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Chinmaya Dash, Kanwaljeet Garg and Shashank S. Kale

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Govindaraju Lakshmi Prasad, Manish Singh Sharma, Shashank S. Kale, Deepak Agrawal, Manmohan Singh and Bhawani Shankar Sharma

OBJECTIVE

Of the intracranial schwannomas, those arising from the vestibular nerves are the most common. Abducens nerve (AN) schwannomas are very rare, and there is limited literature on their optimal management. Therapeutic options include surgery and/or stereotactic radiosurgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) in these sixth cranial nerve (CN) schwannomas.

METHODS

The authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients who had undergone GKRS for intracranial tumors at their institute in the period from 2003 to 2010. Inclusion criteria were as follows: isolated AN paresis on presentation, a lesion along the course of the sixth CN, and imaging features characteristic of a schwannoma. Patients with other CN deficits and neurofibromatosis Type 2 were excluded. Symptomatic improvement was defined as the resolution of or an improvement in diplopia noted on a subjective basis or as an improvement in lateral eyeball excursion noted objectively on follow-up. A reduction in tumor volume by at least 20%, as noted by comparing the pre- and post-GKRS images, was deemed significant.

RESULTS

Six patients with a mean age of 37.1 years (range 17–55 years) underwent primary GKRS. There were 2 prepontine cistern, 3 cavernous sinus, and 1 cisterno-cavernous tumor. The mean duration of symptoms was 6.1 months (range 3–12 months). The mean tumor volume was 3.3 cm3 (range 1.5–4.8 cm3). The mean tumor margin radiation dose was 12.5 Gy (range 12–14 Gy), while the median margin dose was 12 Gy (50% isodose line). The median number of isocenters used was 5 (range 4–8). The brainstem received an average 8.35-Gy radiation dosage (range 5.5–11 Gy). The mean follow-up duration was 44.3 months (range 24–78 months). Symptoms remained stable in 1 patient, improved in 3, and resolved in 2 (total improvement 83%). Magnetic resonance imaging at the last follow-up showed a stable tumor size in 3 patients (50%) and a reduction in the other 3. Thus, the tumor control rate achieved was 100%. No new CN deficits were noted.

CONCLUSIONS

Abducens nerve schwannomas are rare intracranial tumors. They can be cavernous, cisternal, or cisterno-cavernous in location. Excellent tumor control rates and symptomatic improvement can be achieved with GKRS, which appears to be a safe and effective, minimally invasive modality for the treatment of such lesions. Therefore, it is reasonable to consider GKRS as the initial treatment of choice for this rare pathology. Long-term follow-up will be essential for further recommendations.

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Manish Kumar Kasliwal, Shashank Sharad Kale, Aditya Gupta, Narayanam Anantha Sai Kiran, Manish Singh Sharma, Bhawani Shanker Sharma and Ashok K. Mahapatra

Object

Although the effects of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) on the risk of hemorrhage are poorly understood, a certain subset of patients does suffer bleeding after GKS. This study was undertaken to analyze the outcome of patients sustaining hemorrhage after GKS; it is the most feared complication of radiosurgical management of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Methods

Between May 1997 and June 2006, 494 cerebral AVMs in 489 patients were treated using a Leksell Gamma Knife Model B, and follow-up evaluations were conducted until June 2007 at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. Fourteen patients who sustained a hemorrhage after GKS formed the study group. In most of these patients conservative management was chosen.

Results

The mortality rate was 0% and there was a 7% risk of sustaining a severe deficit following rebleeding after GKS. None of the patients sustained rebleeding after complete obliteration. Patients with Spetzler-Martin Grade III or less had increased chances of hemorrhage after GKS (p < 0.002). The presence of deep venous drainage, aneurysm, venous hypertension, or periventricular location on angiography was common in patients with hemorrhage after GKS.

Conclusions

The risk of hemorrhage that remains following GKS for cerebral AVMs is highest in the 1st year after treatment. The present study showed a relatively good outcome even in cases with hemorrhage following GKS, with no deaths and minimal morbidity, further substantiating the safety and efficacy of the procedure.

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Aanchal Kakkar, Mehar C. Sharma, Nishant Goyal, Chitra Sarkar, Vaishali Suri, Ajay Garg, Shashank S. Kale and Ashish Suri

Meningeal fibromas are rare intracranial tumors that mimic meningiomas radiologically as well as histologically. The authors report 2 cases of meningeal fibroma with detailed clinical, radiological, histopathological, and immunohistochemical features, and discuss the differential diagnosis of this entity. Knowledge of this rare tumor is essential for pathologists to be able distinguish it from more common meningeal tumors, especially in younger patients. This knowledge is also essential for neurosurgeons, as incomplete resection may lead to tumor recurrence, and such patients require close follow-up.

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Narayanam Anantha Sai Kiran, Shashank Sharad Kale, Sandeep Vaishya, Manish Kumar Kasliwal, Aditya Gupta, Manish Singh Sharma, Bhavani Shankar Sharma and Ashok Kumar Mahapatra

Object

This retrospective study was designed to study the outcome in children with intracranial arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS).

Methods

One hundred and forty-two children were treated with GKS at the authors' institution between April 1997 and March 2006; of these, 103 patients with a mean follow-up of 26.4 months (range 6–96 months) were included. The mean age at presentation was 13.9 years (range 3–18 years). Eighty-six (83%) patients presented with hemorrhage. In 57 children the AVMs were Spetzler–Martin Grade I or II, and in 46 the AVMs were Grades III, IV, or V. The mean volume of the AVMs was 2.4 ml (range 0.04–23.3 ml). The mean marginal dose administered was 24.4 Gy (range 15–27 Gy). Follow-up angiography was advised at 2 years after GKS and yearly thereafter. In patients with residual AVMs, follow-up angiography was advised yearly until 4 years after GKS. If residual AVM was present, even on a follow-up angiogram obtained 4 years postsurgery, the GKS was considered a failure.

Results

Complete obliteration of the AVM was documented in 34 (87%) of the 39 patients with complete angiographic follow-up. The 3- and 4-year actuarial rates of nidus obliteration were 66 and 86% respectively. Three patients (2.9%) experienced bleeding during the latency period, and symptomatic radiation-induced edema was noted in four patients (3.8%). A significantly higher incidence of radiation edema was noted in patients with AVM volumes greater than 3 ml and in patients with Spetzler–Martin Grade IV and V AVMs.

Conclusions

Gamma Knife radiosurgery is an effective modality for the treatment of intracranial AVMs in children, yielding high obliteration rates and low complication rates.

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Ravi Sharma, Revanth Goda, Sachin Anil Borkar, Varidh Katiyar, Samagra Agarwal, Amandeep Kumar, Sarita Mohapatra, Arti Kapil, Ashish Suri and Shashank S. Kale

OBJECTIVE

The authors aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Acinetobacter isolates responsible for nosocomial meningitis/ventriculitis in the neurosurgical ICU. The authors also sought to identify the risk factors for mortality following Acinetobacter meningitis/ventriculitis.

METHODS

This was a retrospective study of 72 patients admitted to the neurosurgical ICU between January 2014 and December 2018 with clinical and microbiological diagnosis of nosocomial postneurosurgical Acinetobacter baumanii meningitis/ventriculitis. Electronic medical data on clinical characteristics, underlying pathology, CSF cytology, antibiotic susceptibilities, and mortality were recorded. To evaluate the outcome following nosocomial postneurosurgical Acinetobacter meningitis/ventriculitis, patients were followed up until discharge or death in the hospital. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to compute factors affecting survival.

RESULTS

The study population was divided into two groups depending on the final outcome of whether the patient died or survived. Forty-three patients (59.7%) were included in the survivor group and 29 patients (40.3%) were included in the nonsurvivor group. Total in-hospital mortality due to Acinetobacter meningitis/ventriculitis was 40.3% (29 cases), with a 14-day mortality of 15.3% and a 30-day mortality of 25%. The 43 (59.7%) patients who survived had a mean length of hospital stay of 44 ± 4 days with a median Glasgow Outcome Scale–Extended score at discharge of 6. On univariate analysis, age > 40 years (p = 0.078), admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≤ 8 (p = 0.003), presence of septic shock (p = 0.011), presence of external ventricular drain (EVD) (p = 0.03), CSF white blood cell (WBC) count > 200 cells/mm3 (p = 0.084), and comorbidities (diabetes, p = 0.036; hypertension, p = 0.01) were associated with poor outcome. Carbapenem resistance was not a risk factor for mortality. According to a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model, age cutoff of 40 years (p = 0.016, HR 3.21), GCS score cutoff of 8 (p = 0.006, HR 0.29), CSF WBC count > 200 cells/mm3 (p = 0.01, HR 2.76), presence of EVD (p = 0.001, HR 5.42), and comorbidities (p = 0.017, HR 2.8) were found to be significant risk factors for mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

This study is the largest case series reported to date of postneurosurgical Acinetobacter meningitis/ventriculitis. In-hospital mortality due to Acinetobacter meningitis/ventriculitis was high. Age older than 40 years, GCS score less than 8, presence of EVD, raised CSF WBC count, and presence of comorbidities were risk factors for mortality.