overall survival and distant intracranial failure, respectively.

RESULTS

The mean numbers of brain metastases (SD) on dMRI and GK MRI were 3.4 (4.2) and 5.8 (7.7), respectively, and additional brain metastases were found on GK MRI in 48.9% of patients. Frequencies of detecting additional metastases for patients with 1, 2, 3–4, and more than 4 brain metastases on dMRI were 29.5%, 47.9%, 55.9%, and 79.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). An index brain metastasis with a diameter greater than 1 cm on dMRI was inversely associated with detecting additional brain metastases, with an adjusted odds ratio of 0.57 (95% CI 0.4–0.9, p = 0.02). The median time between dMRI and GK MRI was 22 days (range 1–88 days), and time between scans was not associated with detecting additional metastases. Patients with additional brain metastases did not have larger total radiosurgery target volumes, and they rarely had an immediate change in management (abortion of radiosurgery or addition of whole-brain radiation therapy) due to detection of additional metastases. Patients with additional metastases had a higher incidence of distant intracranial failure than those without additional metastases (p = 0.004), with an adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio of 1.4 (95% CI 1.0–2.0, p = 0.04). Significantly worse overall survival was not detected for patients with additional brain metastases on GK MRI (log-rank p = 0.07), with the relative adjusted hazard ratio of 1.07, (95% CI 0.81–1.41, p = 0.65).

CONCLUSIONS

Detecting additional brain metastases on GK MRI is strongly associated with the number of brain metastases on dMRI and inversely associated with the size of the index brain metastasis. The discovery of additional brain metastases at time of GK radiosurgery is very unlikely to lead to aborting radiosurgery but is associated with a higher incidence of distant intracranial failure. However, there is not a significant difference in survival.

▪ CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE Type of question: prognostic; study design: retrospective cohort trial; evidence: Class IV.

Restricted access

Ethan A. Winkler, Alex Lu, Ramin A. Morshed, John K. Yue, W. Caleb Rutledge, Jan-Karl Burkhardt, Arati B. Patel, Simon G. Ammanuel, Steve Braunstein, Christine K. Fox, Heather J. Fullerton, Helen Kim, Daniel Cooke, Steven W. Hetts, Michael T. Lawton, Adib A. Abla and Nalin Gupta

OBJECTIVE

Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) consist of dysplastic blood vessels with direct arteriovenous shunts that can hemorrhage spontaneously. In children, a higher lifetime hemorrhage risk must be balanced with treatment-related morbidity. The authors describe a collaborative, multimodal strategy resulting in effective and safe treatment of pediatric AVMs.

METHODS

A retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database was performed in children with treated and nontreated pediatric AVMs at the University of California, San Francisco, from 1998 to 2017. Inclusion criteria were age ≤ 18 years at time of diagnosis and an AVM confirmed by a catheter angiogram.

RESULTS

The authors evaluated 189 pediatric patients with AVMs over the study period, including 119 ruptured (63%) and 70 unruptured (37%) AVMs. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.6 ± 4.3 years. With respect to Spetzler-Martin (SM) grade, there were 38 (20.1%) grade I, 40 (21.2%) grade II, 62 (32.8%) grade III, 40 (21.2%) grade IV, and 9 (4.8%) grade V lesions. Six patients were managed conservatively, and 183 patients underwent treatment, including 120 resections, 82 stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and 37 endovascular embolizations. Forty-four of 49 (89.8%) high-grade AVMs (SM grade IV or V) were treated. Multiple treatment modalities were used in 29.5% of low-grade and 27.3% of high-grade AVMs. Complete angiographic obliteration was obtained in 73.4% of low-grade lesions (SM grade I–III) and in 45.2% of high-grade lesions. A periprocedural stroke occurred in a single patient (0.5%), and there was 1 treatment-related death. The mean clinical follow-up for the cohort was 4.1 ± 4.6 years, and 96.6% and 84.3% of patients neurologically improved or remained unchanged in the ruptured and unruptured AVM groups following treatment, respectively. There were 16 bleeding events following initiation of AVM treatment (annual rate: 0.02 events per person-year).

CONCLUSIONS

Coordinated multidisciplinary evaluation and individualized planning can result in safe and effective treatment of children with AVMs. In particular, it is possible to treat the majority of high-grade AVMs with an acceptable safety profile. Judicious use of multimodality therapy should be limited to appropriately selected patients after thorough team-based discussions to avoid additive morbidity. Future multicenter studies are required to better design predictive models to aid with patient selection for multimodal pediatric care, especially with high-grade AVMs.