Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Shih-Hung Yang x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Cheng-Yo Yen, Shih-Chieh Yang, Hung-Shu Chen and Yuan-Kun Tu

During L3–5 instrumented spinal surgery for degenerative spondylolisthesis in a 75-year-old woman, the right L-3 pedicle screw was accidentally pushed into the retroperitoneum and then migrated to the inferior vena cava (IVC). The patient was transferred to the surgical intensive care unit, and after careful discussion with cardiology specialists, a minimally invasive endovascular technique was used to remove the migrating pedicle screw within the IVC and thus salvage this critical case.

Pedicle screw instrumentation is an effective procedure, but not risk free. Every detail should be scrutinized during surgery, even instrument construction. A minimally invasive endovascular technique should be considered in this patient population.

Free access

Cheng-Chia Lee, David Hung-Chi Pan, Wen-Yuh Chung, Kang-Du Liu, Huai-Che Yang, Hsiu-Mei Wu, Wan-Yuo Guo and Yang-Hsin Shih

Object

The authors retrospectively reviewed the efficacy and safety of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) in patients with brainstem cavernous malformations (CMs). The CMs had bled repeatedly and placed the patients at high risk with respect to surgical intervention.

Methods

Between 1993 and 2010, 49 patients with symptomatic CMs were treated by GKS. The mean age in these patients was 37.8 years, and the predominant sex was female (59.2%). All 49 patients experienced at least 2 instances of repeated bleeding before GKS; these hemorrhages caused neurological deficits including cranial nerve deficits, hemiparesis, hemisensory deficits, spasticity, chorea or athetosis, and consciousness disturbance.

Results

The mean size of the CMs at the time of GKS was 3.2 cm3 (range 0.1–14.6 cm3). The mean radiation dose directed to the lesion was 11 Gy with an isodose level at 60.0%. The mean clinical and imaging follow-up time was 40.6 months (range 1.0–150.7 months). Forty-five patients participated in regularly scheduled follow-up. Twenty-nine patients (59.2%) were followed up for > 2 years, and 16 (32.7%) were followed up for < 2 years. The pre-GKS annual hemorrhage rate was 31.3% (69 symptomatic hemorrhages during a total of 220.3 patient-years). After GKS, 3 episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage were observed within the first 2 years of follow-up (4.29% annual hemorrhage rate), and 3 episodes of symptomatic hemorrhage were observed after the first 2 years of follow-up (3.64% annual hemorrhage rate). In this study of 49 patients, symptomatic radiation-induced complications developed in only 2 patients (4.1%; cyst formation in 1 patient and perifocal edema with neurological deficits in the other patient). There were no deaths in this group.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife surgery is effective in reducing the rate of recurrent hemorrhage. In the authors' experience, it was possible to control bleeding using a low-dose treatment. In addition, there were few symptomatic radiation-induced complications. As a result, the authors believe that GKS is a good alternative treatment for brainstem CMs.

Restricted access

Wen-Yuh Chung, David Hung-Chi Pan, Cheng-Chia Lee, Hsiu-Mei Wu, Kang-Du Liu, Yu-Shu Yen, Wan-Yuo Guo, Cheng-Ying Shiau and Yang-Hsin Shih

Object

Although radiosurgery has been well accepted as a treatment for small- to medium-sized vestibular schwannomas (VSs), its application in the treatment of large VSs remains controversial because of unfavorable effects such as tumor swelling and potential compression of the brainstem. The authors present a retrospective study spanning 17 years, during which 21 patients underwent Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for large VSs. Long-term outcomes are reported, and possible factors affecting tumor responses to GKS are analyzed.

Methods

Five hundred thirteen patients harboring VSs underwent GKS between March 1993 and October 2009. A large VS was defined as a tumor whose diameter was > 3 cm. This paper focuses on 21 patients who harbored large VSs ranging in volume from 12.7 to 25.2 cm3 (mean 17.3 cm3) and were treated by GKS. Fourteen of these patients had undergone 1 or more craniotomies previously to remove the tumor. Seven patients underwent GKS alone because of patient preference or a poor clinical condition that precluded microsurgery with general anesthesia. The mean radiation dose directed to the tumor ranged from 15 to 17.5 Gy. The mean radiation dose prescribed to the tumor margin was 11.9 Gy (range 11–14 Gy). The mean follow-up period was 66 months (range 12–155 months), and the median follow-up period was 53 months.

Results

The tumor control rate was 90.5% (19 of 21 lesions). No deterioration in facial nerve or trigeminal nerve function was noted. Disturbances in balance (some temporary) occurred in 5 patients. Three of the 21 patients developed initial tumor swelling, which required minor surgical interventions, including aspiration using an Ommaya reservoir or placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. All 3 patients recovered satisfactorily after aspiration of an enlarging cyst or ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement. There was no significant correlation between tumor control and the following factors: patient age or sex, tumor volume, radiation dose, previous operation, presence of brainstem compression, petrous bone invasion, T2 signal ratio between tumor and brainstem, and presence of a cyst. However, there was a significant correlation between the T2 signal ratio between tumor and brainstem and the duration of tumor swelling (p = 0.003).

Conclusions

Treatment of large VSs remains a challenge to neurosurgeons regardless of whether they perform microsurgery or radiosurgery. Control of tumor growth and preservation of neurological function are the main goals of treatment. Although delayed microsurgery was required in 2 patients (9.5%), the satisfactory tumor control rate and excellent preservation of facial and trigeminal nerve function are the great advantages of radiosurgery. Radiosurgery is not only a practical treatment for patients with small- to medium-sized VSs, but it is also an excellent tool for treating larger tumors up to 25 cm3. In selected cases, radiosurgery plays an important role in treating large VSs with satisfactory results.

Restricted access

Tzu-Ming Yang, Wei-Che Lin, Wen-Neng Chang, Jih-Tsun Ho, Hung-Chen Wang, Nai-Wen Tsai, Yi-Ting Shih and Cheng-Hsien Lu

Object

Seizures are an important neurological complication of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A better understanding of the risk factors of seizures following ICH is needed to predict which patients will require treatment.

Methods

Two hundred and forty-three adult patients were enrolled in this 1-year retrospective study. Multiple logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between baseline clinical factors and the presence or absence of seizure during the study period.

Results

Seizures occurred in 20 patients with ICH, including acute symptomatic seizures in 9 and unprovoked seizures in 11. None progressed to status epilepticus during hospitalization. After a minimum 3-year follow-up period, the mean Glasgow Outcome Scale score was 3.8 ± 1.1 for patients who had had seizures and 3.5 ± 1.3 for those who had not. The multiple logistic regression model demonstrated that the mean ICH volume was independently associated with seizures, and any increase of 1 mm3 in ICH volume increased the seizure rate by 2.7%.

Conclusions

Higher mean ICH volumes at presentation were predictive of seizure, and the presence of late seizures was predictive of developing epilepsy. Most seizures occurred within 2 years of spontaneous ICH over a minimum of 3 years of follow-up.

Restricted access

Shin-Joe Yeh, Sung-Chun Tang, Li-Kai Tsai, Chung-Wei Lee, Ya-Fang Chen, Hon-Man Liu, Shih-Hung Yang, Yu-Lin Hsieh, Meng-Fai Kuo and Jiann-Shing Jeng

OBJECTIVE

Pediatric and adult patients with moyamoya disease experience similar clinical benefits from indirect revascularization surgeries, but there are still debates about age-related angiographic differences of the collaterals established after surgery. The goal of this study was to assess age-related differences on ultrasonography before and after indirect revascularization surgeries in moyamoya patients, focusing on some ultrasonographic parameters known to be correlated with the collaterals supplied by the external carotid artery (ECA).

METHODS

The authors prospectively included moyamoya patients (50 and 26 hemispheres in pediatric and adult patients, respectively) who would undergo indirect revascularization surgery. Before surgery and at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery, the patients underwent ultrasonographic examinations. The ultrasonographic parameters included peak-systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), resistance index (RI), and flow volume (FV) measured in the ECA, superficial temporal artery (STA), and internal carotid artery on the operated side. The mean values, absolute changes, and percentage changes of these parameters were compared between the pediatric and adult patients. Logistic regression analysis was used to clarify the determinants affecting postoperative EDV changes in the STA.

RESULTS

Before surgery, the adult patients had mean higher EDV and lower RI in the STA and ECA than the pediatric group (all p < 0.05). After surgery, the pediatric patients had greater changes (absolute and percentage changes) in the PSV, EDV, RI, and FV in the STA and ECA (all p < 0.05). The factors affecting postoperative EDV changes in the STA at 6 months were age (p = 0.006) and size of the revascularization area (i.e., revascularization in more than the temporal region vs within the temporal region; p = 0.009). Pediatric patients who received revascularization procedures in more than the temporal region had higher velocities (PSV and EDV) in the STA than those who received revascularization within the temporal region (p < 0.05 at 1–6 months), but such differences were not observed in the adult group.

CONCLUSIONS

The greater changes of these parameters in the STA and ECA in pediatric patients than in adults after indirect revascularization surgeries indicated that pediatric patients might have a greater increase of collaterals postoperatively than adults. Pediatric patients who undergo revascularization in more than the temporal region might have more collaterals than those who undergo revascularization within the temporal region.

Full access

Chin-Chu Ko, Hsiao-Wen Tsai, Wen-Cheng Huang, Jau-Ching Wu, Yu-Chun Chen, Yang-Hsin Shih, Hung-Chieh Chen, Ching-Lan Wu and Henrich Cheng

Object

Dynamic stabilization systems are used to stabilize degenerative lumbar spondylosis. Loosening of the pedicle screws in such nonfusion implants is predictable. This retrospective study evaluated the incidence of screw loosening and its effect on clinical outcomes.

Methods

Charts, radiographic films, and medical records of 71 consecutive patients who underwent decompression using Dynesys dynamic stabilization for 1- or 2-level lumbar spondylosis were reviewed. Radiographic films were evaluated and compared to detect screw loosening. A visual analog scale (VAS) for back pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used for measuring clinical outcome. Statistical analysis was conducted using the chisquare test and Student t-test.

Results

The 71 patients in the study sample had a mean age of 59.2 ± 11.65 years (range 23–80 years), with slight female predominance (39 women, 32 men). The mean follow-up duration was 16.6 months (range 8–29 months). There were loose screws in 14 of 71 patients (19.7%), for a rate of 4.6% per screw (17 of 368 screws). Most screw loosening occurred in patients ≥ 55 years old (13 of 14 patients) although age and sex had no effect on screw loosening (p = 0.233 and 0.109, respectively). Both the loose screw and solid screw groups experienced significant improvement after the surgery in VAS and ODI scores. On the VAS, scores improved from 5.9 ± 2.99 to 2.1 ± 2.14 in the loose screw group (p = 0.003), and from 5.7 ± 3.45 to 2.9 ± 2.68 in the solid screw group (p < 0.001). For the ODI scale, scores improved from 43.5 ± 16.78% to 28.0 ± 18.18% (p = 0.006) in the loose screw group, and from 52.1 ± 20.92% to 24.6 ± 19.78% (p < 0.001) in the solid screw group. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups (p = 0.334 for VAS, p = 0.567 for ODI).

Conclusions

The preliminary study of this pedicle-based dynamic stabilization device for 1- and 2-level lumbar spondylosis shows radiographic evidence of screw loosening in 19.7% of patients and 4.6% of screws. Nonetheless, the loosening of screws has no adverse effect on clinical improvement.