Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 19 items for

  • Author or Editor: Shyamal Bir x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Shyamal C. Bir, Piyush Kalakoti, Christina Notarianni and Anil Nanda

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Dr. John Howship, a pioneering British surgeon, described the clinical features and pathophysiology of various surgical disorders of the human body. His critical contributions to pediatric neurosurgery came in 1816 when he first described the features of an important childhood condition following head trauma, what he referred to as parietal bone absorption. This condition as depicted by Dr. Howship was soon to be christened by later scholars as traumatic cephalhydrocele, traumatic meningocele, leptomeningeal cyst, meningocele spuria, fibrosing osteitis, cerebrocranial erosion, and growing skull fracture. Nevertheless, the basic features of the condition as observed by Dr. Howship were virtually identical to the characteristics of the above-mentioned disorders. This article describes the life and accomplishments of Dr. Howship and his contributions to the current understanding of growing skull fracture.

Full access

Shyamal C. Bir, Sudheer Ambekar, Sunil Kukreja and Anil Nanda

Julius Caesar Arantius is one of the pioneer anatomists and surgeons of the 16th century who discovered the different anatomical structures of the human body. One of his prominent discoveries is the hippocampus. At that time, Arantius originated the term hippocampus, from the Greek word for seahorse (hippos [“horse”] and kampos [“sea monster”]). Arantius published his description of the hippocampus in 1587, in the first chapter of his work titled De Humano Foetu Liber. Numerous nomenclatures of this structure, including “white silkworm,” “Ammon's horn,” and “ram's horn” were proposed by different scholars at that time. However, the term hippocampus has become the most widely used in the literature.

Free access

Shyamal C. Bir, Subhas Konar, Tanmoy Maiti, Anil Nanda and Bharat Guthikonda

OBJECTIVE

Spinal cord stimulators (SCSs) appear to be safe and efficacious for chronic intractable back pain. Although there are many reports on percutaneous SCSs, there are very few studies on outcomes of paddle lead SCSs. In addition, the predictors of requirement for SCS revision have not been well established. Here, the authors review the outcome of a case series and attempt to identify the predictors of SCS revisions.

METHODS

The clinical and radiological information of 141 patients with intractable chronic pain who underwent SCS implantation within the past 20 years was retrospectively reviewed. Paddle lead SCSs were used in this series. Statistical analysis was conducted using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional-hazards regression.

RESULTS

Among 141 cases, 90 (64%) did not require any revision after SCS implantations. Removal of the SCS was required in 14 patients. The average pain score was significantly reduced (preimplantation score of 8 vs postimplantation score of 1.38; p < 0.0001). Younger age, male sex, obesity, a preimplantation pain score ≥ 8, and the presence of neuromuscular pain were identified as predictors of the overall requirement for SCS revision. However, only a preimplantation pain score ≥ 8 was identified as a predictor of early failure of the SCS.

CONCLUSIONS

Implantation of a paddle lead SCS is a relatively less invasive, safe, and effective procedure for patients with intractable back pain. Revision of the procedure depends on many factors, including younger age, male sex, associated neuromuscular pain, and severity of the pain. Therefore, patients with these factors, for whom implantation of an SCS is planned, should be closely followed for the possible requirement for revision.

Full access

Subhas K. Konar, Shyamal C. Bir, Tanmoy K. Maiti and Anil Nanda

OBJECTIVE

The incidence of primary spinal cord glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in the pediatric age group is very rare. Only a few case series and case reports have been published in the literature; therefore, overall survival (OS) outcome and the as-yet poorly defined management options are not discussed in detail. The authors performed a cumulative survival analysis of all reported cases of pediatric spinal cord GBM to identify the predictive factors related to final survival outcome.

METHODS

A comprehensive search for relevant articles was performed on PubMed's electronic database MEDLINE for the period from 1950 to 2015 using the search words “malignant spinal cord tumor” and “spinal glioblastoma multiforme.” This study was limited to patients younger than 18 years of age. Survival rates for children with various tumor locations and treatments were collected from the published articles and analyzed.

RESULTS

After an extensive literature search, 29 articles met the study inclusion criteria. From the detailed information in these articles, the authors found 53 children eligible for the survival analysis. The majority (45%) of the children were more than 12 years old. Thirty-four percent of the cases were between 7 and 12 years of age, and 21% were younger than 7 years. In the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, children younger than 7 years of age had better survival (13 months) than the children older than 7 years (7–12 years: 10 months, > 12 years: 9 months; p = 0.01, log-rank test). Fifty-five percent of the children were female and 45% were male. A cervical tumor location (32%) was the most common, followed by thoracic (28.3%). Cervicothoracic (18.9%) and conus (18.8%) tumor locations shared the same percentage of cases. Cervical tumors had a worse outcome than tumors in other locations (p = 0.003, log-rank test). The most common presenting symptom was limb weakness (53%), followed by sensory disturbances (25%). Median OS was 10 months. The addition of adjuvant therapy (radiotherapy [RT] and/or chemotherapy [CT]) after surgery significantly improved OS (p = 0.01, log-rank test). Children who underwent gross-total resection and RT had better outcomes than those who underwent subtotal resection and RT (p = 0.04, log-rank test). Cerebrospinal fluid spread, hydrocephalus, brain metastasis, and spinal metastasis were not correlated with OS in primary spinal GBM.

CONCLUSIONS

Adjuvant therapy after surgery had a beneficial effect on overall outcome of spinal GBM in the pediatric age group. Gross-total resection followed by RT produced a better outcome than subtotal resection with RT. Further large-scale prospective study is required to establish the genetic and molecular factors related to OS in primary GBM of the spinal cord in pediatric patients.

Free access

Tanmoy K. Maiti, Shyamal C. Bir, Devi Prasad Patra, Piyush Kalakoti, Bharat Guthikonda and Anil Nanda

OBJECTIVE

Spinal meningiomas are benign tumors with a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological features at presentation. The authors analyzed multiple clinicoradiological factors to predict recurrence and functional outcome in a cohort with a mean follow-up of more than 4 years. The authors also discuss the results of clinical studies regarding spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years.

METHODS

The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological details of patients who underwent surgery for spinal tumors between 2001 and 2015 that were histopathologically confirmed as meningiomas. Demographic parameters, such as age, sex, race, and association with neurofibromatosis Type 2, were considered. Radiological parameters, such as tumor size, signal changes of spinal cord, spinal level, number of levels, location of tumor attachment, shape of tumor, and presence of dural tail/calcification, were noted. These factors were analyzed to predict recurrence and functional outcome. Furthermore, a pooled analysis was performed from 13 reports of spinal meningiomas in the last 15 years.

RESULTS

A total of 38 patients were included in this study. Male sex and tumors with radiological evidence of a dural tail were associated with an increased risk of recurrence at a mean follow-up of 51.2 months. Ventral or ventrolateral location, large tumors, T2 cord signal changes, and poor preoperative functional status were associated with poor functional outcome at 1-year follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS

Spine surgeons must be aware of the natural history and risk factors of spinal meningiomas to establish a prognosis for their patients.

Free access

Tanmoy Kumar Maiti, Subhas Konar, Shyamal Bir, Piyush Kalakoti, Papireddy Bollam and Anil Nanda

OBJECT

The difference in course and outcome of several neurodegenerative conditions and traumatic injuries of the nervous system points toward a possible role of genetic and environmental factors as prognostic markers. Apolipoprotein E (Apo-E), a key player in lipid metabolism, is recognized as one of the most powerful genetic risk factors for dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, the current understanding of APOE polymorphism in various neurological disorders is discussed.

METHODS

The English literature was searched for various studies describing the role of APOE polymorphism as a prognostic marker in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain injury. The wide ethnic distribution of APOE polymorphism was discussed, and the recent meta-analyses of role of APOE polymorphism in multiple diseases were analyzed and summarized in tabular form.

RESULTS

Results from the review of literature revealed that the distribution of APOE is varied in different ethnic populations. APOE polymorphism plays a significant role in pathogenesis of neurodegeneration, particularly in Alzheimer’s disease. APOE ε4 is considered a marker for poor prognosis in various diseases, but APOE ε2 rather than APOE ε4 has been associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related bleeding and sporadic Parkinson’s disease. The role of APOE polymorphism in various neurological diseases has not been conclusively elucidated.

CONCLUSIONS

Apo-E is a biomarker for various neurological and systemic diseases. Therefore, while analyzing the role of APOE polymorphism in neurological diseases, the interpretation should be done after adjusting all the confounding factors. A continuous quest to look for associations with various neurological diseases and wide knowledge of available literature are required to improve the understanding of the role of APOE polymorphism in these conditions and identify potential therapeutic targets.

Free access

Piyush Kalakoti, Richard D. Murray, Shyamal C. Bir, Osama Ahmed and Anil Nanda

With the advent of endovascular modalities, endovascular coiling has become a progressively more common method of addressing intracranial aneurysms. When despite coiling, an aneurysm continues to enlarge, open microsurgical clipping is a viable, though technically demanding option. We present a unique case of failed coiling of a giant ophthalmic region aneurysm, in which the aneurysm was successfully managed via open microsurgical approach. We highlight the unique challenges faced and demonstrate the surgical process in an operative video presentation.

The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/k2P4c4Lvq7g.

Free access

Piyush Kalakoti, Shyamal C. Bir, Richard D. Murray, Osama Ahmed and Anil Nanda

Broad-necked middle cerebral artery aneurysms present unique challenges for the vascular neurosurgeon, who must contend with smaller vessels and often a complex clipping strategy. Due to their superficial location, these lesions are still commonly selected for microsurgical clipping. We present a case of a 42-year-old woman with significant vascular disease with a right middle cerebral artery aneurysm. We discuss the key surgical steps, demonstrate the microsurgical dissection and intraoperative rupture encountered and the final clipping strategy, as well as the postoperative course in this operative video presentation.

The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/qZ2gvqz7XdQ.

Full access

Subhas K. Konar, Shyamal C. Bir, Tanmoy K. Maiti, Papireddy Bollam and Anil Nanda

Isadore Max Tarlov, an early neurosurgeon, made several important contributions to the field of spine surgery. He described sacral perineural cysts, now known as Tarlov cysts. Dr. Tarlov also introduced the knee-chest patient position to facilitate exposure and hemostasis in lumbar surgery. In addition, he developed the use of fibrin glue in nerve repair. His book on mechanisms of spinal compression was published in 1957. He published a book of essays titled Principles of Parsimony in Medical Practice that remains highly relevant in today's medical world.