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Qing-shuang Zhou, MM, Xu Sun, Xi Chen, Liang Xu, Bang-ping Qian, Ze-zhang Zhu, Bin Wang, and Yong Qiu

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate sagittal alignment and compensatory mechanisms in patients with monosegmental spondylolysis (mono_lysis) and multisegmental spondylolysis (multi_lysis).

METHODS

A total of 453 adult patients treated for symptomatic low-grade spondylolytic spondylolisthesis were retrospectively studied at a single center. Patients were divided into 2 subgroups, the mono_lysis group and the multi_lysis group, based on the number of spondylolysis segments. A total of 158 asymptomatic healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study as the control group. Radiographic parameters measured on standing sagittal radiographs and the ratios of L4–S1 segmental lordosis (SL) to lumbar lordosis (L4–S1 SL/LL) and pelvic tilt to pelvic incidence (PT/PI) were compared between all experimental groups.

RESULTS

There were 51 patients (11.3%) with a diagnosis of multi_lysis in the spondylolysis group. When compared with the control group, the spondylolysis group exhibited larger PI (p < 0.001), PT (p < 0.001), LL (p < 0.001), and L4–S1 SL (p = 0.025) and a smaller L4–S1 SL/LL ratio (p < 0.001). When analyzing the specific spondylolysis subgroups, there were no significant differences in PI, but the multi_lysis group had a higher L5 incidence (p = 0.004), PT (p = 0.018), and PT/PI ratio (p = 0.039). The multi_lysis group also had a smaller L4–S1 SL/LL ratio (p = 0.012) and greater sagittal vertical axis (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

A high-PI spinopelvic pattern was involved in the development of spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, and a larger L5 incidence might be associated with the occurrence of consecutive multi_lysis. Unlike patients with mono_lysis, individuals with multi_lysis were characterized by an anterior trunk, insufficiency of L4–S1 SL, and pelvic retroversion.

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Yu Shuang Tian, Di Zhong, Qing Qing Liu, Xiu Li Zhao, Hong Xue Sun, Jing Jin, Hai Ning Wang, and Guo Zhong Li

OBJECTIVE

Ischemic stroke remains a significant cause of death and disability in industrialized nations. Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) of the JAK2/STAT3 pathway play important roles in the downstream signal pathway regulation of ischemic stroke–related inflammatory neuronal damage. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as major regulators in cerebral ischemic injury; therefore, the authors aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism between miRNAs and ischemic stroke, which may provide potential therapeutic targets for ischemic stroke.

METHODS

The JAK2- and JAK3-related miRNA (miR-135, miR-216a, and miR-433) expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot analysis in both oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)–treated primary cultured neuronal cells and mouse brain with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)–induced ischemic stroke. The miR-135, miR-216a, and miR-433 were determined by bioinformatics analysis that may target JAK2, and miR-216a was further confirmed by 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) dual-luciferase assay. The study further detected cell apoptosis, the level of lactate dehydrogenase, and inflammatory mediators (inducible nitric oxide synthase [iNOS], matrix metalloproteinase–9 [MMP-9], tumor necrosis factor–α [TNF-α], and interleukin-1β [IL-1β]) after cells were transfected with miR-NC (miRNA negative control) or miR-216a mimics and subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) damage with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, annexin V–FITC/PI, Western blots, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection. Furthermore, neurological deficit detection and neurological behavior grading were performed to determine the infarction area and neurological deficits.

RESULTS

JAK2 showed its highest level while miR-216a showed its lowest level at day 1 after ischemic reperfusion. However, miR-135 and miR-433 had no obvious change during the process. The luciferase assay data further confirmed that miR-216a can directly target the 3′UTR of JAK2, and overexpression of miR-216a repressed JAK2 protein levels in OGD/R-treated neuronal cells as well as in the MCAO model ischemic region. In addition, overexpression of miR-216a mitigated cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, which was consistent with the effect of knockdown of JAK2. Furthermore, the study found that miR-216a obviously inhibited the inflammatory mediators after OGD/R, including inflammatory enzymes (iNOS and MMP-9) and cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β). Upregulating miR-216a levels reduced ischemic infarction and improved neurological deficit.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that upregulation of miR-216a, which targets JAK2, could induce neuroprotection against ischemic injury in vitro and in vivo, which provides a potential therapeutic target for ischemic stroke.

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Nathan A. Shlobin, Andrew Wang, H. Westley Phillips, Han Yan, George M. Ibrahim, Lior M. Elkaim, Shuang Wang, Xiaoyan Liu, Lixin Cai, Dang K. Nguyen, Aria Fallah, and Alexander G. Weil

OBJECTIVE

The prevalence of long-term postoperative sensorimotor deficits in children undergoing perirolandic resective epilepsy surgery is unclear. The risk of developing these deficits must be weighed against the potential reduction in seizure frequency after surgery. In this study, the authors investigated the prevalence of sensorimotor deficits after resective surgery at ≥ 1 year postoperatively.

METHODS

A systematic review and individual patient data meta-analysis was conducted using PubMed, Embase, and Scopus databases. Subgroups of patients were identified and categorized according to their outcomes as follows: group A patients were denoted as seizure free with no postoperative sensorimotor deficits; group B patients experienced seizure recurrence with no deficit; group C patients were seizure free with deficits; and group D patients were not seizure free and with deficits. Rates of sensory deficits were examined in patients undergoing postcentral gyrus resection, and rates of motor deficits were aggregated in patients undergoing precentral gyrus resection.

RESULTS

Of 797 articles resulting from the database searches, 6 articles including 164 pediatric patients at a mean age of 7.7 ± 5.2 years with resection for drug-resistant perirolandic epilepsy were included in the study. Seizure freedom was observed in 118 (72.9%) patients at a mean follow-up of 3.4 ± 1.8 years. In total, 109 (66.5%) patients did not develop sensorimotor deficits at last follow-up, while 55 (33.5%) had permanent deficits. Ten (14.3%) of 70 patients with postcentral gyrus resection had permanent sensory deficits. Of the postcentral gyrus resection patients, 41 (58.6%) patients were included in group A, 19 (27.1%) in group B, 7 (10.0%) in group C, and 3 (4.3%) in group D. Forty (37.7%) of 106 patients with precentral resections had permanent motor deficits. Of the precentral gyrus resection patients, 50 (47.2%) patients were in group A, 16 (15.1%) in group B, 24 (22.6%) in group C, and 16 (15.1%) in group D. Patients without focal cortical dysplasia were more likely to have permanent motor deficits relative to those with focal cortical dysplasia in the precentral surgery cohort (p = 0.02).

CONCLUSIONS

In total, 58.6% of patients were seizure free without deficit, 27.1% were not seizure free and without deficit, 10.0% were seizure free but with deficit, and 4.3% were not seizure free and with deficit. Future studies with functional and quality-of-life data, particularly for patients who experience seizure recurrence with no deficits (as in group B in the present study) and those who are seizure free with deficits (as in group C) after treatment, are necessary to guide surgical decision-making.

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Shan Wang, Yingying Tang, Thandar Aung, Cong Chen, Masaya Katagiri, Stephen E. Jones, Richard A. Prayson, Balu Krishnan, Jorge A. Gonzalez-Martinez, Richard C. Burgess, Imad M. Najm, Andreas V. Alexopoulos, Shuang Wang, Meiping Ding, and Zhong Irene Wang

OBJECTIVE

Presurgical evaluation of patients with operculoinsular epilepsy and negative MRI presents major challenges. Here the authors examined the yield of noninvasive modalities such as voxel-based morphometric MRI postprocessing, FDG-PET, subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) in a cohort of patients with operculoinsular epilepsy and negative MRI.

METHODS

Twenty-two MRI-negative patients were included who had focal ictal onset from the operculoinsular cortex on intracranial EEG, and underwent focal resection limited to the operculoinsular cortex. MRI postprocessing was applied to presurgical T1-weighted volumetric MRI using a morphometric analysis program (MAP). Individual and combined localization yields of MAP, FDG-PET, MEG, and SISCOM were compared with the ictal onset location on intracranial EEG. Seizure outcomes were reported at 1 year and 2 years (when available) using the Engel classification.

RESULTS

Ten patients (45.5%, 10/22) had operculoinsular abnormalities on MAP; 5 (23.8%, 5/21) had operculoinsular hypometabolism on FDG-PET; 4 (26.7%, 4/15) had operculoinsular hyperperfusion on SISCOM; and 6 (30.0%, 6/20) had an MEG cluster (3 tight, 3 loose) within the operculoinsular cortex. The highest yield of a 2-test combination was 59.1%, seen with MAP and SISCOM, followed by 54.5% with MAP and FDG-PET, and also 54.5% with MAP and MEG. The highest yield of a 3-test combination was 68.2%, seen with MAP, MEG, and SISCOM. The yield of the 4-test combination remained at 68.2%. When all other tests were negative or nonlocalizing, unique information was provided by MAP in 5, MEG in 1, SISCOM in 2, and FDG-PET in none of the patients. One-year follow-up was available in all patients, and showed 11 Engel class IA, 4 class IB, 4 class II, and 3 class III/IV. Two-year follow-up was available in 19 patients, and showed 9 class IA, 3 class IB, 1 class ID, 3 class II, and 3 class III/IV.

CONCLUSIONS

This study highlights the individual and combined values of multiple noninvasive modalities for the evaluation of nonlesional operculoinsular epilepsy. The 3-test combination of MAP, MEG, and SISCOM represented structural, interictal, and ictal localization information, and constituted the highest yield. MAP showed the highest yield of unique information when other tests were negative or nonlocalizing.