Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Shu-Ling Chong x
  • Refine by Access: all x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Vigil James, Shu-Ling Chong, Shanti S. Shetty, and Gene Y. Ong

OBJECTIVE

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of long-term disability and death in children and adolescents globally. Long-term adverse outcomes, including physical, cognitive, and behavioral sequelae, have been reported after TBI in a significant number of pediatric patients. In this study the authors sought to investigate the epidemiology of TBI-associated coagulopathy and its association with mortality and poor neurological outcome in a pediatric population with isolated moderate to severe blunt head injury treated at the authors’ institution.

METHODS

This retrospective study was conducted in the children’s emergency department between January 2010 and December 2016. Children < 18 years old who presented with isolated moderate to severe blunt head injury were included in the study. The authors collected data on patient demographics, clinical presentation, and TBI management. Outcomes studied were death and poor neurological outcome defined by a score of < 7 (death, moderate to severe neurological disability) at 6 months postinjury on the pediatric version of the Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended (GOS-E Peds).

RESULTS

In 155 pediatric patients who presented with isolated moderate to severe blunt head injury, early coagulopathy was observed in 33 (21.3%) patients during the initial blood investigations done in the emergency department. The mean (SD) age of the study group was 7.03 (5.08) years and the predominant mechanism of injury was fall from height (65.2%). The median Abbreviated Injury Scale of the head (AIS head) score was 4 and the median GCS score was 13 (IQR 12–15). TBI-associated coagulopathy was independently associated with GOS-E Peds score < 7 (p = 0.02, adjusted OR 6.07, 95% CI 1.32–27.83). The overall mortality rate was 5.8%. After adjusting for confounders, only AIS head score and hypotension at triage remained significantly associated with TBI-associated coagulopathy.

CONCLUSIONS

TBI-associated coagulopathy was independently associated with GOS-E Peds score < 7 at 6 months postinjury. Larger prospective studies are needed to investigate the use of TBI-associated coagulopathy to prognosticate these critical clinical outcomes.

Open access

Shu-Ling Chong, Suyun Qian, Sarah Hui Wen Yao, John Carson Allen, Hongxing Dang, Lawrence C. N. Chan, Meixiu Ming, Chin Seng Gan, Jacqueline S. M. Ong, Hiroshi Kurosawa, and Jan Hau Lee

OBJECTIVE

Early posttraumatic seizures (EPTSs) in children after traumatic brain injury (TBI) increase metabolic stress on the injured brain. The authors sought to study the demographic and radiographic predictors for EPTS, and to investigate the association between EPTS and death, and between EPTS and poor functional outcomes among children with moderate to severe TBI in Asia.

METHODS

A secondary analysis of a retrospective TBI cohort among participating centers of the Pediatric Acute & Critical Care Medicine Asian Network was performed. Children < 16 years of age with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≤ 13 who were admitted to pediatric intensive care units between January 2014 and October 2017 were included. Logistic regression analysis was performed to study risk factors for EPTS and to investigate the association between EPTS and death, and between EPTS and poor functional outcomes. Poor functional outcomes were defined as moderate disability, severe disability, and coma as defined by the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category scale.

RESULTS

Overall, 313 children were analyzed, with a median age of 4.3 years (IQR 1.8–8.9 years); 162 children (51.8%) had severe TBI (GCS score < 8), and 76 children (24.3%) had EPTS. After adjusting for age, sex, and the presence of nonaccidental trauma (NAT), only younger age was significantly associated with EPTS (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.85, 95% CI 0.78–0.92; p < 0.001). Forty-nine children (15.6%) in the cohort died, and 87 (32.9%) of the 264 surviving patients had poor functional outcomes. EPTS did not increase the risk of death. After adjusting for age, sex, TBI due to NAT, multiple traumas, and a GCS score < 8, the presence of EPTS was associated with poor functional outcomes (aOR 2.08, 95% CI 1.05–4.10; p = 0.036).

CONCLUSIONS

EPTSs were common among children with moderate to severe TBI in Asia and were associated with poor functional outcomes among children who survived TBI.