Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author or Editor: Shi-zhou Zhao x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Restricted access

Shi-zhou Zhao, Bang-ping Qian, Ji-chen Huang, Mu Qiao, Bin Wang, and Yong Qiu

OBJECTIVE

Both unchanged upper cervical lordosis combined with decreased lower cervical lordosis and decreased upper cervical lordosis combined with decreased lower cervical lordosis have been reported to occur after correction surgery for adult spinal deformity. However, variations in cervical alignment after correction surgery in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) have not been investigated. The current study aimed to investigate the variations in cervical alignment following the correction surgery in AS patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis.

METHODS

Patients with AS who underwent pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) for thoracolumbar kyphosis from June 2016 to June 2019 with a minimum of 1-year follow-up were reviewed. Patients were grouped according to the presence (ossified group) and absence (non-ossified group) of total ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) in the lower cervical spine. Radiographic parameters, including thoracolumbar, craniocervical, and global radiographic parameters, were measured on lateral sitting EOS images.

RESULTS

Thirty-two patients (27 males and 5 females) with a mean follow-up of 1.5 years were identified. There were 21 patients in the non-ossified group and 11 patients in the ossified group. After PSO, both groups showed a decrease in the occiput–C7 angle (p < 0.001 for both). In the non-ossified group, the C2–7 angle decreased significantly (p < 0.001), while the occiput–C2 angle remained unchanged (p = 0.570). In the ossified group, the occiput–C2 angle decreased significantly (p < 0.001), while C2–7 angle remained unchanged (p = 0.311). In addition, the change in occiput–C2 was correlated with the osteotomy angle in the ossified group (R = 0.776, p = 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS

The variation patterns of cervical alignment following correction surgery for AS-related thoracolumbar kyphosis were different based on patients with or without total ossification of ALL in the lower cervical spine. When planning PSO for patients in the ossified group, restoration of the physiological upper cervical lordosis angle could be achieved by adjusting the osteotomy angle.

Full access

Lu Zhao, Xiaoming Wu, Yu Si, Zhipeng Yao, Zengxiang Dong, Valerie A. Novakovic, Li Guo, Dongxia Tong, He Chen, Yayan Bi, Junjie Kou, Huaizhang Shi, Ye Tian, Shaoshan Hu, Jin Zhou, and Jialan Shi

OBJECTIVE

Phosphatidylserine (PS) is a major component of the inner leaflet of membrane bilayers. During cell activation or apoptosis, PS is externalized to the outer membrane, providing an important physiological signal necessary for the release of the microparticles (MPs) that are generated through the budding of cellular membranes. MPs express PS and membrane antigens that reflect their cellular origin. PS exposure on the cell surface and the release of MPs provide binding sites for factor Xa and prothrombinase complexes that promote thrombin formation. Relatively little is known about the role of PS exposure on blood cells and MPs in patients with internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis who have undergone carotid artery stenting (CAS). The authors aimed to investigate the extent of PS exposure on blood cells and MPs and to define its role in procoagulant activity (PCA) in the 7 days following CAS.

METHODS

The study included patients with ICA stenosis who had undergone CAS (n = 70), matched patients who had undergone catheter angiography only (n = 30), and healthy controls (n = 30). Blood samples were collected from all patients just before the procedure after an overnight fast and at 2, 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and 7 days after the CAS procedure. Blood was collected from healthy controls after an overnight fast. Phosphatidylserine-positive (PS+) MPs and blood cells were analyzed by flow cytometry, while PCA was assessed with clotting time analysis, purified coagulation complex assays, and fibrin formation assays.

RESULTS

The authors found that levels of PS+ blood cells and PS+ blood cell–derived MPs (platelets and platelet-derived MPs [PMPs], neutrophils and neutrophil-derived MPs [NMPs], monocytes and monocyte-derived MPs [MMPs], erythrocytes and erythrocyte-derived MPs [RMPs], and endothelial cells and endothelial cell–derived MPs [EMPs]) were increased in the 7 days following the CAS procedure. Specifically, elevation of PS exposure on platelets/PMPs, neutrophils/NMPs, and monocytes/MMPs was detected within 2 hours of CAS, whereas PS exposure was delayed on erythrocytes/RMPs and EMPs, with an increase detected 24 hours after CAS. In addition, PS+ platelets/PMPs peaked at 2 hours, while PS+ neutrophils/NMPs, monocytes/MMPs, and erythrocytes/RMPs peaked at 48 hours. After their peak, all persisted at levels above baseline for 7 days post-CAS. Moreover, the level of PS+ blood cells/MPs was correlated with shortened coagulation time and significantly increased intrinsic and extrinsic Xase, thrombin generation, and fibrin formation. Pretreatment of blood cells with lactadherin at their peak time point after CAS blocked PS, resulting in prolonged coagulation times, decreased procoagulant enzyme activation, and fibrin production.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this study suggest that increased exposure of PS on blood cells and MPs may contribute to enhanced PCA in patients with ICA stenosis who have undergone CAS, explaining the risk of perioperative thromboembolic complications in these patients. PS on blood cells and MPs may serve as an important biomarker for predicting, and as a pivotal target for monitoring and treating, acute postoperative complications after CAS.

■ CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE Type of question: association; study design: prospective cohort trial; evidence: Class I.

Full access

Abudumijiti Aibaidula, Wang Zhao, Jin-song Wu, Hong Chen, Zhi-feng Shi, Lu-lu Zheng, Ying Mao, Liang-fu Zhou, and Guo-dong Sui

OBJECT

Conventional methods for isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) detection, such as DNA sequencing and immunohistochemistry, are time- and labor-consuming and cannot be applied for intraoperative analysis. To develop a new approach for rapid analysis of IDH1 mutation from tiny tumor samples, this study used microfluidics as a method for IDH1 mutation detection.

METHODS

Forty-seven glioma tumor samples were used; IDH1 mutation status was investigated by immunohistochemistry and DNA sequencing. The microfluidic device was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane following standard soft lithography. The immunoanalysis was conducted in the microfluidic chip. Fluorescence images of the on-chip microcolumn taken by the charge-coupled device camera were collected as the analytical results readout. Fluorescence signals were analyzed by NIS-Elements software to gather detailed information about the IDH1 concentration in the tissue samples.

RESULTS

DNA sequencing identified IDH1 R132H mutation in 33 of 47 tumor samples. The fluorescence signal for IDH1-mutant samples was 5.49 ± 1.87 compared with 3.90 ± 1.33 for wild type (p = 0.005). Thus, microfluidics was capable of distinguishing IDH1-mutant tumor samples from wild-type samples. When the cutoff value was 4.11, the sensitivity of microfluidics was 87.9% and the specificity was 64.3%.

CONCLUSIONS

This new approach was capable of analyzing IDH1 mutation status of tiny tissue samples within 30 minutes using intraoperative microsampling. This approach might also be applied for rapid pathological diagnosis of diffuse gliomas, thus guiding personalized resection.