Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Soheil Saadat x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Keyvan Davatgaran Taghipoor, Roya Habibi Arejan, Mohammad Reza Rasouli, Soheil Saadat, Mojgan Moghadam, Alexander R. Vaccaro and Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

Object

Pressure ulcers (PUs) are common complications in patients with complete spinal cord injury (SCI) or incomplete SCI in which sensory function is spared. Most studies analyzing associated factors of PU and SCI have been performed in cases of traumatic SCI and in just a few cases of nontraumatic SCI. This study was designed to look specifically at the differences in causative factors of PU in cases of traumatic and nontraumatic SCIs.

Methods

The authors performed a retrospective, cross-sectional study evaluating patients with complete and incomplete SCIs (American Spinal Injury Association Grades A and B) under the coverage of the financial, medicosocial, and rehabilitative support provided by the State Welfare Organization of Iran (SWOI). There were 3791 cases of traumatic SCI (63.2%) and 2110 cases of nontraumatic SCI (35.2%). For 94 patients (1.6%), sufficient data were not available.

Results

A PU was detected in 39.2% of all patients with an SCI (71.8% of those with traumatic SCI vs 28.2% of those with nontraumatic SCI). A univariate analysis showed a significant association between occupation, education, and the presence of PU in patients with a traumatic SCI (p < 0.05). This contrasted with nontraumatic SCI in which an association between PU and age was noted (p < 0.05).

Using logistic regression, traumatic cause, older age, an interval less than 1 year since the onset of SCI, male sex, and single status were found to significantly increase the risk of PU in all patients with an SCI. However, a higher education level had a preventive effect on PU.

Conclusions

This study revealed some risk factors for PU in the authors' setting. The authors' findings suggest a possible difference between the risk factors for PU in patients with both types of SCI. Further study on the pathoetiology of these differences is paramount in the future.

Restricted access

Soheil Saadat, Seyed Mohammad Ghodsi, Kourosh Holakouie Naieni, Kavous Firouznia, Mostafa Hosseini, Hamid Reza Kadkhodaie and Hossein Saidi

Object

The aim of this study was to develop a decision rule for physicians in developing countries to identify patients with minor head injury who will benefit from emergency brain CT scanning.

Methods

Three hundred eighteen patients with a history of blunt head trauma and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≥ 13 who had presented within 12 hours of trauma underwent nonenhanced brain CT and were included in this prospective study. Computed tomography findings that necessitated neurosurgical care (either observation or intervention) were considered as positive findings. Logistic regression was used to develop the decision rule.

Results

Computed tomography scans were always normal in patients < 65 years old who did not have an obvious head wound, a raccoon sign, vomiting, memory deficit, or a decrease in their GCS score. Patients with 1 major criterion (GCS score < 14, raccoon sign, failure to remember the impact, age > 65 years, or vomiting) or 2 minor criteria (wound at the scalp or GCS score < 15) had an abnormal CT scan in 13% of the cases.

Conclusions

The decision rule developed by the authors appears to be 100% sensitive and 46% specific for positive findings on brain CT and will, in developing countries, help clarify the decision to obtain scans.